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This is a follow up question to that at http://stackoverflow.com/questions/495194/can-i-create-a-html-table-width-a-percentage-height-but-pixel-accurate-row-height.

I have a table in a HTML page that will be used for tabular data (so I don't want an answer based around divs). This needs to be rendered at 100% height with the top row having a fixed size and the second row stretching to fit the rest of the available area.

I have used the following code:

<html>
  <body>
    <table style="border-collapse:collapse;height:100%;width:100%;">
      <tr>
        <td style="border:solid 1px black;height:100px">1</td>
        <td style="border:solid 1px black">2</td>
      </tr>
      <tr>
        <td style="border:solid 1px black">3</td>
        <td style="border:solid 1px black">4</td>
      </tr>
    </table>
  </body>
</html>

This works as I require it to.

The problem is, when I put this in an ASP.NET page created in Visual Studio, it adds a DOCTYPE element. After adding the DOCTYPE (and setting the CSS for the html and body tags to include height:100%), the top row of the table is much bigger than the bottom row and neither row is of a fixed height.

I know I should use a DOCTYPE and not rely on "quirks mode" in Internet Explorer to ensure future compatibility. However, I have tried all the DOCTYPEs I can find to try and change this behaviour to what I need but can't get it to work. It does work in Firefox but the job is for an Intranet where the users use IE7.

If you want to see the problem, try the following:

<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD XHTML 1.0 Transitional//EN" "http://www.w3.org/TR/xhtml1/DTD/xhtml1-transitional.dtd">
<html style="height:100%">
  <body style="height:100%">
    <table style="border-collapse:collapse;height:100%;width:100%;">
      <tr>
        <td style="border:solid 1px black;height:100px">1</td>
        <td style="border:solid 1px black">2</td>
      </tr>
      <tr>
        <td style="border:solid 1px black">3</td>
        <td style="border:solid 1px black">4</td>
      </tr>
    </table>
  </body>
</html>

Does anyone know the answer?

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-1 Working solution was already posted to this in that question stackoverflow.com/questions/495194/… –  cletus Feb 2 '09 at 21:53
    
@cletus: That solution doesn't work for me in standards mode. The #bottom div is as tall as the window, with 100px on top of that for #top, so I get a scrollbar. –  mercator Feb 2 '09 at 22:42
    
Yup. Doesn't work for me either. –  Baffled by ASP.NET Feb 3 '09 at 9:12
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4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

There's an easy way to fix this, especially if the page just contains this table, and you just want it to work. I'm not sure if ASP.NET will let you though: Add a comment in front of the doctype. E.g.

<!-- Here for IE6/7 -->
<!DOCTYPE html (etc.)>
... The HTML that works in quirks mode ...

This will make IE6 and IE7 trigger quirks mode, meaning those earlier answers will actually work. But it is perfectly valid use of the DOCTYPE and will trigger standards mode in all other browsers. IE8 (RC1 anyway) also uses quirks mode for this, though it does also render correctly in standards mode.

Of course, keeping IE6 and 7 in quirks mode means they'll be in quirks mode for all the other stuff too, so if you're going to use a lot of other CSS, you might regret it.

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I try to use % as less as possible because padding, borders and margins are added to the 100% width if any, unless you use browsers from the stone-age.. I use to just tile a background image to fake whatever I want to have 100% height on a parent element or the body.

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Well the solution I posted to your problem, which had a (necessary) div wrapped around your table, works perfectly with that DOCTYPE and a couple of others I tried so I'm not sure what the problem is.

Are you simply choosing to ignore it because it has a div in it? Or did you not read it or try it? What is the problem with divs?

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Hi. I did try your example. Perhaps I missed something (as I am under a lot of pressure to get some software out I am testing things pretty quickly.) However, I found that the bottom row was 100% of the window height, rather than just the remainder of the window. What did I miss? –  Baffled by ASP.NET Feb 3 '09 at 9:06
    
...there's no problem with divs. I am using them for layout. –  Baffled by ASP.NET Feb 3 '09 at 9:21
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first I would recommend setting the height at the Row level, not the Cell level. And secondly if you set the height of the second row to 100% IE will have it fill the rest of the available space in the table. The following should work:

<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD XHTML 1.0 Transitional//EN" "http://www.w3.org/TR/xhtml1/DTD/xhtml1-transitional.dtd">
<html style="height:100%">
  <body style="height:100%">
    <table style="border-collapse:collapse;height:100%;width:100%; table-layout:fixed;">
      <tr style="height: 100px;">
        <td style="border:solid 1px black">1</td>
        <td style="border:solid 1px black">2</td>
      </tr>
      <tr style="height: 100%">
        <td style="border:solid 1px black">3</td>
        <td style="border:solid 1px black">4</td>
      </tr>
    </table>
  </body>
</html>

Using the percent based heights though is probably not your best choice, but without knowing and understanding what you are trying to accomplish thats the best advice i can give you

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I see the same problem here as with cletus' answer. The top cell is fixed and the bottom one expands with the window, but the table is 100px taller than the browser window. Essentially, the bottom row is 100% of the window height, not just the remainder of the height after the top row. (IE7) –  Baffled by ASP.NET Feb 3 '09 at 9:08
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