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I tried disassembling a C# created executable, but I couldn't come to a conclusion. What I'd like to know is that if for the CLR c#'s delegates are really special entities or just a compiler sugar?

I ask this because I'm implementing a language that compiles to C#, and it would be much more interesting for me to compile anonymous functions as classes than as delegates. But I don't want to use a design that later I will regret, as they might be heavier on memory (I think of Java's PermGen to base my questioning on. Even though I know there is no such thing for the CLR).

Thank you!

--edit

to be a little more clear, I'd like to know if there is (and what are) the differences between:

void Main()
{
    Func<int, int, int> add = delegate(int a, int b) {return a + b;};
}

and, for example

class AnonFuncion__1219023 : Fun3
{
    public override int invoke(int a, int b)
    {
        return a + b;
    }
}

-- edit

I think that there might be a great difference between:

class Program
{
    static int add(int a, int b)
    {
        return a + b;
    }

    static void Main()
    {
        Func<int, int, int> add = Program.add;
    }
}

and

class Function__432892 : Fun3
{
    public override int invoke(int a, int b)
    {
        return Program.add(a, b);
    }
}

I read somewhere, though, that the syntax Func<int, int, int> add = Program.add; is only a sugar for Func<int, int, int> add = delegate(int a, int b) { return Program.add; };. But I really don't know if that's really true. I could also see that the C# compiler already caches all those instances so they are constructed only once. I could do the same with my compiler, though.

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5 Answers 5

up vote 7 down vote accepted

I'm surprised you couldn't come to a conclusion by disassembling an executable. Let's take a look at something really simple:

        using System;

        class A
        {
          int _x;

          public A(int x)
          {
            _x = x;
          }

          public void Print(int y)
          {
            Console.WriteLine(_x + y);
          }
        }

        interface IPseudoDelegateVoidInt
        {
          void Call(int y);
        }


        class PseudoDelegateAPrint : IPseudoDelegateVoidInt
        {
          A _target;
          public PseudoDelegateAPrint(A target)
          {
            _target = target;
          }

          public void Call(int y)
          {
            _target.Print(y);
          }
        }



        class Program
        {
          delegate void RealVoidIntDelegate(int x);
          static void Main()
          {
            A a = new A(5);
            IPseudoDelegateVoidInt pdelegate = new PseudoDelegateAPrint(a);
            RealVoidIntDelegate rdelegate = new RealVoidIntDelegate(a.Print);
            pdelegate.Call(2);
            rdelegate(2);
          }
        }

If we disassemble this we get

        //  Microsoft (R) .NET Framework IL Disassembler.  Version 4.0.30319.1
        //  Copyright (c) Microsoft Corporation.  All rights reserved.



        // Metadata version: v4.0.30319
        .assembly extern mscorlib
        {
          .publickeytoken = (B7 7A 5C 56 19 34 E0 89 )                         // .z\V.4..
          .ver 4:0:0:0
        }
        .assembly del
        {
          .custom instance void [mscorlib]System.Runtime.CompilerServices.CompilationRelaxationsAttribute::.ctor(int32) = ( 01 00 08 00 00 00 00 00 ) 
          .custom instance void [mscorlib]System.Runtime.CompilerServices.RuntimeCompatibilityAttribute::.ctor() = ( 01 00 01 00 54 02 16 57 72 61 70 4E 6F 6E 45 78   // ....T..WrapNonEx
                                                                                                                     63 65 70 74 69 6F 6E 54 68 72 6F 77 73 01 )       // ceptionThrows.
          .hash algorithm 0x00008004
          .ver 0:0:0:0
        }
        .module del.exe
        // MVID: {87A2A843-A5F2-4D40-A96D-9940579DE26E}
        .imagebase 0x00400000
        .file alignment 0x00000200
        .stackreserve 0x00100000
        .subsystem 0x0003       // WINDOWS_CUI
        .corflags 0x00000001    //  ILONLY
        // Image base: 0x0000000000B60000


        // =============== CLASS MEMBERS DECLARATION ===================

        .class private auto ansi beforefieldinit A
               extends [mscorlib]System.Object
        {
          .field private int32 _x
          .method public hidebysig specialname rtspecialname 
                  instance void  .ctor(int32 x) cil managed
          {
            // Code size       17 (0x11)
            .maxstack  8
            IL_0000:  ldarg.0
            IL_0001:  call       instance void [mscorlib]System.Object::.ctor()
            IL_0006:  nop
            IL_0007:  nop
            IL_0008:  ldarg.0
            IL_0009:  ldarg.1
            IL_000a:  stfld      int32 A::_x
            IL_000f:  nop
            IL_0010:  ret
          } // end of method A::.ctor

