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When passing a -D parameter in Java, what is the proper way of writing the command-line and then accessing it from code?

For example, I have tried writing something like this...

if (System.getProperty("test").equalsIgnoreCase("true"))
{
   //Do something
}

And then calling it like this...

java -jar myApplication.jar -Dtest="true"

But I receive a NullPointerException. What am I doing wrong?

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consider using compareToIgnoreCase instead of equalsIgnoreCase for locale-agnostic identifiers; otherwise you may run into the Turkish four-Is problem, among others. –  McDowell Feb 19 '11 at 10:10
2  
May I suggest using Boolean.getBoolean instead of the long if-statement that you have? shankh.com/2009/07/07/some-fun-with-boolean-getboolean –  mark Dec 28 '11 at 7:31

3 Answers 3

up vote 38 down vote accepted

I suspect the problem is that you've put the "-D" after the -jar. Try this:

java -Dtest="true" -jar myApplication.jar

From the command line help:

java [-options] -jar jarfile [args...]

In other words, the way you've got it at the moment will treat -Dtest="true" as one of the arguments to pass to main instead of as a JVM argument.

(You should probably also drop the quotes, but it may well work anyway - it probably depends on your shell.)

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2  
Works perfectly now. Also interesting to note is that in order to replicate this behavior within the Eclipse debugger these types of parameters must be placed in the VM Arguments section under Run Configurations. –  Ryan Berger Feb 18 '11 at 19:52
    
At least from bash it works with the quotes there (and also allows spaces this way), I use this all the day for ant-calls. –  Paŭlo Ebermann Feb 18 '11 at 22:03
1  
@RyanBerger I would give you 5 "ups" if I could! This is exactly what I was hunting for. Thanks. –  april26 Apr 24 at 13:47

That should be

java -Dtest="true" -jar myApplication.jar

So

System.getProperty("test")

returns null => NPE

The main method in your jar receives 2 arguments : "-jar" and "myApplication.jar"

You should guard against NPE.

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You're giving parameters to your program instead to Java. Use

java -jar -Dtest="true" myApplication.jar 

instead.

Consider using

"true".equalsIgnoreCase(System.getProperty("test"))

to avoid the NPE. But do not use it always without thinking, sometimes throwing the NPE is the right behavior and sometimes something like

System.getProperty("test") == null || System.getProperty("test").equalsIgnoreCase("true")

is right (providing default true).

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1  
Actually, System.getProperty("test", "true").equalsIgnoreCase("true") would be the better way to write the last condition. –  Paŭlo Ebermann Feb 18 '11 at 22:05
1  
Boolean.getBoolean("test"); is another option. See. –  superfav Feb 18 '11 at 22:07
    
@Paulo Your solution works for properties only (I wanted to show a general one) but is nicer than mine. –  maaartinus Feb 19 '11 at 1:29

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