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Most decent programmers know that unit testing is important, but may not know where to begin. For a long time I knew the benefits of unit testing, but could never seem to figure out where a good starting point was.

Most articles I read on the subject dealt with the high level theoretical, rather than the down-and-dirty practical. I've noticed that recently, some articles are appearing that create an application and then walk through where, and why, unit tests are applied to it.

These articles still haven't fully risen to the surface yet; after all, the theoretical articles are good, but they may not be the best thing to start with when trying to learn a new concept. What I want to know is, what is the best practical unit testing article or tutorial you know of? (language doesn't matter)

EDIT: I'm actually interested in amassing a list of tutorials, not complete books.

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Great question, this is exactly the same problem I am having at the moment. Some really helpful answers! –  Aron Rotteveel Feb 3 '09 at 13:08
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Why has this been closed as "not constructive". Simply looking at the upvotes and stars gives an idea of how constructive it is. This has been happening a lot on StackOverflow lately. Can the mod who closed this at least add a reason as to why this isn't constructive? –  Anshul Aug 2 '13 at 16:14
    
Here are some articles about unit testing in general unit-testing.net –  TGH Oct 10 '13 at 1:30
    
related stackoverflow.com/questions/10577254/… –  Adrien Be Dec 12 '13 at 10:25
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closed as not constructive by Bill the Lizard Jan 5 '12 at 11:44

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16 Answers

up vote 47 down vote accepted

Test Driven Development : By Example by Kent Beck, without hesitation.

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Definitely the best introductory book on unit testing. –  Bill the Lizard Feb 2 '09 at 20:57
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Too bad it's not available on Kindle :( –  Peter Ajtai Nov 13 '11 at 17:48
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Actually this book concentrates more on TDD rather than Unit testing. –  Songo Aug 12 '12 at 22:46
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The Art Of Unit Testing by Roy Osherove

The website of the book is http://artofunittesting.com/

Art Of Unit Testing

There is a Second Edition currently on the Manning Early Access Program

The books examples use .NET

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+1. I like this one. Short but detailed and easy to follow. –  RichardOD Mar 11 '10 at 9:48
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+1 This is a great book indeed. What's great about it is that it concentrates on unit testing only without going deep with TDD. IF you wanna learn TDD read this book first. –  Songo Aug 12 '12 at 22:47
    
@Songo - 1st you state: "it concentrates on unit testing only without going deep with TDD", then you say "IF you wanna learn TDD read this book first". Those statements contradict. Which is it, a good Unit Testing only or a TDD centric Unit Testing book? –  atconway Feb 22 '13 at 14:02
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@atconway I can see why u got confused by my comment. What I meant to say is if you want to learn TDD then you must learn how to do Unit Testing first. Most TDD books assume that you are somewhat familiar with unit testing. Reading about TDD with no proper knowledge about unit testing is like teaching a baby to run before he can even walk :) About the book itself it is 90% unit testing and 10% TDD –  Songo Feb 22 '13 at 14:57
    
I don't intend to point anything but just a gentle suggestion, kindly add the word 'even' so that I read - Even if you wanna learn ... –  Manav Sharma Jul 25 '13 at 9:09
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I like video tutorials. The following videos are by the author of The Art Of Unit Testing by Roy Osherove:

Understanding Test Driven Development: http://osherove.com/videos/2009/8/25/understanding-test-driven-development.html

Unit Testing Best Practices: http://osherove.com/videos/2009/8/25/unit-testing-best-practices.html

Understanding Mock Objects http://osherove.com/videos/2009/8/25/tdd-understanding-mock-objects.html

(If you want to download high quality torrents of these videos go to http://osherove.com/blog/2009/8/19/ndc-2009-videos-torrent-file.html)

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Unfortunately it seems those videos hosted on viddler are set to private. –  Malice Sep 14 '11 at 16:07
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Ah.. they were there when I originally posted my answer. I've updated my answer with new links. –  User Sep 15 '11 at 15:39
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Thank you very much for the updated links! –  Malice Sep 15 '11 at 15:44
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The book "Working Effectively with Legacy Code" by Michael Feathers.

There is also an article from 2002 on the web, but it doesn't say much about testing.

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The bowling game episode, by Bob Martin. It's the transcript of the discussion of a pair of programmers implementing the scoring algorithm for the bowling game.

It's more about (Test-Driven Development), but TDD in based on unit-testing. The article shows how the developers first sketch out an UML diagram, start implementing and finally discover another design.

It obviously is not as exhaustive as "Test-Driven Development : by example", but it would be a good place to start.

