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When using the Graphics2D scale() function with two different parameters (scaling by different ratios in x- and y-direction), everything drawn later on this Graphics2D object is scaled too. This has the strange effect that lines drawn in one direction are thicker than those in another direction. The following program produces this effect, it shows this window:

example screenshot

public class StrokeExample extends JPanel {


    public void paintComponent(Graphics context) {
        super.paintComponent(context);
        Graphics2D g = (Graphics2D)context.create();
        g.setStroke(new BasicStroke(0.2f));

        int height = getHeight();
        int width = getWidth();

        g.scale(width/7.0, height/4.0);

        g.setColor(Color.BLACK);
        g.draw(new Rectangle( 2, 1, 4, 2));
    }

    public static void main(String[] params) {
        EventQueue.invokeLater(new Runnable(){public void run() {

            StrokeExample example = new StrokeExample();

            JFrame f = new JFrame("StrokeExample");
            f.setSize(100, 300);
            f.getContentPane().setLayout(new BorderLayout());
            f.getContentPane().add(example);
            f.setDefaultCloseOperation(WindowConstants.DISPOSE_ON_CLOSE);
            f.setVisible(true);
        }});

    }

}

I'm using this coordinate transform to avoid having to manually transform my application model coordinates (the (2,1, 2,4) in this example) to screen (or component) pixel coordinates, but I don't want this stroke distortion. In other words, I want to have all lines the same width, independent of current x- and y-scale-factors.

I know what produces this effect (the Stroke object creates a stroked shape of the rectangle to be painted in user coordinates, which then are translated to screen coordinates), but I'm not sure on how to solve this.

  • Should I create a new Stroke implementation which strokes Shapes differently in X- and Y-direction (thereby undoing the distortion here)? (Or does anyone already knows such an implementation?)
  • Should I transform my shapes to screen coordinates and stroke there?
  • Any other (better) ideas?
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This was my first question here ... and gave me my ninth badge, yay! –  Paŭlo Ebermann Feb 18 '11 at 21:33
    
... and my eleventh badge, too, for accepting my own answer. –  Paŭlo Ebermann Feb 21 '11 at 13:32
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2 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Turns out my question was not so horrible difficult, and that my two ideas given in the question are actually the same idea. Here is a TransformedStroke class which implements a distorted Stroke by transforming the Shape.

import java.awt.*;
import java.awt.geom.*;


/**
 * A implementation of {@link Stroke} which transforms another Stroke
 * with an {@link AffineTransform} before stroking with it.
 *
 * This class is immutable as long as the underlying stroke is
 * immutable.
 */
public class TransformedStroke
    implements Stroke
{
    /**
     * To make this serializable without problems.
     */
    private static final long serialVersionUID = 1;

    /**
     * the AffineTransform used to transform the shape before stroking.
     */
    private AffineTransform transform;
    /**
     * The inverse of {@link #transform}, used to transform
     * back after stroking.
     */
    private AffineTransform inverse;

    /**
     * Our base stroke.
     */
    private Stroke stroke;


    /**
     * Creates a TransformedStroke based on another Stroke
     * and an AffineTransform.
     */
    public TransformedStroke(Stroke base, AffineTransform at)
        throws NoninvertibleTransformException
    {
        this.transform = new AffineTransform(at);
        this.inverse = transform.createInverse();
        this.stroke = base;
    }


    /**
     * Strokes the given Shape with this stroke, creating an outline.
     *
     * This outline is distorted by our AffineTransform relative to the
     * outline which would be given by the base stroke, but only in terms
     * of scaling (i.e. thickness of the lines), as translation and rotation
     * are undone after the stroking.
     */
    public Shape createStrokedShape(Shape s) {
        Shape sTrans = transform.createTransformedShape(s);
        Shape sTransStroked = stroke.createStrokedShape(sTrans);
        Shape sStroked = inverse.createTransformedShape(sTransStroked);
        return sStroked;
    }

}

My paint-method using it then looks like this:

public void paintComponent(Graphics context) {
    super.paintComponent(context);
    Graphics2D g = (Graphics2D)context.create();

    int height = getHeight();
    int width = getWidth();

    g.scale(width/4.0, height/7.0);

    try {
        g.setStroke(new TransformedStroke(new BasicStroke(2f),
                                          g.getTransform()));
    }
    catch(NoninvertibleTransformException ex) {
        // should not occur if width and height > 0
        ex.printStackTrace();
    }

    g.setColor(Color.BLACK);
    g.draw(new Rectangle( 1, 2, 2, 4));
}

Then my window looks like this:

screenshot of undistorted stroke

I'm quite content with this, but if someone has more ideas, feel free to answer nevertheless.


Attention: This g.getTransform() is returning the complete transformation of g relative to the device space, not only the transformation applied after the .create(). So, if someone did some scaling before giving the Graphics to my component, this would still draw with a 2-device-pixel width stroke, not 2 pixels of the grapics given to my method. If this would be a problem, use it like this:

public void paintComponent(Graphics context) {
    super.paintComponent(context);
    Graphics2D g = (Graphics2D)context.create();

    AffineTransform trans = new AffineTransform();

    int height = getHeight();
    int width = getWidth();

    trans.scale(width/4.0, height/7.0);
    g.transform(trans);

    try {
        g.setStroke(new TransformedStroke(new BasicStroke(2f),
                                          trans));
    }
    catch(NoninvertibleTransformException ex) {
        // should not occur if width and height > 0
        ex.printStackTrace();
    }

    g.setColor(Color.BLACK);
    g.draw(new Rectangle( 1, 2, 2, 4));
}

In Swing normally your Graphics given to the paintComponent is only translated (so (0,0) is the upper left corner of your component), not scaled, so there is no difference.

share|improve this answer
    
I added another remark regarding getTransform, which I just hit on a similar working TransformedStringDrawer when I started to test my component in another place than "only componente of JFrame" - there the translation was relevant. –  Paŭlo Ebermann Feb 25 '11 at 16:17
    
I added these classes (TransformedStroke, StrokeExample) to my github repository. –  Paŭlo Ebermann Mar 4 '11 at 18:12
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Have you just tried to make the int x and int y on the application bigger like int x = 500 int y = 900??? Also my suggestion is that with out rewritten the whole code is to implement where the recs are thicker when the app is closer together more like doubling the rectangle on the top and the bottom but when the app is extended the recs on the top and bottom go back to normal...

share|improve this answer
    
Of course when I change the proportions of the JFrame (and thus my component) the proportions of the stroke width are changing, too. Bot the whole point of my question was to be independent of the scaling factor. (I didn't really understand the second sentence, sorry.) –  Paŭlo Ebermann Mar 5 '11 at 1:37
    
My fault but the suggestion is that you could tried to make like a double rec on the top and bottom to make it look thicker without doing the whole code again just a thought even tho makes no sense but may point you in the right direction tho :) But I ran your code i have a solution for ya but another problem i switched the 7.0<- height and 4.0<- width when u run it again it cuts the rec in half and not sure how to solve it tho :( –  user635673 Mar 5 '11 at 1:54
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