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I'm curious to know, what people here think about using org.apache.commons.lang.builder EqualsBuilder/HashCodeBuilder for implementing the equals/hashCode? Would it be a better practice than writing your own? Does it play well with Hibernate? What's your opinion?

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14  
Just don't be tempted by the reflectionEquals and reflectionHashcode functions; the performance is an absolute killer. –  skaffman Feb 18 '11 at 8:18
11  
I saw some discussion on here about equals yesterday and had some free time, so I did a quick test. I had 4 objects with different equals implementations. eclipse generated, equalsbuilder.append, equalsbuilder.reflection, and pojomatic annotations. The baseline was eclipse. equalsbuilder.append took 3.7x. pojomatic took 5x. reflection based took 25.8x. It was quite discouraging because I like the simplicity of the reflection based and I can't stand the name "pojomatic". –  digitaljoel Feb 18 '11 at 16:00
3  
Another option is Project Lombok; it uses bytecode generation rather than reflection, so it should perform as well as Eclipse-generated. projectlombok.org/features/EqualsAndHashCode.html –  Miles Aug 18 '11 at 0:01

6 Answers 6

up vote 142 down vote accepted

The commons/lang builders are great and I have been using them for years without noticeable performance overhead (with and without hibernate). But as Alain writes, the Guava way is even nicer:

Here's a sample Bean:

public class Bean{

    private String name;
    private int length;
    private List<Bean> children;

}

Here's equals() and hashCode() implemented with Commons/Lang:

@Override
public int hashCode(){
    return new HashCodeBuilder()
        .append(name)
        .append(length)
        .append(children)
        .toHashCode();
}

@Override
public boolean equals(final Object obj){
    if(obj instanceof Bean){
        final Bean other = (Bean) obj;
        return new EqualsBuilder()
            .append(name, other.name)
            .append(length, other.length)
            .append(children, other.children)
            .isEquals();
    } else{
        return false;
    }
}

and here with Guava:

@Override
public int hashCode(){
    return Objects.hashCode(name, length, children);
}

@Override
public boolean equals(final Object obj){
    if(obj instanceof Bean){
        final Bean other = (Bean) obj;
        return Objects.equal(name, other.name)
            && length == other.length // special handling for primitives
            && Objects.equal(children, other.children);
    } else{
        return false;
    }
}

As you can see the Guava version is shorter and avoids superfluous helper objects. In case of equals, it even allows for short-circuiting the evaluation if an earlier Object.equal() call returns false (to be fair: commons / lang has an ObjectUtils.equals(obj1, obj2) method with identical semantics which could be used instead of EqualsBuilder to allow short-circuiting as above).

So: yes, the commons lang builders are very preferable over manually constructed equals() and hashCode() methods (or those awful monsters Eclipse will generate for you), but the Guava versions are even better.

And a note about Hibernate:

be careful about using lazy collections in your equals(), hashCode() and toString() implementations. That will fail miserably if you don't have an open Session.


Note (about equals()):

a) in both versions of equals() above, you might want to use one or both of these shortcuts also:

@Override
public boolean equals(final Object obj){
    if(obj == this) return true;  // test for reference equality
    if(obj == null) return false; // test for null
    // continue as above

b) depending on your interpretation of the equals() contract, you might also change the line(s)

    if(obj instanceof Bean){

to

    // make sure you run a null check before this
    if(obj.getClass() == getClass()){ 

If you use the second version, you probably also want to call super(equals()) inside your equals() method. Opinions differ here, the topic is discussed in this question:

right way to incorporate superclass into a Guava Objects.hashcode() implementation?

(although it's about hashCode(), the same applies to equals())


Note (inspired by Comment from kayahr)

Objects.hashCode(..) (just as the underlying Arrays.hashCode(...)) might perform badly if you have many primitive fields. In such cases, EqualsBuilder may actually be the better solution.

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17  
The same will be possible with Java 7 Objects.equals: download.oracle.com/javase/7/docs/api/java/util/… –  Thomas Jung Feb 18 '11 at 15:49
    
@Thomas nice, that's a step in the right direction! –  Sean Patrick Floyd Feb 18 '11 at 16:16
    
I like the commons-lang features, but isn't it a bad practice to create a new object on each .hashCode() or .equals() call? –  Stephan Sep 30 '11 at 8:24
    
@Stephan I guess that's why the guava approach works with static methods and without Object creations (although technically the varargs invocation of Objects.hashCode generates an array Object, but there's no way around that without overloading the method n times) –  Sean Patrick Floyd Sep 30 '11 at 8:34
2  
@SeanPatrickFloyd The Guava-way not only creates an array object for the varargs, it also converts ALL parameters to objects. So when you pass 10 int values to it then you will end up with 10 Integer objects and an array object. The commons-lang solution only creates a single object, no matter how many values you append to the hash code. The same problem with equals. Guava converts all values to objects, commons-lang only creates a single new object. –  kayahr Apr 12 '13 at 12:56

If you do not want to depend on a 3rd party library (maybe you are running an a device with limited resources) and you even do not want to type your own methods, you can also let the IDE do the job, e.g. in eclipse use

Source -> Generate hashCode() and equals()...

You will get 'native' code which you can configure as you like and which you have to support on changes.