          .method public hidebysig instance void 
                  Print(int32 y) cil managed
          {
            // Code size       16 (0x10)
            .maxstack  8
            IL_0000:  nop
            IL_0001:  ldarg.0
            IL_0002:  ldfld      int32 A::_x
            IL_0007:  ldarg.1
            IL_0008:  add
            IL_0009:  call       void [mscorlib]System.Console::WriteLine(int32)
            IL_000e:  nop
            IL_000f:  ret
          } // end of method A::Print

        } // end of class A

        .class interface private abstract auto ansi IPseudoDelegateVoidInt
        {
          .method public hidebysig newslot abstract virtual 
                  instance void  Call(int32 y) cil managed
          {
          } // end of method IPseudoDelegateVoidInt::Call

        } // end of class IPseudoDelegateVoidInt

        .class private auto ansi beforefieldinit PseudoDelegateAPrint
               extends [mscorlib]System.Object
               implements IPseudoDelegateVoidInt
        {
          .field private class A _target
          .method public hidebysig specialname rtspecialname 
                  instance void  .ctor(class A target) cil managed
          {
            // Code size       17 (0x11)
            .maxstack  8
            IL_0000:  ldarg.0
            IL_0001:  call       instance void [mscorlib]System.Object::.ctor()
            IL_0006:  nop
            IL_0007:  nop
            IL_0008:  ldarg.0
            IL_0009:  ldarg.1
            IL_000a:  stfld      class A PseudoDelegateAPrint::_target
            IL_000f:  nop
            IL_0010:  ret
          } // end of method PseudoDelegateAPrint::.ctor

          .method public hidebysig newslot virtual final 
                  instance void  Call(int32 y) cil managed
          {
            // Code size       15 (0xf)
            .maxstack  8
            IL_0000:  nop
            IL_0001:  ldarg.0
            IL_0002:  ldfld      class A PseudoDelegateAPrint::_target
            IL_0007:  ldarg.1
            IL_0008:  callvirt   instance void A::Print(int32)
            IL_000d:  nop
            IL_000e:  ret
          } // end of method PseudoDelegateAPrint::Call

        } // end of class PseudoDelegateAPrint

        .class private auto ansi beforefieldinit Program
               extends [mscorlib]System.Object
        {
          .class auto ansi sealed nested private RealVoidIntDelegate
                 extends [mscorlib]System.MulticastDelegate
          {
            .method public hidebysig specialname rtspecialname 
                    instance void  .ctor(object 'object',
                                         native int 'method') runtime managed
            {
            } // end of method RealVoidIntDelegate::.ctor

            .method public hidebysig newslot virtual 
                    instance void  Invoke(int32 x) runtime managed
            {
            } // end of method RealVoidIntDelegate::Invoke

            .method public hidebysig newslot virtual 
                    instance class [mscorlib]System.IAsyncResult 
                    BeginInvoke(int32 x,
                                class [mscorlib]System.AsyncCallback callback,
                                object 'object') runtime managed
            {
            } // end of method RealVoidIntDelegate::BeginInvoke

            .method public hidebysig newslot virtual 
                    instance void  EndInvoke(class [mscorlib]System.IAsyncResult result) runtime managed
            {
            } // end of method RealVoidIntDelegate::EndInvoke

          } // end of class RealVoidIntDelegate

          .method private hidebysig static void  Main() cil managed
          {
            .entrypoint
            // Code size       45 (0x2d)
            .maxstack  3
            .locals init (class A V_0,
                     class IPseudoDelegateVoidInt V_1,
                     class Program/RealVoidIntDelegate V_2)
            IL_0000:  nop
            IL_0001:  ldc.i4.5
            IL_0002:  newobj     instance void A::.ctor(int32)
            IL_0007:  stloc.0
            IL_0008:  ldloc.0
            IL_0009:  newobj     instance void PseudoDelegateAPrint::.ctor(class A)
            IL_000e:  stloc.1
            IL_000f:  ldloc.0
            IL_0010:  ldftn      instance void A::Print(int32)
            IL_0016:  newobj     instance void Program/RealVoidIntDelegate::.ctor(object,
                                                                                  native int)
            IL_001b:  stloc.2
            IL_001c:  ldloc.1
            IL_001d:  ldc.i4.2
            IL_001e:  callvirt   instance void IPseudoDelegateVoidInt::Call(int32)
            IL_0023:  nop
            IL_0024:  ldloc.2
            IL_0025:  ldc.i4.2
            IL_0026:  callvirt   instance void Program/RealVoidIntDelegate::Invoke(int32)
            IL_002b:  nop
            IL_002c:  ret
          } // end of method Program::Main

          .method public hidebysig specialname rtspecialname 
                  instance void  .ctor() cil managed
          {
            // Code size       7 (0x7)
            .maxstack  8
            IL_0000:  ldarg.0
            IL_0001:  call       instance void [mscorlib]System.Object::.ctor()
            IL_0006:  ret
          } // end of method Program::.ctor

        } // end of class Program


        // =============================================================

        // *********** DISASSEMBLY COMPLETE ***********************
        // WARNING: Created Win32 resource file C:\Users\logan\del.res

As you can see the RealVoidIntDelegate becomes "just" another class. They called it Invoke instead of Call, and they didn't use an interface but there are no special instructions involved, it is the same basic idea.

