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I have been playing around with node.js, and coming from a Java background, I am struggling to differentiate between modules and the typical concept of objects in JavaScript.

When implementing a modules, I am currently doing it this way:

// someModule.js
var privateVariable;
this.sampleFunction = function() {
   // ...
}

Now, the way I am using this module in another place is:

var moduleName = require('./someModule');

var foo = moduleName.sampleFunction();

I don't know if this is the right way to do modular development in node.js - because I realized I am not actually using objects, like using new() - which I would need to do when I want to have collections etc. What is the right way to proceed here if I want a collection of person objects - how will my module and it's definition look like?

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For general background on your question you might find JavaScript: The Good Parts by Douglas Crockford a helpful read. It provides a clear and concise (the whole book is only 176 pages--a rarity) explanation of how JavaScript differs from "classical" (as the author refers to them) languages. –  TK-421 Feb 18 '11 at 11:40

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted
// someModule.js
var privateVariable;
this.Person = function(firstName, lastName) {
   this.firstName = '...';
}

And then:

var moduleName = require('./someModule');

var foo = new moduleName.Person('foo', 'bar');
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A module is a namespace to hold a bunch of related items in. So you might have a "person-collections" module, which contains several types of person collections, such as "lineup", "pile" and "dumpster".

Depending on whether you're using an oo or a functional style of writing, the actual code will look different.

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