Example (eclipse Juno):

import java.util.Arrays;
import java.util.List;

public class FooBar {

public String string;
public List<String> stringList;
public String[] stringArray;

/* (non-Javadoc)
 * @see java.lang.Object#hashCode()
 */
@Override
public int hashCode() {
    final int prime = 31;
    int result = 1;
    result = prime * result + ((string == null) ? 0 : string.hashCode());
    result = prime * result + Arrays.hashCode(stringArray);
    result = prime * result
            + ((stringList == null) ? 0 : stringList.hashCode());
    return result;
}
/* (non-Javadoc)
 * @see java.lang.Object#equals(java.lang.Object)
 */
@Override
public boolean equals(Object obj) {
    if (this == obj)
        return true;
    if (obj == null)
        return false;
    if (getClass() != obj.getClass())
        return false;
    FooBar other = (FooBar) obj;
    if (string == null) {
        if (other.string != null)
            return false;
    } else if (!string.equals(other.string))
        return false;
    if (!Arrays.equals(stringArray, other.stringArray))
        return false;
    if (stringList == null) {
        if (other.stringList != null)
            return false;
    } else if (!stringList.equals(other.stringList))
        return false;
    return true;
}

}

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6  
True, but the code generated by Eclipse is unreadable and unmaintainable. –  Sean Patrick Floyd Feb 18 '11 at 16:20
3  
Please, never ever think about something as terrible as the eclipse-generated equals. If you don't want to depend on 3rd party library, then write the one-line method like Objects.equal yourself. Even when used only once or twice, it makes the code way better! –  maaartinus Jul 21 '12 at 2:07
    
@maaartinus equals/hashCode one line methods??? –  FrVaBe Aug 27 '12 at 17:05
    
No, but public static boolean equal(Object a, Object b) {return a==b || (a!=null && a.equals(b));} from Guava is a one-liner and makes anybody repeating the null tests in their equals method look pretty stupid. –  maaartinus Aug 27 '12 at 17:15
    
@maaartinus Guava is a 3rd party library. I pointed out that my solution can be used if you want to AVOID using 3rd party libraries. –  FrVaBe Aug 28 '12 at 14:07

The EqualsBuilder and HashCodeBuilder have two main aspects that are different from manually written code:

  • null handling
  • instance creation

The EqualsBuilder and HashCodeBuilder make it easier to compare fields that could be null. With manually writen code this creates a lot of boilerplate.

The EqualsBuilder will on the other hand create an instance per equals method call. If your equals methods are call often this will create a lot of instances.

For Hibernate the equals and hashCode implementation make no difference. They are just an implementation detail. For almost all domain objects loaded with hibernate the runtime overhead (even without escape analysis) of the Builder can be ignored. Database and communication overhead will be significant.

As skaffman mentioned the reflection version cannot be used in production code. Reflection will be to slow and the "implementation" will not be correct for all but the simplest classes. Taking all members into account is also dangerous as newly introduced members change the equals method behaviour. The reflection version can be useful in test code.

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I disagree that the reflection implementation "will not be correct for all but the simplest classes." With the builders you can explicitly exclude fields if you like, so the implementation really depends on your business key definition. Unfortunately, I can't disagree with the performance aspect of the reflection based implementation. –  digitaljoel Feb 18 '11 at 15:52
1  
@digitaljoel Yes, you can exclude fields, but these definitions are not refactoring save. So I did not mention them on purpose. –  Thomas Jung Feb 18 '11 at 15:58
    
Good point Thomas. Thanks. –  digitaljoel Feb 18 '11 at 16:01

If you don't to write your own, there is also the possibility to use google guava (formerly google collections)

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If you are just dealing with the entity bean where id is a primary key, you can simplify.

   @Override
   public boolean equals(Object other)
   {
      if (this == other) { return true; }
      if ((other == null) || (other.getClass() != this.getClass())) { return false; }

      EntityBean castOther = (EntityBean) other;
      return new EqualsBuilder().append(this.getId(), castOther.getId()).isEquals();
   }
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In my opinion it doesn't play well with Hibernate, especially the examples from the answer comparing length, name and children for some entity. Hibernate advises to use business key to be used in equals() and hashCode(), and they have their reasons. If you use auto equals() and hashCode() generator on your business key, it's ok, just the performance problems need to be considered as mentioned previously. But people usually uses all properties what is IMO very wrong. For example I'm currently working on project where entities are written using Pojomatic with @AutoProperty, what I consider a really bad pattern.

Their two main scenarios to use hashCode() and equals() are:

  • when you put instances of persistent classes in a Set (the recommended way to represent many-valued associations) and
  • when you use reattachment of detached instances

So let's assume our entity looks like this:

class Entity {
  protected Long id;
  protected String someProp;
  public Entity(Long id, String someProp);
}

Entity entity1 = new Entity(1, "a");
Entity entity2 = new Entity(1, "b");

Both are the same entity for Hibernate, which have been fetched from some session at some point (their id and class/table are equal). But when we implement auto equals() a hashCode() on all props, what do we have?

  1. When you put the entity2 to the persistent set where the entity1 already exists, this will be put twice and will result in exception during commit.
  2. If you want to attach the detached entity2 to the session, where entity1 already exists they (probably, I haven't tested this especially) won't be merged properly.

So, for 99% project I make, we use the following implementation of equals() and hashCode() written once in base entity class, which is consistent with the Hibernate concepts:

@Override
public boolean equals(Object obj) {
    if (StringUtils.isEmpty(id))
        return super.equals(obj);

    return getClass().isInstance(obj) && id.equals(((IDomain) obj).getId());
}

@Override
public int hashCode() {
    return StringUtils.isEmpty(id)
        ? super.hashCode()
        : String.format("%s/%s", getClass().getSimpleName(), getId()).hashCode();
}

For the transient entity I do the same what Hibernate will do on persistence step, ie. I use the instance match. For the persistent objects I compare the unique key, which is the table/id (I never use composite keys).

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