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I am newbie programmer C/C++. Was learning pointers and character pointers and was trying to solve an exercise problem. Problem statement

Given a sentence " World is a great place to live in"

Problem description: Rearrange the given sentence based on the ascending order of its word length

output should be " A is in to live world great place"

I am trying my best and am pasting the code that I wrote, but not able to arrive at the answer. Can somebody point out the errors. I am sure there are lots.

#include <iostream>    
#include <string.h>

using namespace std;
char* breakIntoWords(char *,char*pt);

    int getwordcount(char* p)
    {
     int wc = 0;

     while(*p == ' ')
      {
         p++;
      }
      while( 1) {

      while( *p != ' ' && *p != '\0' && *p !='\n')
      { 
        p++;

      }
    if(*p ==  ' ')
    {
       p++;
    }
    else{
       break;
    }


      wc++;
      }
    wc++;
      return wc;

    }

    int main()
    {

       char bsentence[120][5];
       char sentence[120];
        cout<<"Ent&er STring"<<endl;
        char *p ;
        p = "Test it again and welcome";
        strcpy(sentence, p);
        int wordcount =0;
        wordcount=getwordcount(sentence);
        char *pt = sentence;
        for(int i =0; i <wordcount; i++)
        {

         pt = breakIntoWords(pt,bsentence[i]);
        }



           for(int i =0; i< wordcount; i++)
        {
          for(int j=i; j<i;  j++)
           {
              int one = strlen(bsentence[i]);
              int two = strlen(bsentence[i+1]);

            if(one > two)
               {
                   char temp[120];
                   strcpy(temp,bsentence[i]);
                   strcpy(bsentence[i+1],temp);


           }

            }

        }
    char sen2[12];
     for(int i=0; i<wordcount; i++)
      {

          strcat(sen2,bsentence[i++]);
          strcat(sen2, " ");
       }
       strcpy(sentence,sen2);




        cout<<sentence;

    }
    char* breakIntoWords(char*p, char*pt)
    {
       int i =  0, j = 0;
      while( *p != ' ')
      {
       pt[i] = *p++;
       i++;

      }
      p++;
      pt[i]='\0';

      return p;
    }

Without using String class.

I have solved it finally. Any inputs on improving it is welcome.

    #include<iostream>
#include<stdio.h>
#include<stdlib.h>
#include<string.h>

#define MAX_WORD_SIZE 30
#define MAX_LINE_SIZE 100
using namespace std;

int getWordCount(char* s)
{
   int wc = 0;
   while(*s == ' ')
     s++;
   while(*s != '\n')
   {
      while(*s != ' ' && *s != '\n')
      {
         s++;
       }

       if(*s == ' ')
       {
         while(*s == ' ')
            s++;
       }
       wc++;
   }
   return wc;
}
char* getWord(char* Source, char* word)
{
     while(*Source == ' ')
         Source++;
      int i =0;
      while(*Source != ' ' && *Source != '\n')
      {
         word[i] = *Source;
         Source++;i++;
       }
       word[i]='\0';
       if(*Source == ' ')
       {
         while(*Source == ' ')
            Source++;
       }
       return Source;


}
void sortSentence(char* p[], int wc)
{
   char *temp = new char[MAX_WORD_SIZE];
   for(int i =0; i<wc; i++)
   {
      for(int j = i; j< (wc-1); j++)
       {
           if(strlen(p[j]) > strlen(p[j+1]))
            {
                strcpy(temp,p[j]);
                strcpy(p[j],p[j+1]);
                strcpy(p[j+1],temp); 
             }
        }
    }
    delete[] temp;
}
int main()
{

 char* string;
 string = new char[MAX_LINE_SIZE];
 cout<<"Enter Sentence"<<endl;
 fgets(string,MAX_LINE_SIZE,stdin);
 int wordCount = getWordCount(string);
 char* pArrayOfPointers[30];
 char* tempString = string;
 for(int i =0; i< wordCount; i++)
 {
    char *ptemp;
      ptemp =new char[MAX_WORD_SIZE];
    pArrayOfPointers[i]= ptemp;
    tempString = getWord(tempString,pArrayOfPointers[i]);
    cout<<pArrayOfPointers[i]<<endl;          
  }
  sortSentence(pArrayOfPointers, wordCount);

  strcpy(string,pArrayOfPointers[0]);
  strcat(string," ");
  for(int i =1; i< wordCount; i++)
  {
     strcat(string,pArrayOfPointers[i]);
     strcat(string," ");

