Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm creating a potentially long log of objects and do not want to keep them all in memory before writing to a file, so I can't write a serialized collection of the objects to a file. I'm trying to find out the 'best' way of reading in the entire stream of objects after logging has been finished.

I have noticed that the following does not work:

FileInputStream fis = new FileInputStream(log);
ObjectInputStream in = new ObjectInputStream(fis);
while ((obj = in.readObject()) != null) {
  // do stuff with obj
}

because the stream throws an exception when it reaches the end of a file rather than returning null (presumably because one can write/read null to object streams, causing the above loop not to behave as expected).

Is there a better way to do something like what I want to accomplish with the above loop than:

FileInputStream fis = new FileInputStream(log);
ObjectInputStream in = new ObjectInputStream(fis);
try {
  while (true) {
    obj = in.readObject();
    // do stuff with obj
  }
} catch (EOFException e) {
}

This seems a little clumsy. For an end-of-file object solution, is the following the best way?

private static final class EOFObject implements Serializable {
  private static final long serialVersionUID = 1L;
}

void foo() {
  Object obj;
  while (!((obj = in.readObject()) instanceof EOFObject)) {
    BidRequest bidRequest = ((BidRequestWrapper) obj).getBidRequest();
    bidRequestList.add(bidRequest);
  }
}
share|improve this question

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Your solution seems fine. Just make sure you have a finally clause, where you close your stream.

Alternatively, you can create an EOF object of yours, and add it at the end. Thus you can check if the currently read object is the EofObject, and break at that point.

share|improve this answer
    
Edited the question to include the EOFObject solution. Is what I've written the best way to do it? Thanks. –  jonderry Feb 18 '11 at 21:43
    
@jonderry yup, looks fine. Just remember to close the stream in a finally block (you can't avoid that part - so just try / finally) –  Bozho Feb 18 '11 at 21:45
    
Cool, is there any tradeoff at all between the EOFObject solution and catching the EOFException? –  jonderry Feb 18 '11 at 21:54
    
@jonderry apart from readability - I don't think so. Generally it is not a good practice to use exceptions to define your program flow, so you are avoiding that. Performance-wise, I guess the difference is negligible, if any. You can measure them with big data. –  Bozho Feb 18 '11 at 21:56
1  
I don't understand that. The method throws EOFException at end of stream. So use it. –  EJP Feb 19 '11 at 0:29

I'm creating a potentially long log of objects and do not want to keep them all in memory before writing to a file, so I can't write a serialized collection of the objects to a file

This requirement is not met when using Java serialization, because the serialization stream maintains strong references to the objects previously written, presumably in order to write back references should these objects need to be serialized again. This can be verified by running:

public static void main(String[] args) throws Exception {
    OutputStream os = new FileOutputStream("C:\\test");
    ObjectOutputStream oos = new ObjectOutputStream(os);
    for (Integer i = 0; i < 1E9; i++) {
        oos.writeObject(i);
    }
    oos.close();
}

A similar problem exists when deserializing the file. To resolve back references, the stream is very likely to keep all previously read objects alive to resolve potential back references to these objects from the serialization stream.

If you really need to be able to release these objects before the stream is fully written you might wish to use a fresh ObjectOutputStream for each (batch of) objects ObjectOutputStream.reset() - of course losing the capability to resolve back references from earlier streams. That is, the following program will not throw an OutOfMemoryError:

public static void main(String[] args) throws Exception {
    OutputStream os = new FileOutputStream("C:\\test");
    ObjectOutputStream oos = new ObjectOutputStream(os);
    for (Integer i = 0; i < 1E9; i++) {
        oos.writeObject(i);
        oos.reset();
    }
    oos.close();
}

Note that the metadata about the classes being serialized will be written anew after each reset, which is quite wasteful (the above program write about 80 bytes per Integer ...), so you should not reset too often, perhaps once every 100 objects?

For detecting the end of stream, I find bozho's suggestion of an EOF object best.

share|improve this answer
    
So even if there are no remaining references to the objects that have been written or their fields, they will not be garbage collected until the stream is closed? –  jonderry Feb 18 '11 at 21:23
1  
Yes, because the ObjectOutputStream can't know what other object you want to serialize later, and therefore, neither can the ObjectInputStream. –  meriton Feb 18 '11 at 21:28
    
Why does it matter what objects will be serialized later if there are no dependencies between the previously written objects and the objects to be written in the future? –  jonderry Feb 18 '11 at 21:45
3  
@jonderry Also see ObjectOutputStream.html#reset(). –  superfav Feb 18 '11 at 21:47
2  
@jonderry: The OOS does not know before whether there will be dependencies, so it has to store references to all objects ever stored (and the ObjectInputStream, too), to be able to restore a graph of objects to an isomorphic graph on the other side. If you know you don't need this (and don't want this), reset is the right thing to do here to avoid blocking garbage collection. Creating new ObjectOutpuStreams is not useful, as you then also have to create new ObjectInputStreams at the other end. –  Paŭlo Ebermann Feb 18 '11 at 22:01

Write a boolean after each object, with the "last" object being followed by a false. So, in your stream that you write out:

true
<object>
true
<object>
true
<object>
false

Then, when reading them back in, you check the flag (you know there will always be one after each object) to decide whether or not to read another one.

boolean will be stored very compactly in a serialization stream, so it shouldn't add much to the file size.

share|improve this answer

Your code is incorrect. readObject() doesn't return null at EOS, it throws EOFException. So catch it. Null is returned if you wrote a null. You don't need all the booleans or marker objects suggested above.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.