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Is there a way to detect at compile-time if the compiler supports certain features of C++11? For example, something like this:

#ifndef VARIADIC_TEMPLATES_SUPPORTED

#error "Your compiler doesn't support variadic templates.  :("

#else

template <typename... DatatypeList>
class Tuple
{
    // ...
}

#endif
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1  
You could have a header called "assert_variadic_template_support.hpp" that you can include and within do something like template <typename... Test> struct compiler_must_support_variadic_templates;. A syntax error would quickly reveal the problem. (Just as an aside, a proper error message is much better.) –  GManNickG Feb 19 '11 at 0:53
    
The 'right' way to solve this problem is a configure test. –  Joseph Garvin Dec 18 '11 at 2:40

4 Answers 4

up vote 27 down vote accepted

Boost.Config has a plethora of macros that can be used to test for support for specific C++11 features.

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How do they work? Or is it just the typical Boost black magic? –  Maxpm Feb 19 '11 at 4:11
    
@Maxpm: For the most part, the maintainers of Boost just keep track of which compilers support what features and update the macros for each release. It's pretty easy to detect what compiler you're compiling on. It's nothing exciting, really: it just takes time to put together the list of who supports what. –  James McNellis Feb 19 '11 at 4:13
17  
and that's why it's so cumbersome that we're thankful it's provided :) –  Matthieu M. Feb 19 '11 at 11:38

There is a constant named __cplusplus that C++ compilers should set to the version of the C++ standard supported, see http://www.stroustrup.com/C++11FAQ.html#11

#if __cplusplus <= 199711L
  #error This library needs at least a C++11 compliant compiler
#endif

It is set to 199711L in Visual Studio 2010 SP1, but I do not know if vendors will be so bold to increase it already if they just have (partial) compiler-level support versus a standard C++ library with all the C++11 changes.

So Boost's defines mentioned in another answer remain the only sane way to figure out if there is, for example, support for C++11 threads and other specific parts of the standard.

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6  
C++11 sets the value of __cplusplus to 201103L. That asserts full conformance to the 2011 standard; it doesn't tell you about partial conformance or compiler extensions. If __cplusplus is set to 201103L, then either the compiler fully conforms or it's lying to you. If it's not, then you can't really tell which features it supports. –  Keith Thompson May 16 '13 at 17:24
1  
g++ 4.7.x (and presumably newer) sets this when -std=c++11 option is specified (may also with -std=gnu++11). They do this, even though they are not quite feature complete (4.8 brings us a lot closer). Note - there is a gap between what the compiler supports and what's available in the standard library. Both 4.7.x & 4.8.x are currently missing regex support - but that's a library, not a compiler feature. –  Nathan Ernst May 16 '13 at 20:02

I just wrote a small test suite to check which C++11 features are supported by a specific compiler. However, this is of course a 'pre-compile-time' check.

https://github.com/sloede/cxx11tests

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Great test suite, exactly what I was looking for, thanks. –  donturner Sep 19 at 15:52
    
Great work ````````` –  Nikos Athanasiou Oct 1 at 7:20

In the traditional Linux/Unix world, autoconf is traditionally used to test for the presence of libraries and compiler features and bugs placing them into a config.h that you use in your files as needed.

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Yes autoconf can be used to test for features but it you must make it generate the appropriate macro for failure or successes that can then be tested by the code above. So by itself this answer adds no information. –  Loki Astari Feb 19 '11 at 3:26
1  
@LokiAstari: That's not how autoconf works. Autoconf provides macros that let you have your configure script compile a test source file and set the #define to 0 or 1 based on the success of the compilation. diverscuba23's answer provides information by pointing out the OP is reaching for a suboptimal solution to the real problem. –  Joseph Garvin Dec 18 '11 at 2:44

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