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Suppose the following code is run on single-core processor:

#include <cstdio>
#include <boost/thread.hpp>
#include <boost/thread/condition.hpp>
#include "boost/date_time/posix_time/posix_time.hpp"
#include <deque>
#include <cstdlib>
#include <time.h>

std::deque<int> buffer;
boost::mutex bufferMutex;

boost::condition bufferHasSome;
boost::condition bufferEmpty;

void Reader()
{
    boost::mutex mutex;
    boost::mutex::scoped_lock lock(mutex);

    //read as fast as possible:
    while(true)
    {
        while(buffer.size() <= 0) //1.1
        {
            bufferHasSome.wait(lock); //1.2
        }

        bufferMutex.lock();
        for(int i = 0; i < buffer.size(); i++)
        {
            printf("%d\n", buffer.front());
            buffer.pop_front();
        }
        bufferMutex.unlock();

        //everything was read:
        bufferEmpty.notify_one();
    }
}

void Writer()
{
    boost::mutex mutex;
    boost::mutex::scoped_lock lock(mutex);

    int index = 0;

    while(true)
    {
        //write portion:
        for(int i = rand() % 5; i >= 0; i--)
        {
            bufferMutex.lock();
            buffer.push_back(index);
            bufferMutex.unlock(); //2.1

            bufferHasSome.notify_one(); //2.2

            index++;
            boost::this_thread::sleep(boost::posix_time::milliseconds(rand() % 10));
        }

        //definetely wait while written portion will be read:
        while(buffer.size() > 0)
        {
            bufferEmpty.wait(lock);
        }
    }
}

int main()
{
    srand(time(NULL));

    boost::thread readerThread(Reader);
    boost::thread writerThread(Writer);

    getchar();

    return 0;
}

and processor stopped after 1.1 (where size = 0) within Reader thread and switched to Writer where index was added (2.1) into the buffer and bufferHasSome was notified (at 2.2) (but no one is waiting for it yet so it was just void operation); then processor switched back to Reader thread and started (at 1.2) to wait while somebody will write something to the buffer but only one who can write is waiting for somebody to read the buffer. This program freeze after averagely 150 iterations - I think it's because of this. What did I missed? How to fix it?

share|improve this question
    
There is at least one race condition in your program: you call buffer.size() without locking bufferMutex. –  James McNellis Feb 19 '11 at 20:55
    
As I know, deque::size() is thread-safe operation. Anyway, if I enclose size() to the code like this: bufferMutex.lock(); const int size = buffer.size(); bufferMutex.unlock(); it will not help. –  Slav Feb 19 '11 at 20:59
    
@Slev: Nothing on the standard library is necessarily thread-safe. –  GManNickG Feb 19 '11 at 21:15
    
I mean it's alright if size() will return some bad value - all data will be read properly (within mutex) anyway. –  Slav Feb 19 '11 at 21:35

4 Answers 4

I see a couple problems here. Most importantly, you're checking shared values (namely, buffer.size()) outside of a lock. Secondly, you have these weird mutexes local to each function which do absolutely nothing, since they're not shared between threads. If you lock the bufferMutex before checking buffer.size(), then wait on bufferMutex (meaning you'll unlock it, which is correct, then re-lock it when the thread is notified), I think the deadlock threat should be gone.

share|improve this answer
    
I moved the line "boost::mutex mutex;" to the global scope (and removed it from Reader and Writer functions) and deadlock does not happen anymore (buffer.size() is called without mutexes). Anyway, how does global mutex affect all boost::mutex::scoped_lock(s) created with it? Why deadlock does not happen anymore in a way as I expect? –  Slav Feb 19 '11 at 21:25
    
If the only change is that you moved the local mutex into the global scope, I don't think the code is optimal. It's correct, but only one thread will operate at a time - the writer will acquire the mutex, push some elements, then call bufferNotEmpty.wait, which will unlock the mutex. This will let the reader thread lock it, read all the elements, then wait on bufferNotEmpty. Therefore, this code is no longer concurrent. –  Josh Matthews Feb 20 '11 at 5:24

Presumably your writer is waiting for the reader to have finished reading before it writes again.

