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I have a set of enumeration values (fault codes to be precise). The code is a 16 bit unsigned integer. I am looking for a data structure that could represent such an enumeration. A similar question has been asked here: What's the best C# pattern for implementing a hierarchy with an enum?. But this hierarchy is deeper.


Sample enumeration values

Current = 0x2000,
Current_DeviceInputSide = 0x2100,
ShortToEarth = 0x2120,
ShortToEarthInPhase1 = 0x2121,
ShortToEarthInPhase2 = 0x2122,
ShortToEarthInPhase3 = 0x2123


Use case
When the user provides a code then the UI has to display the equivalent meaning of the code with the hierarchy.
For example, if the user provides a value 0x2121 then the UI has to display Short to earth in phase 1 in the current at device input side. The best way to represent this is by using a hierarchical notation: Current : DeviceInputSide : ShortToEarth : ShortToEarthInPhase1.


Competing approaches
I have three competing approaches to represent the enumeration:

  1. Create an enumeration at each level of the hierarchy. Then use a controller class to resolve the name.
  2. Store the enumeration values in an xml and use LINQ to generate the meaning of the code.
  3. Store the enumeration values in an xml. During the application startup. Create a singleton instance to retrieve the meaning. The instance contains a dictionary populated with the values from the xml.


Approach 1
The enumerations:

enum WarnCodes
{
    None= 0x000,
    Current = 0x2000
}

enum WarnCodes_Current
{
    DeviceInputSide = 0x2100,
    DeviceOutputSide = 0x2200
}

enum WarnCodes_Current_DeviceInputSide
{
    ShortToEarth = 0x2120,
    ShortCircuit = 0x2130
}

enum WarnCodes_Current_DeviceInputSide_ShortToEarth 
{
    InPhase1 = 0x2121,
    InPhase2 = 0x2122
}

The controller:

public string GetMeaning(int code)
{
    int bitMask = 0xF000;
    int maskedCode = bitMask & code;
    StringBuilder meaning = new StringBuilder();

    switch (maskedCode)
    {
        case WarnCodes.Current:
            meaning.Append("Current : ");
            bitMask = 0xFF00;
            maskedCode = bitMask & code;
            switch (maskedCode)
            {
                case WarnCodes_Current.DeviceInputSide:
                    meaning.Append("Current : Device Input Side :");
                    ...
                    break;
            }

            break;

            ...
    }
}


Approach 2
The xml to store the enumeration values looks like this

<WarnCodes>
  <code hex="2000" meaning="Current">
    <code hex="2100" meaning="Current, Device Input side">
      <code hex="2120" meaning="Short to Earth">
        <code hex="2121" meaning="Short to earth in Phase L1"/>
        <code hex="2122" meaning="Short to earth in Phase L2"/>
      </code>
    </code>
  </code>
</WarnCodes>
And the method used to query the codes is:

XElement rootElement = XElement.Load(settingsFilePath);
public string GetHierarchicalMeaning(int code)
{
    XElement rootElement = XElement.Load(warnCodesFilePath);

    List<string> meanings = new List();
    StringBuilder stringBuilder = new StringBuilder();
    IEnumerable<XElement> elements;

    elements = from el in rootElement.Descendants("code")
               where (string)el.Attribute("hex") == code.ToString("X")
               select el;

    XElement element = elements.First();

    while (element.Parent != null)
    {
        meanings.Add(element.Attribute("meaning").Value);
        element = element.Parent;
    }

    meanings.Reverse();

    foreach (string meaning in meanings)
    {
        stringBuilder.AppendFormat("{0} : ", meaning);
    }

    return stringBuilder.ToString().Trim().TrimEnd(':').Trim();
}


Approach 3
The xml to store the enumeration values is same as in Approach 2. The dictionary is populated from the xml by GetChildren().

private Dictionary<int, WarnCodeValue> warnCodesDictionary;

public void Initialize()
{
    XElement rootElement = XElement.Load(settingsFilePath);
    warnCodesDictionary = GetChildren(rootElement);
}

private Dictionary<int, WarnCodeValue> GetChildren(XElement element)
{
    if (element.Descendants().Count() > 0)
    {
        Dictionary<int, WarnCodeValue> childNodeDictionary = new Dictionary();

        foreach (XElement childElement in element.Elements())
        {
            int hex = Convert.ToInt32(childElement.Attribute("hex").Value, 16);
            string meaning = childElement.Attribute("meaning").Value;

