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interface I //: IEquatable<I>
{ }

class A : I
{
    static public bool operator !=(A a, I i)
    {
        return !(a == i);
    }

    static public bool operator ==(A a, I i)
    {
        return true;
    }

    public override bool Equals(object obj)
    {
        if (obj is I)
            return this == (I)obj;
        else
            return base.Equals(obj);
    }

    public override int GetHashCode()
    {
        return base.GetHashCode();
    }
}

class B : I
{
    static public bool operator !=(B b, I i)
    {
        return !(b == i);
    }

    static public bool operator ==(B b, I i)
    {
        return false;
    }

    public override bool Equals(object obj)
    {
        if (obj is I)
            return this == (I)obj;
        else
            return base.Equals(obj);
    }

    public override int GetHashCode()
    {
        return base.GetHashCode();
    }
}
public partial class Form1 : Form
{
    public Form1()
    {
        InitializeComponent();
    }

    private void Form1_Load(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        List<I> iss = new List<I>();
        A a = new A();
        B b = new B();
        iss.Add(a);
        iss.Add(b);

        if (iss[0] == iss[1])
            Console.WriteLine("a == b");
        else
            Console.WriteLine("a != b");

        if (iss[1] == iss[0])
            Console.WriteLine("b == a");
        else
            Console.WriteLine("b != a");
    }
}

The output is

a != b
b != a

I expected

a == b
b != a

Could somebody can explain it?

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

I'd set a breakpoint in each class's Equals() method and == operator, and see what gets called to evaluate each expression. It's obviously not what you expect. My guess is that because I does not and cannot require implementors to expose a == operator, when two Is are compared as you're doing, the runtime doesn't bother looking for overloaded operators and instead resorts to the System.Object ==, which performs a referential check.

share|improve this answer
    
interfaces can't have operators... but what if I need to force compare two I's? –  serhio Feb 18 '11 at 16:59
    
Require implementers of I to expose a named method like "SemanticallyEquals(I other)". Then, whether you treat the objects as Is or As and Bs, this method is available at that inheritance level (and not Object) so the call is guaranteed to follow your inheritance hierarchy instead of finding a shortcut. –  KeithS Feb 18 '11 at 17:30
    
Why not just have the interface extend IEquatable<I>? –  Mark Sowul Feb 18 '11 at 17:32
    
Perfectly valid as well. –  KeithS Feb 18 '11 at 21:09
    
@Mark Sowul: As you can see, your proposal was commented in my code... does not work, you can test it. I need A==I be true, B==I - false. –  serhio Feb 21 '11 at 10:11

Simple answer:

You have a List<I> and you compare two I with each other. Because interface I does not (and cannot) implement a compare operator the objects are compared by reference.

Instead you could use an abstract base class:

public interface I
{
}

public abstract class AbstractI : I
{
    public static bool operator ==(AbstractI left, I right)
    {
        return left.equals(right); //TODO can be null
    }
    public static bool operator !=(AbstractI left, I right)
    {
        return !left.equals(right);
    }

    protected abstract bool equals(I other);
}

public class A : AbstractI
{
    protected override bool equals(I other)
    {
        //TODO your compare code here
        throw new NotImplementedException();
    }
}

public class B : AbstractI
{
    protected override bool equals(I other)
    {
        //TODO your compare code here
        throw new NotImplementedException();
    }
}


List<AbstractI> l = new List<AbstractI>(){
    new A(),
    new B()
};

var x = l[0] == l[1];
share|improve this answer
    
interfaces can't have operators... but what if I need to compare two I's? –  serhio Feb 18 '11 at 16:59
    
If you are trying to compare if two objects implement the same interface try using the is key work. You should be able to do something like if(A is I && B is I). Not quite sure if that's what you are looking for though. –  cptScarlet Feb 18 '11 at 17:11
    
You would probabply end up with a static compare method or an abstract base class instead of an interface. –  matthias.lukaszek Feb 18 '11 at 17:16
    
@cptScarlet: no, this is not about Is, nor about testing the interface implementation. Is about comparing 2 objects, not their types. –  serhio Feb 21 '11 at 10:06
    
@matthias.lukaszek: So, how to "attach" this static method to standard object comparation (using ==)? –  serhio Feb 21 '11 at 10:08

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