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List<int> data=new List<int>();
foreach(int id in ids){
    var myThread=new Thread(new ThreadStart(Work));
    myThread.Start(id);
}


Work(){
}

Method Work does some processing on the received id and then adds the result to the data list? How can I add data to the collection from each thread? How would my code look like? thanks

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1  
You'd need to either manage locking the collection manually or use one of .NET's concurrent collections. I'd recommend using Tasks for simple stuff like this, though, it neatly manages a lot of the complexity that Threads cause and will introduce some great programming concepts (if you don't know them already) that are really helpful. –  Christopher Pfohl Feb 19 '11 at 19:06
    
As usual Jon thinks of the things I forget. You should definitely stick with his method. –  Christopher Pfohl Feb 19 '11 at 19:33
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3 Answers

up vote 7 down vote accepted

If you're using .NET 4, I strongly suggest you use Parallel Extensions instead. For example:

var list = ids.AsParallel()
              .Select(Work)
              .ToList();

where Work is:

public int Work(int id)
{
    ...
}

so that it can receive the id appropriately. If you're not keen on the method conversion, you could add a lambda expression:

var list = ids.AsParallel()
              .Select(id => Work(id))
              .ToList();

Either way, this will avoid creating more threads than you really need, and deal with the thread safety side of things without you having to manage the locks yourself.

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using AsParallel() works great but can I have more than 2 threds working in parallel –  Ryan Feb 21 '11 at 12:58
    
@Ryan: Absolutely. There are various ways of controlling the parallelization. Typically it will automatically scale itself to the number of cores you have available, but methods like WithDegreeOfParallelism can tweak things. –  Jon Skeet Feb 21 '11 at 13:41
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First of all, you need to protect your multithreaded access with a lock. Second, you need to pass the parameter to your thread (or use lambda which can capture the local variable; beware that if you capture loop variable, it will change the value during the loop, so you ought to have a local copy).

object collectionLock = new object();
List<int> data = new List<int>();

foreach (int id in ids)
{
    Thread t = new Thread(Worker);
    t.Start(id);
}

void Worker(object o)
{
    int id = (int)o;
    lock(collectionLock)
    {
        data.Add(id);
    }
}
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2  
WRT: "You cannot capture the loop variable" (It actually can be captured -- it's just always the same variable ;-) To get around that ... detail ... I use foreach (var _x in ...) { var x = _x; ... }, where it matters. –  user166390 Feb 19 '11 at 19:21
    
@pst: Yes, I meant exactly this. The captured variable is reused in the loop, so capturing it and using the naive way would bring unexpected behaviour. –  Vlad Feb 19 '11 at 19:26
    
@pst: edited the answer to make it more clear. Thanks for the suggestion! –  Vlad Feb 19 '11 at 19:31
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you can pass and retrieve data (using callbacks) from threads. See MSDN article.

Example:

    public class SomeClass
    {
        public static List<int> data = new List<int>();
        public static readonly object obj = new object();

        public void SomeMethod(int[] ids)
        {
            foreach (int id in ids)
            {
                Work w = new Work();
                w.Data = id;
                w.callback = ResultCallback; 
                var myThread = new Thread(new ThreadStart(w.DoWork));
                myThread.Start();
            }
        }

        public static void ResultCallback(int d)
        {        
            lock (obj)
            {        
                data.Add(d);
            }
        }

    }

    public delegate void ExampleCallback(int data); 
    class Work
    {
        public int Data { get; set; }
        public ExampleCallback callback;

        public void DoWork()
        {                
            Console.WriteLine("Instance thread procedure. Data={0}", Data);
            if (callback != null)
                callback(Data);
        }

    }
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Good idea on not sharing data to avoid locking. But you're missing the results! The part where you add something to the data list! –  R. Martinho Fernandes Feb 19 '11 at 19:24
1  
If the threads are pushing the result into the list, there's no way to avoid locking/synchronization (maybe implicit). If the main thread is going to pull the data from the worker threads, it needs to know when the worker finishes work. –  Vlad Feb 19 '11 at 19:29
    
@Martinho Fernandes @Vlad Thanks, I have updated it. –  Adeel Feb 19 '11 at 19:47
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