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In a SELECT statement, I have a varchar column with ORDER BY DESC on it. Examples of data in this column:

1234
987
12-a
13-bh

MySQL would return the select something like the following:

987
12-a
1234
13-bh

It puts three character long results before four character long results and so on. I would like it to ignore length and just sort the numbers that come before the '-' char. Is there something that I can ORDER on like SUBSTRING in an IF() which would remove all data in a row starting with the '-' char, so that I can CAST as an integer?

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... ORDER BY CAST(SUBSTR(yourfield, 0, LOCATE('-', yourfield)) AS INTEGER) would be a good starting point. It'll fail if there's no '-' in the field, since you'd be doing a 0-length substring. –  Marc B Feb 20 '11 at 3:38
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3 Answers

up vote 9 down vote accepted

The easiest thing to do is this

SELECT *
FROM TBL
ORDER BY VARCHAR_COLUMN * 1;

To see what is happening, just add the column I used for ordering

SELECT *, VARCHAR_COLUMN * 1
FROM TBL
ORDER BY VARCHAR_COLUMN * 1;
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This is much more elegant than what I just came up with, which also works: ORDER BY IF(LOCATE('-', columnName) != 0, CAST(SUBSTRING(columnName, 1,LOCATE('-', columnName) - 1) AS DECIMAL), CAST(columnName AS DECIMAL)) DESC –  SeanFromIT Feb 20 '11 at 4:16
    
+1 I love solutions like this! (Assuming it works consistently.) –  Mark Eirich Feb 20 '11 at 4:27
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The trick part is dealing about the "-": since its optional, you cant directly use SUBSTR in that field (as Marc B pointed out) to get rid of everything after it

So, the trick would be: append an "-" to the value!

Like this:

ORDER BY CAST(SUBSTR(CONCAT(yourfield,'-'), 0, LOCATE('-', CONCAT(yourfield,'-'))) AS UNSIGNED)

Another useful approach is to, instead of using SUBSTR to "remove" everything after the "-", replace it (and all letters) to "0", and THEN use CAST.

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Nevermind about my suggestion on the REPLACE approach: since MySQL has no support for regular expressions on replaces (only for searching), its not a good approach. Go with my proposed "CONCAT -> SUBSTR -> CAST AS NUMERIC" solution. –  MestreLion Feb 20 '11 at 3:56
    
you cannot cast to integer. It must be CAST to UNSIGNED. See my answer anyway –  RichardTheKiwi Feb 20 '11 at 4:01
    
Youre right.. in MySQL is UNSIGNED, not INTEGER. I always mess with Oracle/MS SQL/MySQL datatypes. In MySQL, INTEGER is not a "true" datatype, its just an alias, hence you cant "CAST" it. But anyway... your solution is sleek!!! Does it work? I have no idea what MySQL do with this "implicit cast" –  MestreLion Feb 20 '11 at 4:07
    
@richard : +1 for your answer... cant be easier and sleeker than that! Good call! –  MestreLion Feb 20 '11 at 4:11
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...
....
CAST(COL as SIGNED)  DESC
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