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I love string.IsNullOrEmpty method. I'd love to have something that would allow the same functionality for IEnumerable. Is there such? Maybe some collection helper class? The reason I am asking is that in if statements the code looks cluttered if the patter is (mylist != null && mylist.Any()). It would be much cleaner to have Foo.IsAny(myList).

This post doesn't give that answer: IEnumerable is empty?.

SUMMARY: Please see answers below for possible workarounds.

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@msarchet: I'd probably give you the answer if this weren't the comment :) –  Schultz9999 Feb 18 '11 at 23:14
    
possible duplicate of C#: Recommended way to check if a sequence is empty –  nawfal Feb 18 '13 at 20:55
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5 Answers

up vote 45 down vote accepted

Sure you could write that:

public static class Utils {
    public static bool IsAny<T>(this IEnumerable<T> data) {
        return data != null && data.Any();
    }
}

however, be cautious that not all sequences are repeatable; generally I prefer to only walk them once, just in case.

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6  
Is this a good pattern? I would drop the this there – I consider extension methods which are assumed to be called on null as a sign of ugly design. –  Mormegil Feb 18 '11 at 22:49
8  
@Mormegil Why? extension methods finally give C# some capability to work with nulls, which other languages (like Ruby) completely take for granted. –  Matt Greer Feb 18 '11 at 22:54
1  
Why is this necessarily bad? As in this case, it is sometimes very handy since it lets you treat things more homogeneously and with fewer special cases. –  Mr. Putty Feb 18 '11 at 22:54
2  
@Mormegil meh - I can't get excited about that. As long as the intent is clear, etc. –  Marc Gravell Feb 18 '11 at 22:55
1  
I see nothing wrong with it, as long as there's no implication that it shouldn't be null. –  Gabe Feb 18 '11 at 23:00
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public static bool IsNullOrEmpty<T>(this IEnumerable<T> enumerable) {
    return enumerable == null || !enumerable.Any();
}
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4  
+1: because you gave the OP exactly what he asked for :) –  rsenna May 15 '13 at 21:24
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I don't think this function exists, but you can always create a small helper function that does exactly what you said to accomplish the same thing, while reducing clutter in your if statements.

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Here's the code from Marc Gravell's answer, along with an example of using it.

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;

public static class Utils
{
    public static bool IsAny<T>(this IEnumerable<T> data)
    {
        return data != null && data.Any();
    }
}

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        IEnumerable<string> items;
        //items = null;
        //items = new String[0];
        items = new String[] { "foo", "bar", "baz" };

        /*** Example Starts Here ***/
        if (items.IsAny())
        {
            foreach (var item in items)
            {
                Console.WriteLine(item);
            }
        }
        else
        {
            Console.WriteLine("No items.");
        }
    }
}

As he says, not all sequences are repeatable, so that code may sometimes cause problems, because IsAny() starts stepping through the sequence. I suspect what Robert Harvey's answer meant was that you often don't need to check for null and empty. Often, you can just check for null and then use foreach.

To avoid starting the sequence twice and take advantage of foreach, I just wrote some code like this:

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        IEnumerable<string> items;
        //items = null;
        //items = new String[0];
        items = new String[] { "foo", "bar", "baz" };

        /*** Example Starts Here ***/
        bool isEmpty = true;
        if (items != null)
        {
            foreach (var item in items)
            {
                isEmpty = false;
                Console.WriteLine(item);
            }
        }
        if (isEmpty)
        {
            Console.WriteLine("No items.");
        }
    }
}

I guess the extension method saves you a couple of lines of typing, but this code seems clearer to me. I suspect that some developers wouldn't immediately realize that IsAny(items) will actually start stepping through the sequence. (Of course if you're using a lot of sequences, you quickly learn to think about what steps through them.)

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If you call IsAny on a null, it will throw an exception –  Ace Trajkov Apr 1 '13 at 11:10
1  
Did you try it, @Ace? It looks like it would throw an exception, but extension methods can be called on null instances. –  Don Kirkby Apr 1 '13 at 16:22
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There isn't a straight up function like String.IsNullorEmpty but you can do your own test. YOu can even make it a function in your own utililty class i guess.

List<T> Ts = ????;

if(null!= Ts && 0<Ts.Count)
{
//Ts is not Null or Empty
}

an alternative to the .Count is .Any()

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