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This was an awesome example, exactly the sort of thing I was asking for. This comes a little late since I've been reviewing some of my older questions. –  Soviut Mar 9 '09 at 7:11
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Although books, this two gems are a really easy read for beginners:

Pragmatic Unit Testing in Java with JUnit
Pragmatic Unit Testing in C# with NUnit

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I don't know if this is the kind of article you're after, but this article from MSDN Magazine is one of the articles that got me kick started into practical unit testing.

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While it is good, I seem to always find the 'Add 2 integers' method unit testing examples. Where are some good tutorials that bridge the gap between simple adding of 2 integers and full on TDD? For example some real world examples using database calls using Fakes instead or some other methods that take slightly more complex parameters like objects instead of simple value types? That would be helpful. –  atconway Feb 22 '13 at 14:06
    
Try this project: github.com/thePHPcc/bankaccount –  Nick Garvey Dec 4 '13 at 18:54
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Although it is not strictly a resource for beginners (but neither is, I think, the otherwise excellent "Working Effectively with Legacy Code"), I feel compelled to mention "xUnit Test Patterns" by Gerard Meszaros, which has some very good narratives about the benefits and constraints of unit testing, followed by a large catalog of patterns for keeping tests as they should be : simple, consistent across executions, readable, maintainable, etc. The book comes with a website on which most (if not all) of its contents are available at http://xunitpatterns.com/, although with a perhaps less practical layout than in the dead tree version.

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I started with CodeProject: Advanced Unit Testing and the other parts!

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Not trying to plug my own efforts, but I just completed a presentation at the recent NYC CodeCamp as an intro to TDD.

Even though I rarely recommend trying TDD as a way to get started with unit testing (TDD I find to be simpler to grasp AFTER you have written at least SOME unit test), you might still find these links related to the content to be of use:

Post that contains links to the ppt slide deck and the code download This slide deck contains an intro to unit testing, an understanding of why testing is important and the role it plays in the process.

Post that contains links to the recorded screencasts of the content From the screencasts, I recommend viewers select '#3 Studio Re-Recording' from the list provided as its the most concise.

If you are interested in reading a book, I personally found the previously-recommended 'Pragmatic Unit Testing in C# with NUnit' to be very approachable and great mix of concept with technical practice (which is usually the case with the 'Prag' series).

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This excerpt from Robert Martin's Agile Software Development book is a good read and illustrates a session of pair programming and test-driven development:

http://www.objectmentor.com/resources/articles/xpepisode.htm

You also may want to take a look at this: http://jbrains.ca/permalink/208

rant

BTW, despite the flak Martin is currently getting from Joel and Jeff, I recommend his book. The principles in this book help writing cleaner code. You just shouldn't try to apply all those principles a priori, but only when the actual need arises. This point is often overlooked by the "architecture astronauts", who end up creating more complicated code than need be.

rant off

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Indeed. J&J seem to overlook the possibility that making customers happy might be easier if Agile practices were applied. That's OK, I guess - they're only human and it gives us reasons to shout at our MP3 players. –  Mike Woodhouse Feb 2 '09 at 22:28
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I found this one to be really good quite recent upto date with JUnit4

Writing JUnit Tests in NetBeans IDE

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Simply learning Unit Testing might make you think how all this fits in the entire process. Make sure you pick a unit testing tool that is commonly used in the enterprise world along with a very simple mocking framework. I would also suggest you to read Test Driven Development: By Example, and keep the documentation of your test and mocking framework handy. This is a very interesting podcast that you might want to listen.

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Several good resources already posted - I think it's worth making sure that you differentiate between unit tests written after the code is built and tests written before. The former is more "traditional", intended to confirm that the code does what you think it's supposed to do, whereas the latter is more of a design tool, specifying in executable form what the code is expected to do.

Irrespective of your (or Joel's or Jeff's) opinion on the benefits or otherwise of the two approaches, keep in mind that they exist for different reasons and work in different ways. Heck, they often produce radically different code. So whatever your preference, figure out which direction any particular article is coming from, if only to minimise confusion!

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My recommended book for this: JUnit in Action Second Edition

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Here is a great tutorial I found on Script Junkie:

Unit Testing 101: Are You Testing Your JavaScript?

It focuses on unit testing Javascript, but the concepts it explains are universal. First it explains "log" debugging (print statements, log message or alerts). Then it goes on to explain how unit testing replaces this and makes tests repeatable, reducing the possibility of regression. Then it explains why you'd want to adjust your code to be more testable. Finally, it explains test driven development.

Additionally, because Javascript is often viewed as "too simple to test", I think this tutorial will open a lot of eyes to just how easy it is to make unit tests and testable code in Javascript.

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