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Is there any elegant way to exploit the correct spacing feature of print numpy.array to get a 2D array, with proper labels, that aligns properly? For example, given an array with 4 rows and 5 columns, how can I provide the array and appropriately sized lists corresponding to the row and header columns to generate some output that looks like this?

      A   B   C   D   E
Z [[ 85  86  87  88  89]
Y  [ 90 191 192  93  94]
X  [ 95  96  97  98  99]
W  [100 101 102 103 104]]

If I naively try:

import numpy
x = numpy.array([[85, 86, 87, 88, 89], \
                 [90, 191, 192, 93, 94], \
                 [95, 96, 97, 98, 99], \
                 [100,101,102,103,104]])

row_labels = ['Z', 'Y', 'X', 'W']


print "     A   B   C   D   E"
for row, row_index in enumerate(x):
    print row_labels[row_index], row

I get:

      A   B   C   D   E
Z  [85  86  87  88  89]
Y  [90 191 192  93  94]
X  [95  96  97  98  99]
W  [100 101 102 103 104]

Is there any way i can get things to line up intelligently? I am definitely open to using any other library if there is a better way to solve my problem.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Assuming all matrix numbers have at most 3 digits, you could replace the last part with this:

print "     A   B   C   D   E"
for row_label, row in zip(row_labels, x):
    print '%s [%s]' % (row_label, ' '.join('%03s' % i for i in row))

Which outputs:

     A   B   C   D   E
Z [ 85  86  87  88  89]
Y [ 90 191 192  93  94]
X [ 95  96  97  98  99]
W [100 101 102 103 104]

Formatting with '%03s' results in a string of length 3 with left padding (using spaces). Use '%04s' for length 4 and so on. The full format string syntax is explained in the Python documentation.

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This is what I was looking for, thanks! –  williampli Feb 19 '11 at 19:25

Here's a way to leverage the array printing functions. I probably wouldn't use it, but it comes pretty close to meeting your requirements!

a = np.random.rand(5,4)
x = np.array('col1 col2 col3 col4'.split())
y = np.array('row1 row2 row3 row4 row5'.split())
b = numpy.zeros((6,5),object)
b[1:,1:]=a
b[0,1:]=x
b[1:,0]=y
b[0,0]=''
printer = np.vectorize(lambda x:'{0:5}'.format(x,))
print printer(b).astype(object)

[[     col1 col2 col3 col4]
 [row1 0.95 0.71 0.03 0.56]
 [row2 0.56 0.46 0.35 0.90]
 [row3 0.24 0.08 0.29 0.40]
 [row4 0.90 0.44 0.69 0.48]
 [row5 0.27 0.10 0.62 0.04]]
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This is also useful in general; thanks! –  williampli Feb 19 '11 at 19:25

You can use IPython notebook + Pandas for that. Type your original example in IPython notebook:

import numpy
x = numpy.array([[85, 86, 87, 88, 89], 
                 [90, 191, 192, 93, 94], 
                 [95, 96, 97, 98, 99], 
                 [100,101,102,103,104]])

row_labels = ['Z', 'Y', 'X', 'W']
column_labels = ['A', 'B', 'C', 'D', 'E']

Then create a DataFrame:

import pandas
df = pandas.DataFrame(x, columns=column_labels, index=row_labels)

And then view it:

enter image description here

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