In any case you need just the one "global" mutex and should use that when waiting on your condition variables too.

The local mutexes have no effect.

I would also suggest that your main function join your two threads (I would use thread_group). You will also need some terminating condition for your loop. Maybe the writer will set a variable when it has completed and broadcast, and your reader thread will check that condition as well as checking the state of the queue.

share|improve this answer
    
Yes, moving boost::mutex mutex; to the global scope solved the problem (deadlock). But, anyway, I don't understand why. The possibility of deadlock still exist in the way as I explained. Weird. –  Slav Feb 19 '11 at 21:38
    
I cannot see your fix. You want one mutex instance for this collection. You must have it locked before waiting on your condition variable. –  CashCow Feb 20 '11 at 3:46

Not quite an answer to your question. The others seem to have alrdy started with that. I would like to suggest that you take a look at concurrent_bounded_queue in TBB. If you use that your code will be simplified and less error-prone.

#include <cstdio>
#include <cstdlib>
#include <time.h>

#include <boost/thread.hpp>
#include <boost/date_time/posix_time/posix_time.hpp>

#include <tbb/concurrent_queue.h>

tbb::concurrent_bounded_queue buffer;

void Reader()
{
    while(true)
    {
        int value;
        buffer.pop(value); // blocks when empty
        printf("%d\n", value);
    }
}

void Writer()
{
    int index = 0;

    buffer.set_capacity(5); // If buffer.size() > 5 then push will block.

    while(true)
    {
        for(int i = rand() % 5; i >= 0; i--)
        {
            buffer.push(index++); // blocks when full
            boost::this_thread::sleep(boost::posix_time::milliseconds(rand() % 10));
        }

        // "definetely wait while written portion will be read."
        // Not sure what exactly the purpose of this was. But I guess set_capacity will fulfill the same role.
    }
}

int main()
{
    srand(time(NULL));

    boost::thread readerThread(Reader);
    boost::thread writerThread(Writer);

    getchar();

    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
TBB is interesting. Did not even heard about it. Thank you. –  Slav Feb 19 '11 at 22:14
    
Example was design to test the database communication where queries are sent one-by-one while other quieries can be added into the queue at any moment, so it's need to suspend communication thread when there are no queries and resume it when some query is added. –  Slav Feb 19 '11 at 22:17
    
The link didn't take me directly to the code. I would expect pop() to return a status value, and to have a timed_wait option. You could either get data, time out or get broadcast, in the last case you can check something to see if you need to stop looping, although you could check that every time. You can assume the flag you check is bounded by the same mutex as the collection. I also used to have a push_multi() and a flush() that allowed you to push multiple items into the queue and remove all the items currently there in one go. –  CashCow Feb 20 '11 at 3:52
    
I guess that would be nice to have features. However, I have never felt I have missed any of that. –  ronag Feb 20 '11 at 9:24

Your problem might have something to do with this reading loop:

    for(int i = 0; i < buffer.size(); i++)
    {
        printf("%d\n", buffer.front());
        buffer.pop_front();
    }

The problem is that the above will only read half the elements. Because as your are popping elements, the buffer.size() is decreasing, so the iterations are going to end when the size is half of what it was when it started. You should just replace it by a while loop:

    while(buffer.size() > 0)
    {
        printf("%d\n", buffer.front());
        buffer.pop_front();
    }

Basically, what was happening is that for a while it gets lucky and kinda works (in parts due to spurious wake-ups of the condition variables), but eventually, the reader thread just never really clears the buffer and the writer thread never wakes up. At least, I think that is the problem... multi-threading issues are never trivial to see at first glance.

share|improve this answer
    
Oh, thanks for for(int i = 0; i < buffer.size(); i++) - I was in hurry preparing making up this example. But, anyway, even in such case deadlock still happen if to create boost::mutex::scoped_lock with local mutexes. –  Slav Feb 19 '11 at 21:55

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