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I have following functionality in few different classes C1, D2, F34:

class C1
{
    void SomeFunc
    {
        Statement1();
        Obj = GetObj();
        Statement2(Obj);
    }
    IMyObj Obj{get;private set;}
}

public static class MyObjExt
{
    public static void Statement2(this IMyObj obj)
    {
        ... do validation of 'obj';
        ... throw exception if object state is wrong
    }
}

Classes C1, D2, F34 aren't member of same hierarchy.

so I would like to avoid copy paste of them.

I could do something like this:

static MyObj MyFunc()
{
  Statement1();
  IMyObj obj = GetObj();
  Statement2(obj);

  return obj;
}
class C1
{
  void SomeFunc
  {
      Obj = MyFunc();
  }
  IMyObj Obj{get;private set;}
}

but if "Statement2" function throws an exception obj member will left uninitialized...

How could I avoid copy-paste?

share|improve this question
2  
What do you want to happen? –  Lasse V. Karlsen Feb 18 '11 at 20:31
    
I want to have 'Obj' property always initialized. Especially, if exception is thrown in 'Statement2'. –  Budda Feb 18 '11 at 20:38
1  
I don't understand what you're trying to do. It looks like Statement1() and Statement2() have nothing to do with the initialization of Obj - why have them in the same method? –  David Hoerster Feb 18 '11 at 20:50
    
What operation does Statement2() perform on the newly-instanced obj? Is it possible to break what you're doing there out into multiple calls? This is confusingly-factored. –  48klocs Feb 18 '11 at 20:53
    
Statement2 uses Obj. Actually, it validates object state (I will update question) –  Budda Feb 18 '11 at 21:01
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1 Answer 1

I have a little bit more complicated solution:

class Extender
{
    static IMyObj MyFunc(out IMyObj obj)
    {
        Statement1();
        obj = GetObj();
        Statement2(obj);
    }
}

class C1
{
  void SomeFunc
  {
    IMyObj obj=null;
    try
    {
         MyFunc(out obj);
    }
    finally
    {
        Obj = obj;
    }
  }
  IMyObj Obj{get;private set;}
}

But I not sure if it will and must work. Is this good or bad approach?

If you think it is good - please vote, if no - please point "why"?

Thanks a lot!

EDIT: Added 'SomeFunc' implementation after modification.

share|improve this answer
    
I don't think this is a good solution. Why would you want to guarantee C1.Obj gets initialized, even with an object in an invalid state? –  R. Martinho Fernandes Feb 18 '11 at 21:10
    
That is a piece of service. I want to log any error occurred during service method execution. I extract this object from DB using "composite key" and this object will have solid (valid) primary key. I want to use this primary key in log table. Actually, I could use a separate object just in order to store key, but for this example it doesn't matter (I will need to store some information before potential exception can be thrown. –  Budda Feb 18 '11 at 22:19
    
That won't compile. Methods can only exist within a class in C#. –  Amy Feb 19 '11 at 3:21
    
Just add any static class around those 'MyFunc' method... it is not a big deal. My intention was to show an idea. Hope, idea is clear enough –  Budda Feb 19 '11 at 4:12
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