Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am still fairly new to Java programming and to JUnit testing. I use NetBeans 6.9.1 which comes with junit-4.5 (but I have added junit-4.8.2 to my library).

I have a number of test classes and in each class there are a number of @Test methods.

When I run a particular Test class it runs through each @Test method one at a time. I have also created a Test Suite with

@RunWith(Suite.class)
@Suite.SuiteClasses(value = {
    TestClassA.class,
    TestClassB.class,
    TestClassC.class})
public class NewTestSuite {
}

which will run through each of my Test Classes and within each run each @Test method.

My question is: is it possible for me to run the Test Classes simultaneously? Or, within each Test Class is it possible to run the @Test methods simultaneously?

Doing so would allow me to run through all of the tests much faster than having the classes and methods run one-at-a-time.

Thanks!

share|improve this question
    
How long do your unit tests run? –  khmarbaise Feb 18 '11 at 13:46
    
Anywhere from less than a second to 30-60 seconds. The application communicates with a data server so I would like to run several requests simultaneously to speed up the tests. –  kmccoy Feb 18 '11 at 13:57
    
I think 30-60 seconds is a reasonable amount time, if you don't need to run them every 30-60 seconds:) –  卢声远 Shengyuan Lu Feb 18 '11 at 14:02
    
The information about the data server sounds like an integration test and like an unit test? –  khmarbaise Feb 18 '11 at 14:46
    
@khmarbaise That may very well be the case. Should I not be using jUnit to test how well my application works in a client/server setting? Is this the wrong use of jUnit? Thanks. –  kmccoy Feb 18 '11 at 14:50
add comment

1 Answer

Use org.junit.experimental.ParallelComputer: Sample:

    public class NewTestSuite {

       public static void main(String[] s){

         Class[] cls={TestClassA.class,TestClassB.class,TestClassB.class };  

         //simultaneously all methods in all classes  
         Result result = JUnitCore.runClasses(new ParallelComputer(true, true), cls);
         System.out.print(result.wasSuccessful());

         //simultaneously among classes  
         //Result result = JUnitCore.runClasses(ParallelComputer.classes(), cls);  

         //simultaneously among methods in a class  
         //Result result = JUnitCore.runClasses(ParallelComputer.methods(), cls);  
      }
   } 
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. That looks promising. Where do I put this code? In my NewTestSuite class file? Or... how would you write a Test Suite which uses your code? –  kmccoy Feb 18 '11 at 13:55
    
Welcome. Put the code into a @Test method, or a main method, whatever. And I think there's no need this feature, if the testcases don't spend long time really. –  卢声远 Shengyuan Lu Feb 18 '11 at 13:58
    
Thanks. Future test cases could potentially run for hours so it would be nice to run a few at the same time. –  kmccoy Feb 18 '11 at 14:26
    
Could this somehow be added to a Test Suite? –  kmccoy Feb 18 '11 at 14:27
    
I guess it could, you could try it. –  卢声远 Shengyuan Lu Feb 18 '11 at 14:31
show 3 more comments

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.