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I'm trying to develop requests between my main domain (http://foo.com) ans my API (http://api.foo.com).

To bypass the restrictions about cross-subdomain stuff, I use an Iframe, on my main page (http.//foo.com/main.html), pointing on a page iframe.html there : scripts.api.foo.com.

(scripts.api.foo.com and foo.com are on the same server, api.foo.com on anothers)

>iframe.html :

<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD XHTML 1.0 Strict//EN" "http://www.w3.org/TR/xhtml1/DTD/xhtml1-strict.dtd">
    <html xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml" xml:lang="en">
       <head>
           <title>Iframe</title>
           <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" />
           <script type="text/javascript" src="http://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/1/jquery.min.js"></script>
       </head>
       <body>
        <script type="text/javascript">
    document.domain = 'foo.com';
    function testIframe()
    {
        $.ajax({
                    url: "http://api.foo.com/utctime",
                    timeout: 7000,
                    complete: function(jqXHR, textStatus){
                        parent.alert(jqXHR.status);}
                });
    }
        </script>
       </body>
    </html>

>main.html :

<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD XHTML 1.0 Strict//EN" "http://www.w3.org/TR/xhtml1/DTD/xhtml1-strict.dtd">
<html xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml" xml:lang="en">
   <head>
       <title>Test</title>
       <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" />
       <script type="text/javascript" src="http://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/1/jquery.min.js"></script>
   </head>
   <body>
    <script type="text/javascript">
document.domain = 'foo.com';
function test()
{
    pipeFrame.testIframe();
}
    </script>
    <iframe style="" src="http://scripts.api.foo.com/iframe.html" width="500" height="50" id="pipeFrame" name="pipeFrame"></iframe>
        <form>
           <p>
               <input type="button" value="Hop" onclick="test();" />
           </p>        
        </form>

   </body>
</html>

The alert window always contains "302" (Redirect) with Firefox 3.6/Chrome, "0" with IE8 ... Though Firebug tells me my request got a "200 Ok" status (and no response) ...

I've tried, directly on scripts.api.foo.com/iframe.html, to lauch the same request, and got the same status code.

I'm quite frustrated, after vainly searching all over the web a clear way to implement cross-subdomain, or an explanation about those status code ... Any help would be welcome.

Thanks a lots for your attention. Bye.

share|improve this question
up vote 4 down vote accepted

Unfortunately the rules for cross-domain requests also end up blocking requests that are within a subdomain even though technically it's the same server. You can either run through proxy or use a cross-domain hack to allow the $.ajax call to operate. There's a really good article on using iFrames and cross domain stuff here

http://softwareas.com/cross-domain-communication-with-iframes

share|improve this answer
4  
Well, I've already read this article, but wasn't able to really develop a solution from his theory ... And the proxy solution seems quite heavy to me. Cross-subdomain is a common problem for whoever try to develop services with a API ... How is it there's no consensus about how to solve it ? – Aldream Feb 19 '11 at 19:10

If you are only targeting modern browsers (eg, IE 8), you could implement the OPTIONS request. A modern browser will, before attempting to execute a cross-site GET request, send an OPTIONS request to the target (scripts.api.foo.com) to ask if it's OK to use their scripts on the source (foo.com). The web server can then send a response which says, Sure, you can use my scripts on foo.com.

http://www.w3.org/TR/cors/

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the information, but I'm seeking a more global solution ... Using Iframe seemed a quite good idea, but though I can establish communication between my main page (foo.com/main.html) and its Iframe (pointing on scripts.api.foo.com), the requests sent from scripts.api.foo.com don't reach my servers on api.foo.com ... I thought requests were allowed between a (sub-)subdomain and its (sub)domain, but it doesn't work here. (Is it because api.foo.com and scripts.api.foo.com aren't on the same host ?) Thanks for your help, and have a nice day. – Aldream Feb 21 '11 at 9:05
    
You can't get information back from the iframe in your main frame, because this is precisely what cross-site-scripting rules are intended to prevent. You can load URLs in the iframe, yes, but if you were able to read from it, you could also load a bank URL in the iframe and read back the user's bank information into your top-level frame. – Jack Saalwächter Feb 23 '11 at 4:54

The jQuery ajax function doesn't work by default with IE's equivalent to XHR CORS called XDR for XDomainRequest... Just add that before your first ajax call and it may work in your case...

$(document).ready(function(e) {
    // CORS + XDR for Internet Explorer
    if ('XDomainRequest' in window&&window.XDomainRequest!==null)
    {jQuery.ajaxSettings.xhr=function(){try{return new XDomainRequest();}
    catch(e){}}; jQuery.support.cors = true;}
});
share|improve this answer

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