To elaborate a little bit on the idea of "lightweightness", delegates are not lighter weight than classes because a given delegate is a class. Especially in the case of function literal syntax, they really can't be much lighter weight. However for the "call this method on this object with these args" case invoking and creating a given delegate will probably be lighter weight then a home grown delegate when compiling down to C#.

share|improve this answer
    
Yeah, I admit I'm a IL newbie. I tried using ILDasm and it gave me an output like that: //000043: IntOper add1 = delegate(int x, int y) .line 48,54 : 13,15 '' //000044: { //000045: return x + y; //000046: }; –  Waneck Feb 19 '11 at 18:07
    
But I am sure I checked the wrong options for the disassembly ; ) Anyway, thanks for the detailed answer! –  Waneck Feb 19 '11 at 18:10
    
But looking at your disassembly, it calls to my attention ldftn there. It seems it's not creating a class for each anonymous function, but only for the delegate type declaration –  Waneck Feb 19 '11 at 18:12
1  
Right. This is where the sugaring comes in. In C++/CLI you would actually say gcnew RealVoidintDelegate(a, &A::Print) which perhaps makes it a little clearer. You can acheive a similar thing in C# with the reflection APIs, but this is why I created the interface. Each class/method combination would result in a new concrete class. In this case there is only one. The real C# delegate has a object member and (what amounts to) a Method member (it's really a slot index). –  Logan Capaldo Feb 19 '11 at 18:19
1  
I don't know if it is "just in this case", perhaps the compiler is smart enough to recognize code like delegate { a() } and optimize out the extra class, but yes in this case for sure (at least assuming you don't count the code in Delegate and MulticastDelagate and maybe even then). –  Logan Capaldo Feb 19 '11 at 19:32

Delegates are classes. .NET compiler creates a type for each delegate and the code must instantiate a delegate.

In any case, the difference in performance will be negligible unless you are writing one of the very rare applications where every nano second is important.

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There is no great mystery here. Channeling Jon Skeet...

If you have a look at 6.5.3 of the C# Specification you will see several examples of how anonymous delegates are treated by the compiler. A brief summary:

IF the anonymous method captures no outer variables,
THEN it can be created as a static method on the enclosing type.

IF the anonymous method references members of the enclosing type, e.g. this.x
THEN it can be created as an instance method on the enclosing type.

IF the anonymous method captures a local variable,
THEN it can be created as a nested Type within the enclosing type, with instance variables that match the captured variables, and an instance method that matches the delegate type.

The last example is more complicated and it is just easier to look at code. Have a look for yourself and I think it will eliminate all the guesswork.

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There seems to be very little difference between the two, the top snippet effectively gets compiled into something almost identical to what you have in the bottom snippet.

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Apart from meta-data, there really is no such thing as a class once everything gets JIT compiled. The run time representation of an object is an array of bytes large enough to store all of the fields of the class and it's base classes, plus an object header that stores a hash code, a numeric type identifier, and a pointer to a shared v-table that holds addresses of virtual function overrides.

A delegate is an object, whose class derives from System.Delegate. It stores an array of object and function pointer pairs.

An anonymous function is a function that has no name. However, they are also usually associated with an object, called a closure, that contains all the parameters and locals defined in the containing method that created the "anonymous delegate" that points at the anonymous function. (Actually it usually only contains those variable that are actually accessed).

In any case, moving the stack variables to the heap allows the anonymous delegate to out live it's defining stack frame.

The easiest way to associate an anonymous function with it's closure is to make it a method of the compiler generated closure class.

So,if you have lexical closures, you have to (at least in some cases) use a class to implement anonymous functions.

If you don't have lexical closures, then you can just emit the "anonymous function" as a regular function with a compiler generated name, next to the method that declared it. That's also a usefull optimization in cased where the language supports lexical closures, but one isn't needed.

In general, anonymous functions are not useful without closure support, so I wouldn't bother including them in your language without support for closures.

share|improve this answer
    
But anyway you can define a closure by yourself as a class, just by defining the captured variables as member class variables of this generated class. –  Waneck Feb 19 '11 at 18:45
    
also I can always resort to define the variables as arrays of length one, so to emulate having them defined in heap (though I don't know how it would perform) –  Waneck Feb 19 '11 at 18:57
    
What I was saying is that you don't have a choice. In the general case, You HAVE TO emit a class as part of compiling an anonymous function. –  Scott Wisniewski Feb 19 '11 at 20:34
    
If you are writing closures by hand, you don't need anonymous functions. You can use a named function for that, in the hand written closure you created. –  Scott Wisniewski Feb 19 '11 at 20:38

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