            Dictionary<int, WarnCodeValue> dictionary = GetChildren(childElement);
            WarnCodeValue warnCodeValue;
            if (dictionary == null)
            {
                warnCodeValue = new WarnCodeValue() {Meaning = meaning};
            }
            else
            {
                warnCodeValue = new WarnCodeValue() {Meaning = meaning, ChildNodes = dictionary};
            }

            childNodeDictionary.Add(hex, warnCodeValue);
        }

        return childNodeDictionary;
    }

    return null;
}

The meanings are retrieved using GetHierarchicalMeaning():

public string GetHierarchicalMeaning(int code)
{
    StringBuilder stringBuilder = new StringBuilder();

    int firstLevel = code & 0xF000;
    int secondLevel = code & 0xFF00;
    int thirdLevel = code & 0xFFF0;

    if(warnCodesDictionary.ContainsKey(firstLevel))
    {
        stringBuilder.AppendFormat("{0} : ", warnCodesDictionary[firstLevel].Meaning);
        if (warnCodesDictionary[firstLevel].ChildNodes != null && 
            warnCodesDictionary[firstLevel].ChildNodes.ContainsKey(secondLevel))
        {
            stringBuilder.AppendFormat("{0} : ", warnCodesDictionary[firstLevel].ChildNodes[secondLevel].Meaning);

            if (warnCodesDictionary[firstLevel].ChildNodes[secondLevel].ChildNodes != null &&
                warnCodesDictionary[firstLevel].ChildNodes[secondLevel].ChildNodes.ContainsKey(thirdLevel))
            {
                stringBuilder.AppendFormat("{0} : ", 
                    warnCodesDictionary[firstLevel].ChildNodes[secondLevel].ChildNodes[thirdLevel].Meaning);

                if (warnCodesDictionary[firstLevel].ChildNodes[secondLevel].ChildNodes[thirdLevel].ChildNodes != null &&
                    warnCodesDictionary[firstLevel].ChildNodes[secondLevel].ChildNodes[thirdLevel].ChildNodes.ContainsKey(code))
                {
                    stringBuilder.AppendFormat("{0} : ", 
                        warnCodesDictionary[firstLevel].ChildNodes[secondLevel].ChildNodes[thirdLevel].ChildNodes[code].Meaning);
                }
            }
        }
    }
}

The WarnCodeValue class:

class WarnCodeValue
{
    public string Meaning
    { get; set; }

    public Dictionary<int, WarnCodeValue> ChildNodes { get; set; }
}


Questions

  1. Which of the above 3 approaches is better from a performance point of view?
  2. Are there any other approaches for representing the enumeration?
  3. Any improvements to the code?
share|improve this question
    
Why enumeration? –  Dyppl Feb 18 '11 at 12:21
    
@Dyppl, the values are a set of constant code (UInt16) values. I am using enum as I need to associate each code with its meaning. –  Devendra D. Chavan Feb 18 '11 at 12:23
    
Taking inspiration from the tree approach suggested by @paolo, the third approach (xml + dictionary retrieval of meaning) has been added above. –  Devendra D. Chavan Feb 21 '11 at 16:38
    
I have decided to go with Approach 3, as it offers improved performance during meaning generation while retaining the flexibility & hierarchy of the xml. –  Devendra D. Chavan Feb 21 '11 at 16:40
1  
@Devendra I think you've made the best choice. Xml is not getting nearly as much love as it was 10 years ago, but the one thing where I think it's unsurpassed is the ability to express a hierarchic data structure, like in this case. Only one more suggestion: I would concatenate the meanings of each node in GetChildren, when populating the dictionary (which happens only once at the beginning) rather than querying it four times every time you search a code. –  Paolo Falabella Feb 21 '11 at 16:56

4 Answers 4

Consider using classes instead of enums, you then use a singleton for each value and can use the type system to build a tree, including virtual methods to produce error txt etc. (This can sometimes be a good option, but can also lead you into lots of problems if it does not fit well)

share|improve this answer
    
the singleton class approach will involve creation of a type at each level of the hierarchy. Am I right? You have mentioned that lead you into lots of problems if it does not fit well, can you elaborate on that? –  Devendra D. Chavan Feb 19 '11 at 1:29

You could use FlagsAttribute. For instance you could do something like this:

[FlagsAttribute]
enum WarnCodes
{
    None= 0x0000,
    Current = 0x2000,

    // second level of hierarchy
    DeviceInputSide = 0x0100,
    DeviceOutputSide = 0x0200,

    // third level of hierarchy
    ShortToEarth = 0x0020,
    ShortCircuit = 0x0030,

