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    struct Message
{
    char type;
    double idNum;
    char *Time;
    char *asset;
    bool BS;
    float price1;
    int shares1;
    float price2;
    int shares2;        
};
typedef struct Message Message;
struct Asset
        {
            oBook *OrderBook;
            Trade *TradeBook; //will point to the latest trade
            int QtyTraded;
            float ValueTraded;
            char* Time;
        };
typedef struct Asset Asset;
int main(int argc, char*argv[])
    {
        Message* newMessage;
        Asset* Check;
        //manipulation and initialization of Check, so that it holds proper values.

        newMessage = parser("N,2376,01/02/2011 09:15:01.342,JPASSOCIAT FUTSTK 24FEB2011,B,84.05,2000,0,0",newMessage);
    //  MessageProcess(newMessage,AssetMap);
        printf("LAST TRADE ADDRESS %p LAST TRADE TIME %s\n",Check->TradeBook,Check->Time);
    }
    Message*  parser(char *message,Message* new_Message)
    {
        char a[9][256];
        char* tmp =message;
        bool inQuote=0;
        int counter=0;
        int counter2=0;
        new_Message = (Message*)malloc(sizeof(Message));
        while(*tmp!='\0')
        {
            switch(*tmp)
            {
                case ',': if(!inQuote)
                       {    
                        a[counter][counter2]='\0';
                        counter++;
                        counter2=0;
                        }

                      break;
                case '"':
                    inQuote=!inQuote;
                    break;
                default:
                    a[counter][counter2]=*tmp;
                    counter2++;
                    break;
            }
        tmp++;

        }
            a[counter][counter2]='\0';
            new_Message->type = *a[0];
            new_Message->Time  = &a[2][11];
            new_Message->asset = a[3];
            if(*a[4]=='S')
            new_Message->BS = 0;
            else
            new_Message->BS = 1;
            new_Message->price1=atof(a[5]);
            new_Message->shares1=atol(a[6]);
            new_Message->price2=atof(a[7]);
            new_Message->shares2=atol(a[8]);
            new_Message->idNum = atoi(a[1]);
    return(new_Message);
    }

Here there is a serious memory clash, in two variables of different scope. I have investigated using gdb and it seems the address of new_Message->Time is equalling to the address of Check->Time.

They both are structures of different types I am trying to resolve this issue, because, when parser changes the value of new_Message->Time it manipulates the contents of Check->Time

Please do suggest how to solve this problem. I have lost(spent) around 10 hours and counting to resolve this issue, and tons of hair.

Soham

EDIT STRUCTURE DEF ADDED

share|improve this question
    
Can you provide the code for initialization of Check? –  Skurmedel Feb 18 '11 at 15:25
3  
Since you don't show us the crucial code - how Check is initialized - we can't tell you if you've done something wrong. –  Jonathan Leffler Feb 18 '11 at 15:25

2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

You're using an address of the stack allocated object to initialize new_Message->Time = &a[2][11];

share|improve this answer
    
both are strings –  Soham Feb 18 '11 at 15:44
1  
Good point - and new_Message->asset too. And it could explain why Check->time ends up with the same address as new_Message->time; the code that sets Check->time might be in a function that just happens to use the same address for its local storage as parser() used for its storage. –  Jonathan Leffler Feb 18 '11 at 15:49
1  
@Soham: strings in C have to be copied; pointers to local strings are dangerous. If you learned Java or Perl or Python first, they have real built-in strings; C doesn't. C has pointers; you have to take extreme care to make sure you know, at all times, where a string is allocated. You can't simply copy a pointer to a local variable to return a string to the caller. You have to take major steps to copy the data around - allocating (and then freeing) the space, or having the caller pass the space and the called function copy into that space. I think @ydroneaud has hit the core of your problem. –  Jonathan Leffler Feb 18 '11 at 15:52
2  
@Soham use strdup(). But be careful of memory leaks. –  ydroneaud Feb 18 '11 at 15:56
2  
One way is to use a function strdup() to copy a string. This is standard on POSIX systems (Linux, etc). If it isn't available on yours, you can write one easily: char *strdup(const char *str) { char *copy = malloc(strlen(str)+1); if (copy != 0) strcpy(copy, str); return(copy); }. –  Jonathan Leffler Feb 18 '11 at 15:58

Although you don't show us how you initialize Check which limits the amount of help we can give, there is an unnecessary parameter to parse() which you can remove.

int main(int argc, char **argv)
{
    Message *newMessage;
    Asset *Check;
    [...]
    newMessage = parser("N,2376...,0,0", newMessage);
    [...]
}

Message *parser(char *message, Message *new_Message)
{
    [...]
    new_Message = (Message *)malloc(sizeof(Message));
    [...]
    return(new_Message);
}

When you look at that skeleton, it may be easier to see that:

a. The value in main() passed to parser() as newMessage is undefined because the local variable has not been initialized, but

b. It doesn't matter much because the first thing that happens in parser() is that a value is allocated and assigned to the function's copy of the uninitialized value (new_Message), thus initializing the value used in parser().

So, the code is 'safe', but could be written as:

int main(int argc, char **argv)
{
    Message *newMessage;
    Asset *Check;
    [...]
    newMessage = parser("N,2376...,0,0");
    [...]
}

Message *parser(char *message)
{
    [...]
    Message *new_Message = (Message *)malloc(sizeof(Message));
    [...]
    return(new_Message);
}

It is best not to pass values to functions that are not used.

Also, most people either use underscores to separate words in names or use camelCase names, but not usually camel_Case which combines both.

share|improve this answer
    
I have added the structure definitions. –  Soham Feb 18 '11 at 15:44
    
@Soham: thanks for the structure definitions. Unfortunately, they aren't as interesting as the code that manipulates Check. –  Jonathan Leffler Feb 18 '11 at 15:46
    
:) Hard to disagree –  Soham Feb 18 '11 at 15:50

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