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<?php
if(isset($_GET['action'])){
    switch ($_GET['action']) {
        case 'login':
            include 'header.php';
                if($_SERVER['REQUEST_METHOD'] == "post"){
                    if(!empty($_POST['password']) && $_SERVER['REMOTE_ADDR'] == "My IP Adress" && $_POST['password'] == "Password"){
                        $_SESSION['AlphenWeerNladmin'] = 1;
                        echo 'Logged in!';
                    }
                    else
                    {
                        echo 'Wrong password or IP adress';
                    }
                }
                else
                {
                    ?>
                        <form action="admin.php?action=login" method="post">
                            <input type="password" name="password">
                            <input type="submit" value="submit">
                        </form>
                    <?php
                }
            include 'footer.php';
            break;
        case 'logout':
            include 'header.php';
            $_SESSION['AlphenWeerNladmin'] = 0;
            echo 'Logged out!';
            include 'footer.php';
            break;

        default: 
            header('Location: 404.php');
            break;

    }
}
else
{
    header('Location: 404.php');
}
?>

When i go to admin.php?action=login and i try to log in, i get send to the form again?

Help please!

Greetings

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6 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted
            if($_SERVER['REQUEST_METHOD'] == "post"){

PHP's string comparisons are case-sensitive, and REQUEST_METHOD is all-capitals: 'POST' or 'GET', never 'post' or 'get'.

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Since the only conditional you have for determining login or not given the action is:

if($_SERVER['REQUEST_METHOD'] == "post")

Then you must conclude that this conditional is not being met. Perhaps there is a case sensitivity involved that you are overlooking? What is the actual value of $_SERVER['REQUEST_METHOD']?

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@Kris - it's the only conditional that will produce the login form. The other conditionals will all give different results. Perhaps you should read the code more closely. –  Joel Etherton Feb 18 '11 at 17:15
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The problem is with this line here:

if($_SERVER['REQUEST_METHOD'] == "post"){

You're posting GET variables as well, so the request method will be GET as far as I know and this statement will never equate to true.

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GET will return query strings which is what he's looking for. I would expect a POST to override the GET within REQUEST_METHOD but who knows. –  Kris Feb 18 '11 at 17:12
    
<form method="post" action="script.php?a=b"> will work just fine. you'll get the form fields in $_POST, and you'll also get a $_GET['a'] containing b. –  Marc B Feb 18 '11 at 17:13
    
I wasn't arguing that fact, I was saying that his REQUEST_METHOD check might not be satisfied here because he's sending GET and POST variables. I wasn't sure which takes precedence in the $_SERVER['REQUEST_METHOD'] variable –  JamesHalsall Feb 18 '11 at 17:15
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Use php build-in function strcmp() to compare stirngs

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Perhaps your IP address is not what you expect? Are you connecting to a remote server but using a local IP or something else? What happens if you remove that conditional?

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If it was the IP address, the page should still provide the message for wrong password or ip. –  Joel Etherton Feb 18 '11 at 17:14
    
Hmmm...damn, probably unless he has weird logic elsewhere that'll redirect to itself or something. –  Kris Feb 18 '11 at 17:16
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I found my own answer: I needed to use capital letters, like this:

if($_SERVER['REQUEST_METHOD'] == "POST")

Greetings

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What I usually do is strtolower() / strtoupper() and check accordingly. This eliminates the possibility of the request method returning back in a different case. –  John Cartwright Feb 18 '11 at 17:44
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