    // fourth level of hierarchy
    InPhase1 = 0x0001,
    InPhase2 = 0x0002
}       

You can test it like this:

int[] testVals = {0x0000, 0x2000, 0x2130, 0x2122, 0x2121, 0x2131};

foreach(var val in testVals)
{
   Console.WriteLine( "{0,4:X} - {1}",
      val, ( (WarnCodes)val ).ToString( ) );
}
share|improve this answer
    
@paolo, this solution will work in case the enumerations are distinct. In my case, the meaning of an enumeration is relative. For example, InPhase1 is present in both ShortCircuit and ShortToEarth. But it's meaning is determined, by its parent (ShortCircuit or ShortToEarth). In an enumeration, the values cannot be repeated, so your solution will not resolve into the problem. –  Devendra D. Chavan Feb 18 '11 at 13:23
    
@Devendra, FlagsAttribute is turning your enum into a bitmask, so ShortCircuit -> InPhase1 will be correctly associated to 0x__31 while ShortToEarth -> InPhase1 will be associated to 0x__21 as you requested. Have you tried the test code I supplied? I've extended it to more cases, to show better how it works. –  Paolo Falabella Feb 18 '11 at 13:32
    
@paolo, I have the tried the code that you had supplied. But the problem is, the warn codes are across several fields (i.e Current, Voltage, etc.), so while Current = 0x2000, there is a value Voltage = 0x3000. So in your code 0x3122 will give the meaning as InPhase2, ShortToEarth, DeviceInputSide, Voltage. This does not make sense (Voltage cannot be shorted). The actual enumeration value of 0x3122 is Mains undervoltage in phase L2. –  Devendra D. Chavan Feb 18 '11 at 13:45
1  
@Devendra - I suggest you simple use your xml approach. While Paolo's approach is correct, it clearly will not satisfy your problem, and honestly an enumeration wouldn't be a good method to do what your doing. You also used the same value for three different phases within the same category which makes no sense. –  Ramhound Feb 18 '11 at 13:56
    
@Ramhound, even the xml approach exposes the xml to the user. In effect, any user could tinker with the xml causing the application to behave in an unexpected manner. Also, from a performance point of view, I am not sure if this approach is better. –  Devendra D. Chavan Feb 18 '11 at 14:03

Second attempt... You could implement your own tree structure where each node has a single-digit hexadecimal representation and a code like 0x2121 represents a branch of the tree:

                      >2 - (current)
                      / \
 (device input side)>1   2 (device output side)
                    /\   /\
                     >2 (short to earth)
                     /\  
                   >1 (in phase 1) 

So, to read what 0x2121 means, we follow the corresponding branch of the tree and (for each node) we read the message it contains.

Here's a quick and dirty implementation of the tree:

public class TreeNode
{
    private List<TreeNode> _children;

    public int hex {get; private set;}
    public string meaning {get; private set;}
    public IList<TreeNode> children {
        get{
            return _children.AsReadOnly();
        }
    }

    public TreeNode(int hex, string meaning)
    {
        this.hex = hex;
        this.meaning = meaning;
        _children = new List<TreeNode>();
    }

    public TreeNode addChild(int hex, string meaning)
    {
        if(hex<=0 || hex >=16) throw new ArgumentOutOfRangeException("hex");
        if(GetChildByCode(hex)!=null) throw new Exception("a child with code " + 
                                             hex.ToString() + " already exists");                   
        var child = new TreeNode(hex,meaning);
         _children.Add(child);
        return child;
    }

    public TreeNode TryAddChild(int hex, string meaning)
    {
        if(hex<=0 || hex >=16) throw new ArgumentOutOfRangeException("hex");
        var chd = GetChildByCode(hex);

        if(chd==null) { 
            chd = new TreeNode(hex,meaning);
            _children.Add(chd);
        }
        return chd;         
    }

    public void AddBranch(int hexPath, string[] meanings)
    {
        var lst = intToList(hexPath,16,new LinkedList<int>()).ToList();        
        var curNode = this;
        for(int i = 0; i<lst.Count; i++)
        {
            curNode = curNode.TryAddChild(lst[i], meanings[i]);             
        }                         
    }

    public TreeNode GetChildByCode(int hex)
    {
        return 
            (from c in _children
            where c.hex == hex
            select c).SingleOrDefault();          
    }

    public string getMessagesByPath(int hexPath)
    {            
        var lst = intToList(hexPath,16,new LinkedList<int>());
        var msgs = getMessagesByPath(lst, new List<string>(),this);
        return
            (msgs == null || msgs.Count==0) ?
                "None":
                msgs.Aggregate((s1, s2) => s1 + ": " + s2);
    }


