Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm writing a stored procedure that gets data for a whole screen. How can I re-use the result of one select to feed into a second select? This for performance reasons

Simplified Example: I have 4 tables

  1. Responsible
  2. Action (has foreign key to Responsible)
  3. Group (has foreign key to Responsible)
  4. Case (has foreign key to group)

The stored procedure gets a caseid to retrieve the data

First select gets the details of the case, group and its related responsible record:

select 
   Case.Date,
   Case.Name,
   Group.Name,
   Responsible.Name
   Responsible.ResponsibleID
from Case
inner join Group on Group.GroupID=Case.GroupID
inner join Responsible on Responsible.ResponsibleID=Group.ResponsibleID
where CaseID=@CaseID

Second select must get all actions that the responsible is assigned to. We only have the caseID and therefor we must reconstruct the joins again:

select Action.*  
from Case
inner join Group on Group.GroupID=Case.GroupID
inner join Responsible on Responsible.ResponsibleID=Group.ResponsibleID
inner join Action  on Action.ResponsibleID=Responsible.ResponsibleID
where CaseID=@CaseID

If it would be possible to reuse the variable from the previous result it would be possible to create the following query which would probably be better for performance:

Select * from Action where ResponsibleID={ResultSet1}.ResponsibleID
share|improve this question
    
These queries look like they're no big deal even if you had a million cases-- what's the specific reason for optimizing them? –  Andomar Feb 19 '11 at 16:01
    
Due to Slow performance (1-2 sec for a page load, too much linq-to-sql querying) i'm moving some screens to 1 stored procedure that fetches all data for that specific screen. While i'm at it i'm trying to make it as efficient as possible. the query above is a simplified example –  MichaelD Feb 20 '11 at 10:08

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Consider holding your results in a table variable. This will allow you to perform multiple SQL operations on that result set from your permanent tables.

DECLARE @Case TABLE
(
    [CaseDate] datetime,
    [CaseName]  varchar(100),
    [GroupName] varchar(100),
    [ResponsibleName] varchar(100),
    [ResponsibleID] int
)

--get all your case details
INSERT INTO @Case( [CaseDate],[CaseName],
                   [GroupName],[ResponsibleName],[ResponsibleID])
SELECT 
   Case.Date,
   Case.Name,
   Group.Name,
   Responsible.Name
   Responsible.ResponsibleID
FROM      Case
INNER JOIN Group ON Group.GroupID=Case.GroupID
INNER JOIN Responsible ON Responsible.ResponsibleID=Group.ResponsibleID
WHERE CaseID=@CaseID


--now get the Action details for the previous case; 
--are we absolutely sure there is only one row? then an INNER JOIN 
SELECT A.*  
FROM   Action  AS [A] 
INNER JOIN @Case AS C ON A.ResponsibleID=C.ResponsibleID

-- or guard against multiple results in @Case
SELECT A.* FROM Action AS [A] 
WHERE A.ResponsibleID = (SELECT TOP 1 ResponsibleID FROM @Case) 
share|improve this answer
    
Is this the only way to fetch the result? I'm a little worried about the development overhead. Adding 1 column to the select will result 3 changes. The real query hold over 50 columns –  MichaelD Feb 20 '11 at 10:00

If you are getting data for various parts of the screen at the same time, just run a single query. Yes - you will get the same data in the leading columns, but that is the tradeoff against going to the database server twice.

select
   [Case].Date,
   [Case].Name CaseName,
   [Group].Name GroupName,
   Responsible.Name ResponsibleName,
   Responsible.ResponsibleID,
   Action.*
from [Case]
inner join [Group] on [Group].GroupID=[Case].GroupID
inner join Responsible on Responsible.ResponsibleID=[Group].ResponsibleID
inner join Action  on Action.ResponsibleID=Responsible.ResponsibleID
where [Case].CaseID=@CaseID

Other things I noticed about your query

  • Case is a reserved word. Use a different name, but I think that's not the real table name
  • Group is also a reserved word.
  • Name appears multiple times in the SELECT clause. Alias them so that the front end can access them predictably, instead of using the column position
  • If we are merging the queries, make sure to list out (and alias if required) the columns from Action.* so as not to clash with the other columns
share|improve this answer
    
You are correct. Case & Group are just example names. it's a little bit pseudo code to illustrate the problem. Thx for your input.The other answer is the answer to the question but yours may be more efficient when dealing with situations like the example.However If there are more tables like the action table , the result may get very big. –  MichaelD Feb 20 '11 at 9:58

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.