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What happens if a child thread's call back method existed in an Activity that was destroyed or that is now NOT the Activity at the top of the stack? WIll this cause and exception? if so, what is the best practice to deal with this kind of issue? Thanks!

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3 Answers 3

up vote -1 down vote accepted

You should make your thread work like this:

class Job extends Thread {
    Activity activity;
    boolean needsFinishing;

    Job(Activity activity) {
        this.activity = activity;
    }

    synchronized void detachActivity() {
        activity = null;
    }

    synchronized void attachActivity(Activity activity) {
        this.activity = activity;
        if (needsFinishing) {
            finished();
        }
    }

    public void run() {
        // do long running job

        finished();
    }

    synchronized void finished() {
        if (activity != null) {
            needsFinishing = false;
            activity.runOnUiThread(new Runnable() {
                public void run() {
                    // do your stuff with the activity
                }
            });
        } else {
            needsFinishing = true;
        }
    }
}

And the Activity:

class MyActivity extends Activity {
    Job job;

    void onCreate(Bundle bundle) {
        job = (Job) getNonConfigurationInstance();
    }

    void onResume() {
        if (job != null) {
            job.attachActivity(this);
        }
    }

    void onPause() {
        if (job != null) {
            job.detachActivity();
        }
    }

    Object onRetainNonConfigurationInstance() {
        return job;
    }

    // create and start your job somewhere between onCreate and onPause
}

This will make sure the thread only accesses the activity when appropriate. It will handle orientation changes, too. Note, the code is not perfect as I don't have a java/android environment handy to check for errors.

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I forgot to add: make sure your thread class does not have a reference to your activity, so make it a top level or static inner class. Also, you might want to use an AsyncTask instead of Thread which can result in a bit cleaner code. –  Szabolcs Berecz Feb 19 '11 at 17:19
    
Yes I think I will use AsynTask. Thanks for showing me an example. I will actually be using the detachActivity() concept as well. That will help the child thread know where, if to at all, post the result. –  Sergio Bernales Feb 21 '11 at 4:21
    
@Sergio Bernales If this answer is useful for you, consider upvoting it or even accept it as an answer. –  fiction Feb 21 '11 at 8:17
    
accepted as a possible answer (can't upvote, not enough rep) –  Sergio Bernales Mar 21 '11 at 0:59

You can use Future class to if you want to monitor when the task is completed.

Other alternative is to post tasks in a Handler and if you just want to stop them to use RemoveCallback(Runnable r)

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Thanks, good to know about the Future class. Although, i do not think it will work in my case because the Future class requires a get() call to retrieve the result. It seems that this would cause the UI thread to be responsible for retrieving the result therefore defeating the purpose of spawning a child thread so that the UI thread can be free. But i will definitely be using the Handler class. THanks again! –  Sergio Bernales Feb 21 '11 at 4:15

you can also maintain you that code snippet in a centric class which is a non-activity and a simple .java class

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Downvoted for non using capital letters, nor simple form of grammatic. Also it is not a real answer. –  fiction Feb 19 '11 at 16:49

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