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I am currently working on a API site based on Zend Framework. As ZF doesn't have sufficient support for Digest Authentication and it is too late to shift to another framework now, I am thinking of implementing Basic Authentication.

Basic and Digest are not actually the ideal way to perform authentication, while Digest is better but unfortunately not quite supported by Zend (implementing it properly will take too much work, need the project done asap). One of the big problem with Basic auth is that password is sent in cleartext form. I am thinking instead of sending the password in cleartext form, can I somehow hash it using one-way-hashing algorithm / bcrypt to avoid sending password in cleartext form? But it is still suffering from man-in-the-middle attack though.

But if comparing the basic authentication with current form-based authentication used by most web-apps, are they both sharing the same security problem while transferring the request to the server?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Your best option for keeping the request secure is to use SSL for your authentication requests to ensure that the information isn't sent in plaintext.

If you try to do some kind of hashing or encryption on the client before sending the authentication request, you immediately expose your hashing algorithm and any salts you might be using to malicious users. This makes it possible for them to use dictionary attacks against your server.

But if comparing the basic authentication with current form-based authentication used by most web-apps, are they both sharing the same security problem while transferring the request to the server?

Absolutely they are. Again with forms based authentication your best bet is to use SSL.

Alternatively, you might consider using an external authentication service like OAuth.

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unfortunately the other team members are too paranoid to have the member password handled by third party applications. Looks like SSL is the only way to ensure security. Thanks on the tips on dictionary attack though. –  Jeffrey04 Feb 18 '11 at 8:06
    
Glad I could help. Just to be clear though, OAuth isn't storing the user's password with a third party. It's letting users sign in to your system using credentials provided by a trusted third party that your users already have an account with. For example if your user has a gmail or facebook account, you could allow them to sign in using those accounts. In general these systems are already trusted by your users (since they have accounts there) and usually have a security policy in place that is quite a bit a bit more robust than smaller organizations can afford. –  apiguy Feb 18 '11 at 8:20
    
isn't that more like openlogin? terminology-aside, i should rephrase it as - the other team members are too paranoid to have others to handle the authN and authZ for some unknown reason. –  Jeffrey04 Feb 18 '11 at 9:30
    
Yeah every project's needs are going to be different and there are some disadvantages to using OAuth for sure. SSL is fairly easy to set up and there are quality providers now that offer certificates at very low cost. Sounds like thats the way to go. –  apiguy Feb 18 '11 at 15:49

Hum, Zend Framework has an Digest Adapter for Authentication?

Manual: Zend Digest Authentication

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but zend_http doesn't send request with digest auth, besides, the adapter doesn't implement some parts of the rfc 2617 (nonce tracking). –  Jeffrey04 Feb 18 '11 at 7:44

You could always write your own Zend_Auth_Adapter for HTTP authentication. I implemented Zend_Auth_Adapter_Http_Resolver_Interface to have different passwords each day in the format of default password + day + month. Works like a charm!

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yea, will need to do that when i have more time –  Jeffrey04 Feb 18 '11 at 9:31

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