    // recursively follow the branch and read the node messages
    protected IList<string> getMessagesByPath(LinkedList<int> hexPath, IList<string> accString, TreeNode curNode) 
    {
        if(hexPath.Count == 0 || hexPath.First.Value == 0 || curNode==null) 
            return accString;
        else   
        {
            var chd = curNode.GetChildByCode(hexPath.First.Value);                
            string meaning = (chd==null)? "not found": chd.meaning;
            accString.Add(meaning);
            hexPath.RemoveFirst();
            return getMessagesByPath(hexPath,accString,chd);
        }
    }

    // convert the code to a list of digits in the given base (in this case 16)
    // this could be an extension method for int      
    private LinkedList<int> intToList(int theInt, int theBase, LinkedList<int> acc)
    {
        if(theInt < theBase) 
        {
            acc.AddFirst(theInt);
            return acc;
        }
        else
        {
            acc.AddFirst(theInt % theBase);
            return intToList(theInt/theBase, theBase, acc);
        }
    }
}

you can populate the tree this way:

        var root = new TreeNode(0,"root");        

        root.AddBranch(0x2121, new string[] {"Current", "DeviceInputSide", "Short to Earth", "In phase I"});
        root.AddBranch(0x2122, new string[] {"Current", "DeviceInputSide", "Short to Earth", "In phase II"});
        root.AddBranch(0x2123, new string[] {"Current", "DeviceInputSide", "Short to Earth", "In phase III"});
        root.AddBranch(0x2221, new string[] {"Current", "DeviceOutputSide", "Short to Earth", "In phase I"});
        root.AddBranch(0x2222, new string[] {"Current", "DeviceOutputSide", "Short to Earth", "In phase II"});
        root.AddBranch(0x2223, new string[] {"Current", "DeviceOutputSide", "Short to Earth", "In phase III"});
// ...

this way you get total control over the hierarchical structure of your codes and can implement checks so that the structure itself cannot be corrupted. Searching a message remains easy and (since it does not process a code after the first 0), a search for 0x2000 should be more efficient because only the 2 is actually processed.

//search meaning of path
root.getMessagesByPath(0x2122)
share|improve this answer
    
this is an excellent implementation of the tree approach to store the values. But as you have pointed out, the population is messy and I am not sure that I can write that kind of code to populate all the nodes (there are around 100+ nodes!). –  Devendra D. Chavan Feb 21 '11 at 15:26
    
@Devendra: you're not easy to please, are you? :) I've added an AddBranch method that should make populating the tree not much more painful than writing the enum or the xml. –  Paolo Falabella Feb 21 '11 at 16:29
    
+1, I have implemented the tree approach using a dictionary (Approach 3). Thanks for the inspiration. :). Anyways improvements are welcome. –  Devendra D. Chavan Feb 21 '11 at 16:37
    
@Devendra thanks for the question. It was a good exercise! –  Paolo Falabella Feb 21 '11 at 16:50
up vote 0 down vote accepted

Found that a modified version of Approach 3 is most suitable. Thanks to @paolo for helping me come up with the answer.

Modified Approach 3

The xml containing the codes:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8" ?>
<WarnCodes>
  <code hex="2000" meaning="Current">
    <code hex="2100" meaning="Current, Device Input side">
      <code hex="2120" meaning="Short to Earth">
        <code hex="2121" meaning="Short to earth in Phase L1"/>
        <code hex="2122" meaning="Short to earth in Phase L2"/>
      </code>
    </code>
  </code>
  <code hex="3000" meaning="Voltage"/>
</WarnCodes>


The WarnCodeValue class:

class WarnCodeValue
{
    public string Meaning
    { get; set; }

    public string ConcatenatedMeaning
    { get; set; }

    public Dictionary<int, WarnCodeValue> ChildNodes 
    { get; set; }
}


The singleton processor class (to retrieve the meaning of a code):

sealed class WarnCodeProcessor
{
    private static Dictionary<int, WarnCodeValue> warnCodesDictionary;

    private static volatile WarnCodeProcessor _instance;

    private static object instanceLockCheck = new object();

    public static WarnCodeProcessor Instance
    {
        get
        {
            lock (instanceLockCheck)
            {
                if (_instance == null)
                {
                    _instance = new WarnCodeProcessor();
                }
            }

