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What I'm looking for is a basic operation (Which I'm sure have a name I'm just unaware of atm). I have a matrix like:

{1,2,3}

{A,N,F}

{7,8,9}

which I'd like to mutate into

{1,A,7}

{2,N,8}

{3,F,9}

(The above are only identifiers for objects not real values. The actual objects are of the same type and unordered)

I'd prefer a declarative solution to it but speed is a factor. I'm going to have to turn quite a few tables (100k cells a min) and a slow version would be on the critical path.

However I'm still more interested in a readable solution. I'm looking for alternative solutions to the below. (By alternative I do not mean variations but a different approach)

var  arrays = rows.Select(row => row.ToArray());
var cellCount = arrays.First().Length;
for(var i = 0;i<cellCount;i++){
  yield return GetRow(i,arrays);
}

IEnumerable<T> GetRow(int i,IEnumerable<T[]> rows){
  foreach(var row in rows}{
     yield return row[i]; 
  }
}

Amongst two almost equally readable solutions I'd go for the faster but readability goes before speed

EDIT It will always be a square matrix

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2  
It's called the transpose (en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Transpose) –  Frank Feb 18 '11 at 9:35
1  
I don't think it can get any more readable than this! –  logicnp Feb 18 '11 at 9:39
    
Is it only for square matrices, or also for non-square? –  Ken Wayne VanderLinde Feb 18 '11 at 9:42
    
@Novox thx I knew there was something my my algebra I'd forgotten –  Rune FS Feb 18 '11 at 10:09
    
A rotation over 90 degrees clockwise would in fact give {7,A,1} {8,N,2} {9,F,3}. –  MSalters Feb 18 '11 at 10:10
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6 Answers

up vote 10 down vote accepted

I'm a little iffy about this implementation. It has side-effects local to the iterator but looks logically clean to me. This assumes each sequence is the same length but should work for any. You can think of it as a variable length Zip() method. It should perform better than the other linked LINQ solutions found in the other answers as it only uses the minimum operations needed to work. Probably even better without the use of LINQ. Might even be considered optimal.

public static IEnumerable<IEnumerable<T>> Transpose<T>(this IEnumerable<IEnumerable<T>> source)
{
    if (source == null) throw new ArgumentNullException("source");
    var enumerators = source.Select(x => x.GetEnumerator()).ToArray();
    try
    {
        while (enumerators.All(x => x.MoveNext()))
        {
            yield return enumerators.Select(x => x.Current).ToArray();
        }
    }
    finally
    {
        foreach (var enumerator in enumerators)
            enumerator.Dispose();
    }
}
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1  
Seems clean to me. It will be executed eagerly as far as I can see. Not an issue in my case since I will always have to iterate all. The method implementation might be had to read though the call side will be easy. –  Rune FS Feb 18 '11 at 10:23
    
@Rune: What is it about this that might be hard to read? It's a rather simple implementation IMHO. –  Jeff Mercado Feb 18 '11 at 10:51
1  
On a side note, the second call to ToArray() could probably be removed. So a plus if you have many sequences to zip up. –  Jeff Mercado Feb 18 '11 at 11:04
    
enumerators.All(x => x.MoveNext()) does not really follow "least surprise" since the usual Linq statement is side effect free –  Rune FS Feb 18 '11 at 11:41
    
You actually don't need any of the ToArray it'll work without and if you move everything except for the first line into a different method it's also lazily evaluating as most linq methods are. If you hadn't already gotten the points at least a +1 for remembering to Dispose :) –  Rune FS Feb 18 '11 at 12:04
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Just a quick google search revealed these solutions:

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I like the first solution. the 3rd however is potentially very slow Could easily be fixed since the main problem is comparing Conut() to zero instead of simply using Any(). In the end I opted for performance and testing that the few lines of code works correctly. Thanks for the links –  Rune FS Feb 18 '11 at 12:05
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Take a look at this extension method. Linq transpose. I'm not sure about performance but the code looks elegant.

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Your question seems to be implying that you want to modify the original matrix.

If that's the case, and if you are able to store the matrix as a IList<IList<T>> matrix, then this will work, however, only in the case of a square matrix.

for(int i = 0; i < matrix.Count; ++i)
{
    for(int j = 0; j < i; ++j)
    {
        T temp = matrix[i][j];
        matrix[i][j] = matrix[j][i];
        matrix[j][i] = temp
    }
}
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That's a specific version of the approach in the question relying on Ilist<Ilist<T>>. I'm looking for a different approach relying on IEnumerable<IEnumerable<T>> –  Rune FS Feb 18 '11 at 10:25
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Well, what you are looking for here is a transformation T[][] -> T[][]. There are plenty of IEnumerabe<IEnumerable<T>>.Transpose() solutions around but they all boil down to looping enumerables using temporary lookups/keys and they leave a lot to be desired when it comes to performance on huge volume. Your example actually works faster (though you could loose the second foreach too).

First ask "do I need LINQ at all". You have not described what the purpose of the transposed matrix will be and if the speed is indeed your concern you might do well to just stay away from the LINQ/foreach and do it the old fashioned way (for inside for)

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No I do not need linq which is why I asked for a declarative solution as opposed to a linq solution :). There's room for improving readability with out hurting performance but blindsidedly improving the readability can impact our performance. It is on the critical path –  Rune FS Feb 18 '11 at 10:11
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Here's mine if anyone's interested. It performs in the same sort of manner as Jeff's, but seems to be slightly faster (assuming those ToArrays() are necessary). There's no visible loops or temporaries, and it's much more compact:

public static IEnumerable<IEnumerable<T>> Transpose<T>(
    this IEnumerable<IEnumerable<T>> source)
{
    return source
        .Select(a => a.Select(b => Enumerable.Repeat(b, 1)))
        .Aggregate((a, b) => a.Zip(b, Enumerable.Concat));
}

If you need it to handle empty lists too, then it becomes this:

public static IEnumerable<IEnumerable<T>> Transpose<T>(
    this IEnumerable<IEnumerable<T>> source)
{
    return source
        .Select(a => a.Select(b => Enumerable.Repeat(b, 1)))
        .DefaultIfEmpty(Enumerable.Empty<IEnumerable<T>>())
        .Aggregate((a, b) => a.Zip(b, Enumerable.Concat));
}

I noticed that the asker wrote that the matrix would always be square. This implementation (and jeffs) will evaluate an entire row at a time, but if we know that the matrix is square we can rewrite the zip function in a more suitable manner:

public static IEnumerable<IEnumerable<T>> Transpose<T>(
    this IEnumerable<IEnumerable<T>> source)
{
    return source
        .Select(a => a.Select(b => Enumerable.Repeat(b, 1)))
        .DefaultIfEmpty(Enumerable.Empty<IEnumerable<T>>())
        .Aggregate(Zip);
}

public static IEnumerable<IEnumerable<T>> Zip<T>(
    IEnumerable<IEnumerable<T>> first, 
    IEnumerable<IEnumerable<T>> second)
{
    var firstEnum = first.GetEnumerator();
    var secondEnum = second.GetEnumerator();

    while (firstEnum.MoveNext())
        yield return ZipHelper(firstEnum.Current, secondEnum);
}

private static IEnumerable<T> ZipHelper<T>(
    IEnumerable<T> firstEnumValue, 
    IEnumerator<IEnumerable<T>> secondEnum)
{
    foreach (var item in firstEnumValue)
        yield return item;

    secondEnum.MoveNext();

    foreach (var item in secondEnum.Current)
        yield return item;
}

This way, each element won't be evaluated until it's returned.

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