   }
   cout<<string;
 delete[] string;


}
share|improve this question
8  
There are a couple of conventions you should be aware of: 1) try to format your code correctly-- inconsistent braces and random whitespace just make things hard to read. 2) Don't just dump your code and say "what's wrong?", tell us what's not working, and what you've tried. –  Beta Feb 19 '11 at 16:51
1  
Hint: You can write less code by using multisets! –  Amokrane Chentir Feb 19 '11 at 16:55
2  
Since you're using strcpy and strcat, I assume you're allowed use standard library functions - look into using strtok to separate the input string, strlen to get the lengths –  Sam Dufel Feb 19 '11 at 16:58
    
Removed C tag as the OP is clearly writing in C++. –  Puppy Feb 19 '11 at 17:01
1  
I might be wrong but I believe that in C++ one has to include cstring and not string.h. Can anyone confirm ? –  ereOn Feb 19 '11 at 17:09

1 Answer 1

up vote 9 down vote accepted

Your code is vastly more complex than necessary because you’re not decomposing the problem into smaller tasks that would be easier to tackle.

Basically there are three steps:

  1. Decompose sentence into an array of words.
  2. Sort array of words by length.
  3. Output words, separated by spaces.

Each of these tasks is trivial in C++ and doesn’t require pointers or anything like that (which is a good thing. Pointers have their place in C but only rarely in C++).

For example, the first step can be solved using C++ IO streams and the vector container:

std::vector<std::string> words;

std::string word;
while (cin >> word)
    words.push_back(word);

This reads individual words from the standard input and stores them in a vector.

The second step can should be solved using the C++ standard library sort function.

The third step is a mere matter of iterating over the vector and pushing the words to the cout stream.

All in all, this shouldn’t take more than 15 lines of code.

If you don’t want to use a string class, your first step should be to write one. It doesn’t have to be fancy, but it should at least take care of the rudimentary mechanisms of handing the string’s memory, reading from input and writing to output.

share|improve this answer
2  
+1 for the general approach. He specified that he couldn't use std::string, but the basic principle of decomposition still applies. –  Karl Bielefeldt Feb 19 '11 at 17:05
3  
I agree about breaking the task into smaller tasks, but if the point is to learn about pointers and arrays, then the OP should not use vector. Every student should learn to handle the old tools before advancing to the new ones. –  Beta Feb 19 '11 at 17:06
2  
@Beta “Every student should learn to handle the old tools before advancing to the new ones” – Sorry but this is the wrong approach to learning. I know that a lot of people claim learning must be bottom up but these people have no clue whatsoever of didactics. –  Konrad Rudolph Feb 19 '11 at 17:15
1  
I respectfully disagree. I am a capable engineer and scientist and an accomplished teacher (although I admit I had to look up "didactics"). I wouldn't require a C/C++ student to learn the slide rule or assembler language, but I would require an exercise like this, at least once. I've lost count of the engineers I've worked with who used the latest, fanciest tools and always made a mess of things because they didn't understand the underlying logic. –  Beta Feb 19 '11 at 17:29
5  
@Beta But the order is wrong. First learn the high-level tools, then how their intestins work. After all, school children don’t start with Peano’s axioms in mathematics, or quantum mechanics in biology. They start with high-level processes that are easily understood and applied before broadening and deepening their knowledge. –  Konrad Rudolph Feb 19 '11 at 17:33

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