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I'm new to Java, and have been looking for a solution.. perhaps i'm not searching on the right terminology.

My goal: I have a Java class that uses webdriver to go to a page, perform a search... and output the results. The output results have plain text with URLs. All I care about are the URL's returned. So basically, I want to take my output like:

Search result 1 http://www.somesite.com/blahblah this is a site from the search results.

but all I want is the URL, i want to dump the rest of the output. I've looked into 'parsing in java' but not finding what i'm looking for. Any pointers would be much appreciated.

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Are your URLs guaranteed to start with "http://"? –  Richard H Feb 19 '11 at 19:22
    
Since you say the returned documents are plain (non-HTML) text, you don't really need a HTML parser; a regex solution like @Felix Ng's should do just fine. –  elo80ka Feb 19 '11 at 21:32
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2 Answers 2

Pattern pattern = Pattern.compile("http://[^\\s]*");
Matcher matcher = pattern
    .matcher("Search result 1 http://www.somesite.com/blahbl+ah1 this is a site from the search results.\nSearch result 1 http://www.somesite.com/blahblah2 this is a site from the search results.");

for (int begin = 0; matcher.find(begin); begin = matcher.end())
{
    System.out.println(matcher.group(0));
}
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Check out the regex package: http://download.oracle.com/javase/1.4.2/docs/api/java/util/regex/package-summary.html

There are other ways to parse of course, but going the regexp route is probably the cleanest.

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Or more specifically something like: http\\://[^ ]+ –  Johan Sjöberg Feb 19 '11 at 19:11
    
Thanks everyone! perfect. that's what I wanted. I didn't know about RegEx. But i'm hooked. this is really cool. I am passing the results as a variable as the.matcher() and then use that pattern you suggested... and bingo... all the URL's. perfect. thanks again! –  Brian Feb 20 '11 at 8:13
    
Don't forget detecting https too. There should be plenty of examples for advanced regexp detecting URLs in text if you just do a quick search here on stackoverflow.com. –  Nuoji Feb 20 '11 at 10:48
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