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So right now I have this code that generates random letters in set increments determined by user input.

#include <iostream>
#include <string>
#include <cstdlib>

using namespace std;

int sLength = 0;
static const char alphanum[] =
"0123456789"
"!@#$%^&*"
"ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ"
"abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz";

int stringLength = sizeof(alphanum) - 1;

char genRandom()
{
    return alphanum[rand() % stringLength];
}

int main()
{
    cout << "What is the length of the string you wish to match?" << endl;
    cin >> sLength;
    while(true)
    {
        for (int x = 0; x < sLength; x++)
        {
            cout << genRandom();
        }
        cout << endl;
    }

}

I'm looking for a way to store the first (user defined amount) of chars into a string that I can use to compare against another string. Any help would be much appreciated.

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3 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Just add

string s(sLength, ' ');

before while (true), change

cout << genRandom();

to

s[x] = genRandom();

in your loop, and remove the cout << endl; statement. That will replace all of the printing by putting the characters into s.

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This works except for the string s(sLength); It pops out an error. It is invalid conversion from int to const char. –  Cistoran Feb 20 '11 at 2:57
    
@Cistoran: I was assuming it worked like vector (which can be constructed that way). I'll fix it. –  Jeremiah Willcock Feb 20 '11 at 3:03
    
Better to do s.reserve(sLength) - then you don't have to write each position twice. –  kotlinski Feb 20 '11 at 3:06
    
@kotlinski: I am writing the elements using [] rather than push_back, so I would need resize rather than reserve; I think resize would write to all of the elements as well. –  Jeremiah Willcock Feb 20 '11 at 3:07
    
You're right, I'm too tired. –  kotlinski Feb 20 '11 at 3:12
show 1 more comment

Well, how about this?

    std::string s;
    for (int x = 0; x < sLength; x++)
    {
        s.push_back(genRandom());
    }
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#include<algorithm>
#include<string>
// ...

int main()
{
    srand(time(0));  // forget me not
    while(true) {
        cout << "What is the length of the string you wish to match?" << endl;
        cin >> sLength;
        string r(sLength, ' ');
        generate(r.begin(), r.end(), genRandom);
        cout << r << endl;
    }

}
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