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I'm having trouble solving this problem:

Create a function that given a character set C, can generate the Nth combination OR return the series of combination given a starting position (Ns) and ending position (Ne) and the maximum length of the combination (Mx).

A concrete example:

Let C = [A,B,C]

We know that different combinations would look like the following assuming Mx = 3 (the combination would be different for different lengths):

1. AAA
2. AAB
3. AAC
4. ABA
5. ABB
6. ABC
N. ... Etc

If we was to pass the following parameters :

C = [A,B,C] Mx = 3 Ns = 3 Ne = 3

we would expect the following result:

AAC

If we was to pass the following parameters :

C = [A,B,C] Mx = 3 Ns = 4 Ne = 6

we would expect the following result:

4. ABA
5. ABB
6. ABC

For the solution, the programming language is not relevant. However C# would be preferred. Also most important would be an explanation of how its solved.

I look forward to the amazing Guru's of Stack Overflow...

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is this homework? –  Femaref Feb 19 '11 at 18:29
    
No, its a very small part of a much bigger personal project. –  Darknight Feb 19 '11 at 18:41
    

1 Answer 1

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Given an index N (0-based) into the sequence of combinations of n symbols, you can get the i'th symbol by calculating N / ni % n (using integer division and remainder)

For example:

C = {A, B, C} (giving n = 3)
N = 6
i = 0 => 6 / 3^0 % 3 = 0 (symbol 0 = A)
i = 1 => 6 / 3^1 % 3 = 2 (symbol 2 = C)
i = 2 => 6 / 3^2 % 3 = 0 (symbol 0 = A)
Resulting sequence: ACA

The sequence is treated as a base-n number, and the individual digits are calculated.

share|improve this answer
    
Excellent, this is beautifully simple. this is exactly what I was looking for! I'm marking this this as solved. –  Darknight Feb 19 '11 at 18:55

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