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I am creating an abstract class. I want each of my derived classes to be forced to implement a specific signature of constructor. As such, I did what I would have done has I wanted to force them to implement a method, I made an abstract one.

public abstract class A
{
    abstract A(int a, int b);
}

However I get a message saying the abstract modifier is invalid on this item. My goal was to force some code like this.

public class B : A
{
    public B(int a, int b) : base(a, b)
    {
        //Some other awesome code.
    }
}

This is all C# .NET code. Can anyone help me out?

Update 1

I wanted to add some things. What I ended up with was this.

private A() { }

protected A(int a, int b)
{
    //Code
}

That does what some folks are saying, default is private, and the class needs to implement a constructor. However that doesn't FORCE a constructor with the signature A(int a, int b).

public abstract class A
{
    protected abstract A(int a, int b)
    {


    }
}

Update 2

I should be clear, to work around this I made my default constructor private, and my other constructor protected. I am not really looking for a way to make my code work. I took care of that. I am looking to understand why C# does not let you do this.

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It was a typo, (should have been int b) but my answer was very similar to Jamie which is why I deleted mine. –  BFree Feb 2 '09 at 21:49
    
Today POO worlds doesn't understand the concept of overriding a shared (constructors are shared methods, event if .net means it's not shared, in reality it's a shared method because you can call it everywhere and it doesn't need an instance). So overriding shared It's a strange feature that few languages (like Haskell) understand. –  Toto Nov 3 '11 at 23:01
1  
Do you live in a POO world? :) –  Aran Mulholland Dec 14 '11 at 3:05
    
@AranMulholland: I don't konw about you, but Toto an me, we live in planet Earth. And I am sure it is pretty object-oriented. –  sergiol Dec 21 '11 at 10:13
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8 Answers

up vote 35 down vote accepted

You cannot have an abstract constructor because abstract means you must override it in any non-abstract child class and you cannot override a constructor.

If you think about it, this makes sense, since you always call the constructor of the child class (with the new operator) and never the base class.

Generally speaking, the only way in C# to enforce a specific constructor signature is by using the new() generic constraint, which enforces the existence of a parameterless constructor for the type parameter.

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Change that constructor in class A to

protected A(int a, int b)
{
    // Some initialisation code here
}

Then your subclasses will have to use it, as there is no default constructor.

They can, however, still change the actual signature of the constructor. There is no way of forcing a subclass to use a specific signature for its constructor as far as I know. I'm pretty sure constructors can't be abstract.

What exactly do you need this for? We might be able to suggest a work around for this.

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I think they can add other constructors (with a different signature), but they'll be forced to implement at least the signature as defined in the protected "constructor". –  Thorsten Feb 2 '09 at 21:30
    
This answer does not accomplish what I want. –  Anthony D Feb 3 '09 at 18:40
8  
Still it is correct. Adjust what you want to reality ;) –  TomTom May 5 '10 at 19:32
    
This is pretty smart. –  Joel B Feb 16 '12 at 22:59
    
Does C# 6 change this rule with the primary constructors? –  PacMani Apr 12 at 10:23
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Although you can't override constructors, and therefore can't define an abstract constructor, you can place an abstract factory method in your abstract base class. All the derived classes would need to override that.

public abstract class A 
{ 
    abstract A MakeAInstance(int a, int b); 
} 

public class B : A 
{ 
    // Must implement:
    override A MakeAInstance(int a, int b) {
        // Awesome way to create a B instance goes here
    }
} 
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3  
but in this case you must first create an instance of class B to be able to call the method MakeAInstance and get a new one –  DkAngelito Aug 5 '11 at 22:18
1  
Yes, exactly, or one must be passed to your code that then calls instance.MakeAInstance(1,2) –  John Saunders Aug 5 '11 at 23:13
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Multiple reasons:

1) Constructors are not inherited thus you cannot override them.

2) The constructor is a static member function since it dont need a specific instance to be called. Abstract implies "virtual" which means that the implementation can vary depending on how a specific instance is subclassed, which is the opposite of the intention of the meaning of the "static" keyword.

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Welcome to StackOverflow! +1: I like answers that rely on logic instead of code. –  jmendeth Mar 29 '12 at 9:22
1  
I disagree with your statement of a constructor is a static member, it does need an instance to be called (since you can access instance methods, fields, etc.). The new keyword instanciates the object, and then the constructor gets called, the constructor itself doesn't "construct" the object. –  Matthew Apr 20 '12 at 15:54
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You cannot enforce constructor signature, as each derived class may (must!) define its own constructor(s), and they may take any parameters they like.

If you need to pass a given set of variables to an object of a derived class, define an abstract method which needs to be implemented by derived classes. If the classes do not implement the abstract method, you will get a compiler error.

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not sure if this helps - but i feel this would be a solution to your problem:

public class A
{
  public A(int a, int b)
  {
    DoSomething(int a, int b);
  }

  virtual public void DoSomething(int a, int b)
  {

  }
}

public class B : A
{
  override public void DoSomething(int a, int b)
  {
    //class specific stuff
  }
}

with the result that you can call a constructor with the required arguments in any derived class with the correct behaviour.

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calling overrides in constructor is not recommended. –  Tilak Feb 21 '12 at 9:05
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All subclasses always can specify their own constructor as long as they call a constructor of the superclass - so there is no way of forcing the a class to have a specific constructor (At least, that is the way it works in Java). You could see of using a factory pattern will get you somewhere - you could define a factory method in an interface - but you'll need a separate factory class as your abstract base class does not know the actual class of the object that needs to be created.

However: maybe adding a more concrete example of the issue you are having might prompt other/better responses. Are you looking for some generic instantiation code, or are you concerned specific settings on the abstract base class have to be done?

If you are just concerned about initialization that has to be done by the abstract class, create a method to do so, and document the usage of that method.

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2  
"that is the way it works in Java" - but he is not asking about Java... –  Aran Mulholland Dec 22 '11 at 2:00
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hope this will help some1 newb as i am i was looking to make a "normal" public class with a ctor that takes argument and then i needed to make it a child class so i needed an empty ctor for it.

i didnt know this before: i u make a protected ctor then the child class sees it but the rest of the program dont see it (i guess my confusion is since in asp.net i see all the protected in the aspx page which inherits from the cs...)

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Actually the .aspx and .aspx.cs both define the same class. So the .aspx page is not "inheriting" the class in the .aspx.cs code, (despite the fact that it is referred to in the <%Page%> directive as "Inherits") but is actually defining a partial to that same class. –  CptRobby Aug 22 '13 at 21:25
    
thx for the info :D –  bresleveloper Aug 26 '13 at 13:26
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