            return _instance;
        }
    }

    private WarnCodeProcessor()
    {
        warnCodesDictionary = new Dictionary<int, WarnCodeValue>();

        string currentDirectory = Path.GetDirectoryName(Assembly.GetExecutingAssembly().Location);
        string settingsFilePath = Path.Combine(currentDirectory, "WarnCodes.xml");
        XElement rootElement = XElement.Load(settingsFilePath);

        warnCodesDictionary = GetChildren(rootElement, string.Empty);
    }

    public string GetConcatenatedMeaning(int code)
    {
        string concatenatedMeaning = string.Empty;

        int firstLevel = code & 0xF000;
        int secondLevel = code & 0xFF00;
        int thirdLevel = code & 0xFFF0;

        if (warnCodesDictionary.ContainsKey(firstLevel))
        {
            concatenatedMeaning = warnCodesDictionary[firstLevel].ConcatenatedMeaning;

            if (warnCodesDictionary[firstLevel].ChildNodes != null &&
                warnCodesDictionary[firstLevel].ChildNodes.ContainsKey(secondLevel))
            {
                concatenatedMeaning = 
                    warnCodesDictionary[firstLevel].
                    ChildNodes[secondLevel].ConcatenatedMeaning;

                if (warnCodesDictionary[firstLevel].ChildNodes[secondLevel].ChildNodes != null &&
                    warnCodesDictionary[firstLevel].ChildNodes[secondLevel].ChildNodes.ContainsKey(thirdLevel))
                {
                    concatenatedMeaning = 
                        warnCodesDictionary[firstLevel].
                        ChildNodes[secondLevel].
                        ChildNodes[thirdLevel].ConcatenatedMeaning;

                    if (warnCodesDictionary[firstLevel].ChildNodes[secondLevel].ChildNodes[thirdLevel].ChildNodes != null &&
                        warnCodesDictionary[firstLevel].ChildNodes[secondLevel].ChildNodes[thirdLevel].ChildNodes.ContainsKey(code))
                    {
                        concatenatedMeaning = 
                            warnCodesDictionary[firstLevel].
                            ChildNodes[secondLevel].
                            ChildNodes[thirdLevel].
                            ChildNodes[code].ConcatenatedMeaning;
                    }
                }
            }
        }

        return concatenatedMeaning;
    }

    private static Dictionary<int, WarnCodeValue> GetChildren(XElement element, string concatenatedMeaning)
    {
        string elementMeaning = string.Empty;
        XAttribute attribute = element.Attribute("meaning");
        if (attribute != null)
        {
            elementMeaning = attribute.Value;
            concatenatedMeaning =
                string.IsNullOrEmpty(concatenatedMeaning) ? elementMeaning : string.Format("{0} : {1}", concatenatedMeaning, elementMeaning);
        }

        if (element.Descendants().Count() > 0)
        {
            Dictionary<int, WarnCodeValue> childNodeDictionary = new Dictionary<int, WarnCodeValue>();

            foreach (XElement childElement in element.Elements())
            {
                int hex = Convert.ToInt32(childElement.Attribute("hex").Value, 16);
                string meaning = childElement.Attribute("meaning").Value;

                Dictionary<int, WarnCodeValue> dictionary = GetChildren(childElement, concatenatedMeaning);

                WarnCodeValue warnCodeValue = new WarnCodeValue();
                warnCodeValue.ChildNodes = dictionary;
                warnCodeValue.Meaning = meaning;
                warnCodeValue.ConcatenatedMeaning =
                    string.IsNullOrEmpty(concatenatedMeaning) ? meaning : string.Format("{0} : {1}", concatenatedMeaning, meaning);

                childNodeDictionary.Add(hex, warnCodeValue);
            }

            return childNodeDictionary;
        }

        return null;
    }
}


Usage

string concatenatedMeaning = WarnCodeProcessor.Instance.GetConcatenatedMeaning(0x2121);


Output
Current : Current, Device Input side : Short to Earth : Short to earth in Phase L1


Possible modifications include a GetMeaning(code) to retrieve the original meaning of the code, rather than the concatenated meaning.

share|improve this answer
    
Suggestions to the above approach are most welcome. –  Devendra D. Chavan Feb 22 '11 at 2:11
    
I had received one more suggestion, that the concatenated meaning of all the nodes can be put in a single level dictionary Dictionary<int, string> where the key is the hex code and the value is the concatenated meaning. And this could be used by GetMeaning(). This dictionary should be created initially (during the singleton instantiation). –  Devendra D. Chavan Feb 24 '11 at 2:28

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