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I'm trying to load a bunch of images recursively and it works perfectly in all browsers except the god-forsaken IE because of the restriction of 13 recursions.

Now I can fix this on my own, but I do want to follow "best practice", so to speak, since I'm still learning jQuery. And I'm guessing the gurus around here could give a helpful pointer. How would you suggest fixing it?

My code snippet:

$(document).ready(function(){
    loadThumbs(["1.jpg","2.jpg","3.jpg","4.jpg","5.jpg","6.jpg","7.jpg","8.jpg",
               "9.jpg","10.jpg","11.jpg","12.jpg","13.jpg","14.jpg","15.jpg",
               "16.jpg","17.jpg","18.jpg","19.jpg","20.jpg"], 0);
});
function loadThumbs(files, index){
    if(index == files.length) return;
    var file = files[index];
    var image = new Image();
    $(image)
        .load(function(){
            $("#container").append(image);
            loadThumbs(files, index+1);
        })
        .addClass("thumb")
        .attr("src", file);
}

If you try this in IE (8 in my case) you'll get Stack Overflow error.

Thanks!

share|improve this question
    
maybe i just don't get it but how do you stop recursion? –  Dalen Feb 18 '11 at 11:49
2  
just a note, why are you using recursion at all? a simple for-loop iterating over the items in the array will do just fine. –  Ozzy Feb 18 '11 at 11:54
    
Damn, my bad. I forgot I removed the stop condition. In the beginning of the function I do "if(index == files.length) return;" so stopping the recursion is NOT the problem in question. Even if stopped after all 20 files have loaded all browsers display the page properly and IE fails after 13 recursions. –  Alexander Filatov Feb 18 '11 at 13:31

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I assume you're loading images one-by-one because it looks prettier, than loading them in parallel. A little rewrite should solve stack overflow problem:

Before:
loadThumbs(files, index+1);

After:
var nextIndex = index + 1;
setTimeout(function() { loadThumbs(files, nextIndex) }, 0)

And yes, add a check for array boundary at the top of your function: if (!files[index]) return;, I bet that's the reason why the code breaks in IE8.

share|improve this answer
    
Sorry, Alisey! I totally forgot I removed the stop condition from the function while I was testing and now that I'm not at home I cannot reupload the proper file. I do the check "if(index == files.length) return false;" in the beginning of the loadThumbs function, so STOPPING the recursion is not the problem. It's the fact that IE cannot handle more than 13 recursions of a function in global context. I think I've figured out the solution, but I can't test it here at university on a unix machine. I'll get back to this question as soon as I get home and try your solution too :) –  Alexander Filatov Feb 18 '11 at 13:40
    
setTimeout really did the trick! Спасибо, Алексей :) –  Alexander Filatov Feb 18 '11 at 15:03

I've tried it in firefox and IE 8 and it is failing. I've even tried it in IE 8 with no add ons.

From your code

function loadThumbs(files, index){
 var file = files[index];
 var image = new Image();
 $(image)
 .load(function(){
 $("#container").append(image);
 loadThumbs(files, index+1);
 })
 .addClass("thumb")
 .attr("src", file)
} 

As one of the comments asked, why use recursion at all? Try the following (excuse syntax errors).

function loadThumbs(files){
 for (index=0;index<files.length;i++)
 {
   var file = files[index];
   var image = new Image();
   $(image).load(function(){
     $("#container").append(image);
     loadThumbs(files, index+1);
   }).addClass("thumb").attr("src", file);
 }
} 

Maybe what's happening in your case is that when index reaches 20 (out of bounds of array), you will get an undefined for your file variable. This doesn't crash the browser though and since you have a var type, it will pass the undefined variable around and maybe in IE 8 it keeps incrementing the index by 1 without gracefully ending.

The other option is putting a check in your recursive method. Surround the logic with

 (if index < files.length) {...}

I did a basic test with

$(document).ready(function () {
        loadThumbs(["1.jpg", "2.jpg", "3.jpg", "4.jpg", "5.jpg", "6.jpg", "7.jpg", "8.jpg", "9.jpg", "10.jpg","11.jpg", "12.jpg", "13.jpg", "14.jpg", "15.jpg", "16.jpg", "17.jpg", "18.jpg", "19.jpg", "20.jpg"], 0);
    });

    function loadThumbs(files, index) {
        var file = files[index];
        $("#container").append(file);

        loadThumbs(files, index + 1);       
    }

Firefox displays the 20 file names. IE 8 crashes with a stack overflow exception.

share|improve this answer
    
I'm sorry, I forgot I removed the stop condition :) There should be a line in the beginning of the loadThumbs function like this: "if(index == files.length) return true;" so that when I reach the end of the array I quit loading. This is not the problem however. The problem is that IE does not allow more than 13 recursions for functions in global context. –  Alexander Filatov Feb 18 '11 at 13:37

You should not use recursion here, simple iteration is more than adequate. jQuery has the $.each function for this purpose.

var $container = $('#container');

function loadThumbs(files) {
    $.each(files, function(i, image_url) {
        $('<img class="thumb" />').attr("src", image_url).appendTo($container);
    });
}
share|improve this answer
    
This would add all images at once and load them in parallel. What I am trying to achieve is sequential loading. As Alisey says in her answer "it looks prettier" :) Once again - the problem is that IE cannot handle more than 13 global recursions. –  Alexander Filatov Feb 18 '11 at 13:34

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