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What are some of the standard issues or coding patterns in jQuery which lead to memory leaks?


I have seen a number of questions related to the ajax() call or jsonp or DOM removal on StackOverflow. Most of the jQuery memory leak questions are focussed on specific issues or browsers and it would be nice to have a listing of the standard memory leak patterns in jQuery.

Here are some related questions on SO:

Resources on the web:

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1 Answer

From what I understand, memory management in javascript is accomplished by reference counting - while a reference to an object still exists, it will not be deallocated. This means that creating a memory leak in a single page application is trivial, and can trip up those of use coming from a java background. This is not specific to JQuery. Take the following code for example:

function MyObject = function(){
   var _this = this;
   this.count = 0;
   this.getAndIncrement = function(){
       _this.count++;
       return _this.count;
   }
}

for(var i = 0; i < 10000; i++){
    var obj = new MyObject();
    obj.getAndIncrement();
}

It will look normal until you look at memory usage. Instances of MyObject are never deallocated while the page is active, due to the "_this" pointer (increase the max value of i to see it more dramatically.). (In older versions of IE they were never deallocated until the program exits.) Since javascript objects may be shared between frames (I don't recommend trying this as it is seriously temperamental.), there are cases where even in a modern browser javascript objects can hang around a lot longer than they are meant to.

In the context of jquery, references are often stored to save the overhead of dom searching - for example:

function run(){
    var domObjects = $(".myClass");
    domObjects.click(function(){
        domObjects.addClass(".myOtherClass");
    });
}

This code will hold on to domObject (and all its contents) forever, because of the reference to it in the callback function.

If the writers of jquery have missed instances like this internally, then the library itself will leak, but more often it is the client code.

The second example can be fixed by explicitly clearing the pointer when it is no longer required:

function run(){
    var domObjects = $(".myClass");
    domObjects.click(function(){
        if(domObjects){
            domObjects.addClass(".myOtherClass");
            domObjects = null;
        }
    });
}

or doing the lookup again:

function run(){
    $(".myClass").click(function(){
        $(".myClass").addClass(".myOtherClass");
    });
}

A good rule of thumb is to be careful where you define your callback functions, and avoid too much nesting where possible.

Edit: As was pointed out in the comments by Erik, you could also use the this pointer to avoid the unnescessary dom lookup:

function run(){
    $(".myClass").click(function(){
        $(this).addClass(".myOtherClass");
    });
}
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2  
Here's an example : jsfiddle.net/qTu6y/8 You can use Chrome's "Take a heapshot" in the profiler to see that every run of that block of code eats about 20MB of RAM. (Whilst testing it I did hit the "Script used too much RAM error on chrome") –  Raynos Mar 30 '11 at 13:19
1  
$(this).addClass would be better for performance in the last case since 'this' represents a core JS DOM element collection (which is what JQuery objects are typically wrapping using an adapter-style pattern) and JQ won't have to access the DOM again or parse every single DOM element on the page in the case of <IE9 (no getElementsByClassName under the hood). That last bit is also a good reason to avoid selectors that only use a className unless you're only supporting IE9 and more modern browsers in general. –  Erik Reppen May 21 '12 at 18:00
3  
jsfiddle.net/qTu6y/8 isn't a memory leak. It's an example of creating 100000 DIFFERENT instances of a click handler on the same object. Of course they're retained because they're all still active click handlers. If you don't believe me, put an alert in the click handler, run the code, click on the div, and see how many times the alert comes up for a single click. –  Steve Jun 8 '12 at 18:57
6  
The original "MyObject" example is also wrong. It does not create a memory leak. At least not in modern browsers like Chrome. Modern javascript engines do not use reference counting alone for garbage collection. As long as you break the reference to one of the root garbage collector objects, your object will be deleted. For pure javascript objects this just means making sure there isn't a reference chain to an object that leads back to the global scope. It gets a bit more complicated when you start mixing in DOM objects as well. –  Steve Jun 8 '12 at 19:07
2  
With regard to the "MyObject" example - It definitely leaked in IE6 (even after leaving the page), it leaked in IE7, and it used to leak in chrome too. I for one am happy that browsers are advancing to a point where this is no longer true –  tofarr Jun 19 '12 at 10:58
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