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In c, if I wanted an array of floats (for instance) I would just define the fixed size and allocate it, and I could access each element for math operations. However, I want the ability to have my arrays be mutable since they will continually grow in size (as the app is running, and the array could easily surpass 10000+ elements) and the idea of NSMutableArray sounds great. However, (if I understand correctly) it only stores objects, I would have to wrap my numbers in NSNumber, and then put those into the array. That seems like a ridiculous amount of overhead to just store an array of floats (or doubles or integers).

On the other hand, I see that there are flout attributes for Core Data, but I don't see how I could access this in the same way ( array[index] ). Am I missing something here? Should all heavy-lifting math just be done in fixed-sized c arrays, are there ways of using the foundation classes that I haven't stumbled upon, or are there ways of accessing core data objects like one would access an array?

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Retagged with 'cocoa' because this is a cocoa issue - even if original poster is developing for iPhone/Cocoa-Touch. –  westsider Feb 18 '11 at 21:00

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

you aren't missing anything here; there's not a formal objc interface for arrays of c scalar types.

the simple way (as westsider mentioned) is to use std::vector, and then implement serialization/deserialization using a mechanism such as CF/NS-Data.

you could wrap std::vector in an objc interface, if you wanted:

/* MONDoubleArray.h */

/* by using pimpl, i'm assuming you are not building everything as objc++ */
struct t_MONDoubleArray_data;

@interface MONDoubleArray : NSObject < NSCoding, NSCopying, NSMutableCopying >
{
    t_MONDoubleArray_data* data;
}

- (double)doubleAtIndex;
- (void)setDoubleAtiIndex:(double)index;
- (NSUInteger)count;

/*...*/

@end

/* MONDoubleArray.mm */

struct t_MONDoubleArray_data {
    std::vector<double> array;
};

@implementation MONDoubleBuffer

- (id)init
{
    self = [super init];
    if (0 != self) {
    /* remember your c++ error handling (e.g., handle exceptions here) */
        array = new t_MONDoubleArray_data;
        if (0 == array) {
            [self release];
            return 0;
        }
    }
    return self;
}

/*...more variants...*/

- (void)dealloc
{
    delete array;
    [super dealloc];
}

- (NSData *)dataRepresentationOfDoubleData { /*...*/ }
- (void)setDoubleDataFromDataRepresentation:(NSData *)data { /*...*/ }

/*...*/

@end

then, you'd have accomplished objc serialization without hassle.

there's also a way to use a CF/NS_MutableArray for scalars, using pointer (or narrower) sized entries:

@interface MONFloatBuffer : NSObject
{
    NSMutableArray * floats;
}

@end

@implementation MONFloatBuffer

- (id)init
{
    self = [super init];
    if (0 != self) {
        CFAllocatorRef allocator = 0; /* default */
        CFIndex capacity = 0; /* resizable */
        /* you could implement some of this, if you wanted */
        const CFArrayCallBacks callBacks = { 0 /* version */ , 0 /* retain */ , 0 /* release */ , 0 /* copyDescription */ , 0 /* equal */ };
        floats = (NSMutableArray*)CFArrayCreateMutable(allocator, capacity, &callBacks);
        // now we can read/write pointer sized values to `floats`,
        // and the values won't be passed to CFRetain/CFRelease.
    }
    return self;
}

@end

however, that would still fail to properly deserialize itself without customization. so... NSPointerArray would accomplish that more easily... but you still fixed to pointer sized values, so you have to write it yourself. which not terribly hard. the downside is the number of variants you may ultimately end up with.

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Thanks. Wrapping it in an objc interface is nice; although I lose the simple array[index] usage for [array index:index] (looks funny to me). I took the first example (fixed a couple issues). And it complies fine on its own (still need to add methods and protocols). However, if I add MONDoubleArray *doubleArray; to the app delegate interface of just a sample app, then I get an error in MONDoubleArray.h: "Expected specific-qualifer-list before 't_MONDoubleArray_data'". And I've searched all morning, for an explanation that fits. Any thoughts? –  Adam Feb 19 '11 at 18:48
    
Okay, changing the delegate from m to mm worked. But then, what is the point of wrapping it in a objc interface if I still have to compile ever class that uses it as objc++? Is there any performance issues with compiling my other classes as objc++? –  Adam Feb 19 '11 at 19:27
    
well, you can add whatever methods to the class you'd like to ease the syntax. also, you can just use c++ and expose the vector (assuming you want to switch every translation that sees the class to objc++). as far as the error, the code i posted for the header looks ok (apart from the typo 'setDoubleAtiIndex')... perhaps you should post your code and point out the line where the error occurs? if it happens here struct t_MONDoubleArray_data { std::vector<double> array; };, then that part is supposed to be in the MONDoubleArray.mm. it's c++, so the compile in a c/objc translation will fail. –  justin Feb 19 '11 at 19:28
    
@Adam see above post for a potential solution to your build error. performance issues compiling objc++. there is no loss in runtime performance of your program. however, the compile times will be slower, and require more resources. compiling objc++ is slower than compiling c, objc, or c++. as c++ doesn't execute slower than c, objc++ doesn't execute slower than objc. –  justin Feb 19 '11 at 19:34
    
Good to know on the performance side. I'm still confused as to why I have to compile the app delegate (in this test app) that uses this class as obcj++? The error is thrown on t_MONDoubleArray_data* array; inside the interface. Should I be able to use this class without compiling anything else as objc++? Just to test out some methods I tried adding a size method, with return (int) array.size(); And it just chokes on that with "Request for member 'size' in...., which is of non-class type 't_MONDoubleArray_data*'". Just when I thought I was getting objc... Thanks for your help –  Adam Feb 19 '11 at 19:45

I would avoid wrapping your floats in NSNumbers and using NSMutableArrays. As you say, this adds a ridiculous amount of overhead.

I would recommend using C++ Standard Template Library (STL) containers. In your case, vector would be the best.

Using STL will mean moving from Objective-C to Objective-C++ ... and it will require changing extensions of effected source files from .m to .mm, as well as adding #import to files that make use of std::vector.

Another approach would be to use an NSMutableData object - but you would probably end up doing more of the bookkeeping wrt appending data (floats).

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