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1oid ReadBinary(char *infile,HXmap* AssetMap)
{
    int fd; 
   size_t bytes_read, bytes_expected = 100000000*sizeof(char); 
   char *data;

   if ((fd = open(infile,O_RDONLY)) < 0) 
      err(EX_NOINPUT, "%s", infile);


   if ((data = malloc(bytes_expected)) == NULL)
      err(EX_OSERR, "data malloc");

   bytes_read = read(fd, data, bytes_expected);

   if (bytes_read != bytes_expected) 
      printf("Read only %d of %d bytes %d\n", \
         bytes_read, bytes_expected,EX_DATAERR);

   /* ... operate on data ... */
    printf("\n");
    int i=0;
    int counter=0;
    char ch=data[0];
    char message[512];
    Message* newMessage;
    while(i!=bytes_read)
    {

        while(ch!='\n')
        {
        message[counter]=ch;
        i++;
        counter++;
        ch =data[i];
        }
    message[counter]='\n';
    message[counter+1]='\0';
//---------------------------------------------------
    newMessage = (Message*)parser(message);
    MessageProcess(newMessage,AssetMap);
//--------------------------------------------------    
    //printf("idNUM %e\n",newMessage->idNum);
    free(newMessage);
    i++;
    counter=0;
    ch =data[i];
    }
   free(data);  

}

Here, I have allocated 100MB of data with malloc, and passed a file big enough(not 500MB) size of 926KB about. When I pass small files, it reads and exits like a charm, but when I pass a big enough file, the program executes till some point after which it just hangs. I suspect it either entered an infinite loop, or there is memory leak.

EDIT For better understanding I stripped away all unnecessary function calls, and checked what happens, when given a large file as input. I have attached the modified code

void ReadBinary(char *infile,HXmap* AssetMap)
{
    int fd; 
   size_t bytes_read, bytes_expected = 500000000*sizeof(char); 
   char *data;

   if ((fd = open(infile,O_RDONLY)) < 0) 
      err(EX_NOINPUT, "%s", infile);


   if ((data = malloc(bytes_expected)) == NULL)
      err(EX_OSERR, "data malloc");

   bytes_read = read(fd, data, bytes_expected);

   if (bytes_read != bytes_expected) 
      printf("Read only %d of %d bytes %d\n", \
         bytes_read, bytes_expected,EX_DATAERR);

   /* ... operate on data ... */
    printf("\n");
    int i=0;
    int counter=0;
    char ch=data[0];
    char message[512];
    while(i<=bytes_read)
    {

        while(ch!='\n')
        {
        message[counter]=ch;
        i++;
        counter++;
        ch =data[i];
        }
    message[counter]='\n';
    message[counter+1]='\0';
    i++;
    printf("idNUM \n");
    counter=0;
    ch =data[i];
    }
   free(data);  

}

What looks like is, it prints a whole lot of idNUM's and then poof segmentation fault

I think this is an interesting behaviour, and to me it looks like there is some problem with memory

FURTHER EDIT I changed back the i!=bytes_read it gives no segmentation fault. When I check for i<=bytes_read it blows past the limits in the innerloop.(courtesy gdb)

share|improve this question
2  
sizeof(char) is 1. There is no reason to ever write that in your program. –  Carl Norum Feb 18 '11 at 17:39
    
Yeah, I just kept it for the sake of tomorrow, when I say, I dont want to allocate for a char but for a double.Just saying –  Soham Feb 18 '11 at 17:41
    
@Carl On the hp48 the sizeof(char) was 2 :-) ...units were 4 bits... –  ring0 Feb 18 '11 at 17:43
    
@ring0 - not if you programmed it in standard C it wasn't. It's required to be 1 by the language spec. –  Carl Norum Feb 18 '11 at 17:58
    
The fact that sizeof(char) is always 1 is true but rather misses the point, and there are good reasons to write that, as you noted. However, it's better to use sizeof(value) rather than sizeof(type) ... e.g., sizeof(*data); then you don't have to change it even if the type of the data changes. –  Jim Balter Feb 18 '11 at 23:12
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3 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Try the following loop. Basically, it refactors your implementation so there is only one place where i is incremented. Having two places is what's causing your trouble.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>

int main()
{
    const char* data = "First line\nSecond line\nThird line";
    unsigned int bytes_read = strlen(data);

    unsigned int i = 0;
    unsigned int counter = 0;
    char message[512];

    while (i < bytes_read)
    {
        message[counter] = data[i];
        ++counter;
        if (data[i] == '\n')
        {
            message[counter] = '\0';
            printf("%s", message);
            counter = 0;
        }
        ++i;
    }

    // If data didn't end with a newline
    if (counter)
    {
        message[counter] = '\0';
        printf("%s\n", message);
    }

    return 0;
}

Or, you could take the "don't reinvent the wheel" approach and use a standard strtok call:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>

int main()
{
    char data[] = "First line\nSecond line\nThird line";
    char* message = strtok(data, "\n");

    while (message)
    {
        printf("%s\n", message);
        message = strtok(NULL, "\n");
    }

        return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
I am sorry, it gives a segmentation fault. –  Soham Feb 19 '11 at 9:00
    
I am giving it a look, because imo, it just a refactor. –  Soham Feb 19 '11 at 9:16
    
@Soham, I ran my code snippets myself and they don't segfault. Can you post any mods you made to it? –  Karl Bielefeldt Feb 19 '11 at 16:54
    
Karl, I think its giving a segfault somewhere else. I think, its not a problem with your code. (=sheepish grin) –  Soham Feb 20 '11 at 6:04
add comment

The most glaring problem is this:

    while(ch!='\n')
    {
    message[counter]=ch;
    i++;
    counter++;
    ch =data[i];
    }

Unless the last character of the file (or the block that you've just read) is \n, you'll go past the end of the data array, most probably smashing the stack along the way (since you're not checking whether your write to message is within bounds).

share|improve this answer
    
but then,how come it worked with other similar but smaller files? –  Soham Feb 18 '11 at 18:15
    
in fact, if I reduce the data in the files below a certain threshold it works perfectly –  Soham Feb 18 '11 at 18:16
    
@Soham, probably has to do with your method for generating the large files versus the small ones. Also, I would change your while loop to be i < bytes_read, because you can increment i multiple times in the loop that will catch any boundary conditions. –  Karl Bielefeldt Feb 18 '11 at 18:34
    
let me check changing the loop condition....Edit: Nop it still hangs. –  Soham Feb 18 '11 at 18:40
    
You should also fix the loop that can go past your 512 sized buffer. If you have a buffer overflow, strange things happen. –  nos Feb 18 '11 at 23:51
show 1 more comment

Is it possible that on the system you're using, 500,000,000 is larger than the largest size_t? If so, bytes_expected may be rolling over to some smaller value. Then bytes_read is following suit, and you're ending up taking a smaller chunk of data than you actually expect. The result would be that for large data, the last character of data is unlikely to be a '\n', so you blow right past it in that inner loop and start accessing characters beyond the end of data. Segfault follows.

share|improve this answer
    
I changed back the i!=bytes_read it gives no segmentation fault. When I check for i<=bytes_read it blows past the limits in the innerloop.(courtesy gdb) –  Soham Feb 19 '11 at 3:32
    
@Soham What happens if you use i < bytes_read? –  charleyc Feb 19 '11 at 4:34
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