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Is there a way to change the root object in JavaScript?

For example, in browsers, the root object is "window". So

X = 5;
console.log(Y);

is the same as:

window.X = 5;
console.log(window.Y);

What I want to do now, is changing this root object, so when I do the following:

X = 6;

Reason why I need this:

In Node.js applications, every part of the program can access the global object. That's a big problem because every script that is executed by a Node.js webserver can add new variables to it. They will be there until the webserver is restarted. I want to avoid this by changing the global object.

Update

I've tested the following code and got a really interesting result. What did you expect of the following code?

var X = {A:"a",B:"b"};

with(X){
    A = 5;
    C = 7;
}
for(a in X){
    console.log(a+" is "+X[a]);
}

/* 
Expected Console Output:
A is 5
B is b
C is 7

Real Console Output:
A is 5;
B is b;

*/

Is there a way to get output as I expected it?

Update

I've now tested the module system with the following code.

//program.js
var t = require("./module.js");
t.Test();

console.log(A);

//module.js
A = 5;
exports.Test = function(){
    console.log("hello world!");
}

The output was:

hello world!
5

This tells me, that the variable "A" defined in module.js was added to the global object of program.js. The module does not solve my problem, either.

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1  
Proper term is not ROOT but Global, in browsers window implements Global –  Free Consulting Feb 19 '11 at 19:08

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

There is the with statement, but it is not recommended and forbidden in strict mode.

It is better to refer to the variable holding the object explicitly.

In response to updated question:

with will search up the scope chain until it finds an object with a matching property or gets to window. It is no good for defining new properties on an object.

var X = { A: 5, B: 8, C: 7};
with(X){
    console.log(A, B, C);
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! I totally forgot "with", it's exactly what i search for. It does not matter if it is forbidden or not. It must only run in the V8 engine, and it seems to work. –  Van Coding Feb 19 '11 at 18:24
    
Ok i was to fast... it does not work as I expected it. I updated my post. –  Van Coding Feb 19 '11 at 18:45
1  
@Flash: I'm certain I'm not as familiar with the with statement as @David, but it seems that with looks for a property in X, and if not found, it traverses the scope chain. If none are found, it creates global variables. It seems to use with, you'd need to first define those properties. var X = {A:null,B:null,C:null,D:"D"}; –  user113716 Feb 19 '11 at 18:55
    
Yes I found out the same thing. But thats a problem... I don't want do predefine the values. That would be senseless in my case. –  Van Coding Feb 19 '11 at 18:58
    
@Flash: I just updated my answer with another possibility. There are a number of ways to approach this. The simplest is to simply reference the object when adding properties (as David recommended in his answer). –  user113716 Feb 19 '11 at 18:59

If you're talking about variables, JavasScript has function scope.

X = 5;  // global variable

console.log( window.X );  // 5

(function() {
   var X = 6;  // declare a local variable by using the "var" keyword

   console.log( X );  // 6
})();

console.log( window.X );  // 5

Otherwise, you can create an Object, and add properties to it.

X = 5; 

console.log( window.X );  // 5

var obj = {};

obj.X = 6;

console.log( obj.X ); // 6

console.log( window.X );  // 5

EDIT: Adding another possible solution that could be used.

You could invoke an anonymous function, but set the context of the function to your X object. Then this in the function will refer to X.

var X = {};
(function(){
    this.A = 5;
    this.B = 8;
    this.C = 7;
}).call(X);
for(a in X){
    console.log(a+" is "+X[a]);
}

The .call() method (as well as the .apply() method) allow you to explicitly set the thisArgof a calling context. The first argument you pass will be howthis` is defined in the context of the invocation.

Or just pass X in as an argument.

var X = {};
(function(X){
    X.A = 5;
    X.B = 8;
    X.C = 7;
})(X);
for(a in X){
    console.log(a+" is "+X[a]);
}

Though the simplest is to simply reference it (as I noted in my answer above).

var X = {};
X.A = 5;
X.B = 8;
X.C = 7;
for(a in X){
    console.log(a+" is "+X[a]);
}

or use a module pattern:

   /****** I'm guessing at the use of "global" here ********/
global.myNamespace = (function(global,undefined) {

    // define the object to be returned
    var X = {};

    //  define private local variables
    var a_local = 'some value';
    var another_local = 'some other value';

    // define private functions
    function myFunc() {
        // do something with local variables
    }

    // give the return object public members
    X.someProperty = 'some value';
    X.anotherProperty = 'another value';
    X.publicFunc = function() {
        //do something with the local variables
        //    or public properties
    };
    X.anotherFunc = function() {
        //do something with the local variables
        //    or public properties
    };
    // return the object
    return X;

})(global);

console.log(myNamespace);
share|improve this answer
    
@Down-voter: Please explain. Which part of my answer is incorrect? –  user113716 Feb 19 '11 at 18:21
    
@David: Thanks for the response. Could you please explain which bit that is? I don't think OP is familiar with javascript, and as such when OP does X = 5, and sees it adding a property to window, I'm guessing an assumption is being made that that's how properties are generally added. Depending on the specific need, either of these solutions could be helpful IMO. –  user113716 Feb 19 '11 at 18:27
    
+1 no reason for the down vote. –  Sarfraz Feb 19 '11 at 18:28
    
+ 1 for a really good answer. But David's answer gets closest to my expected solution. –  Van Coding Feb 19 '11 at 19:06
    
BTW To explain why I wanted to do it like i posted it: In Node.js applications every part of the program can access the Global object. That's a big problem because every script that is executed by a Node.js Webserver can add new Variables to it. They will be there until the Webserver is restarted. I wanted to avoid this by changing the global object. –  Van Coding Feb 19 '11 at 19:17

Sorry, but for HTML pages at least, you cannot! You should probably use closures or namespaces!

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