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I am trying to pass a String argument to a ArrayList parameter like so:

Class A {
 public void testA (ArrayList arrayInput) {
      // Implement function
      System.out.println("In testA function");
   }
  String a = "new";
  testA(a);
}

I do this because I want to use the same function to pass both String values and ArrayList values. Is there a work around?

Thanks, Sony

share|improve this question
up vote 3 down vote accepted
// Option 1: print in String - preferred
public void testA(ArrayList<String> list) {
    for(String str : list) testA(str);
}

public void testA(String s) {
    System.out.println(s);
}



// Option2: print in List - not so preferred
public void testA(ArrayList<String> list) {
    for(String str : list) System.out.println(str);
}

public void testA(String s) {
    ArrayList<String> list = new ArrayList<String>();
    list.add(s);
    testA(list);
}
share|improve this answer

If you want to use the same function to pass both types, you must overload function:

    Class A {
     public void testA (ArrayList arrayInput) {
          // Implement function
          System.out.println("In testA function");
       }
     public void testA (String stringInput) {
          // Implement function
          System.out.println("In testA function. For String!");
       }
      String a = "new";
      testA(a);
    }

Or you can write a function with generic:

public void testA<T>(T input){...}
share|improve this answer
    
Pardon me if I'm wrong, but shouldn't this be overloading the function instead of overriding? – tth Feb 18 '11 at 5:19
    
sorry, overloading of course :) – Sergey Vedernikov Feb 18 '11 at 5:20
    
Umm..what if the implementations of both the overridden functions essentially produce the same output. If I pass an ArrayList with only a single element "hello" and print all the elements of the ArrayList, the output would be "hello". This would be equal to passing a Single String with value "hello". However, if the arraylist is longer, then I would print more values. Essentially, both the overridden functions have the same functionality - say printing in this case. This is a shorter example of what I am trying to do. Thanks !!!! – sony Feb 18 '11 at 5:25
    
use generics than and check if T is String, than you write only one switch code for your "special" case. – Sergey Vedernikov Feb 18 '11 at 5:26
    
@ultor that's a very poor decision... really... sorry buddy – corsiKa Feb 18 '11 at 5:28

You could write overloaded methods as other answeres suggested.

Alternatively you could simply wrap the String object in a List and pass it to testA as shown below:

public static <A> void testA(List<A> list) {
  // some code that works over list
  System.out.println("In testA method");
}

String a = "new";
testA(Arrays.asList(a));
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