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I am trying to input 1000's of rows on SQLite3 with insert however the time it takes to insert is way too long. I've heard speed is greatly increased if the inserts are combined into one transactions. However, i cannot seem to get SQlite3 to skip checking that the file is written on the hard disk.

this is a sample:

if repeat != 'y':
    c.execute('INSERT INTO Hand (number, word) VALUES (null, ?)', [wordin[wordnum]])
    print wordin[wordnum]

data.commit()

This is what i have at the begining.

data = connect('databasenew')
data.isolation_level = None
c = data.cursor()  
c.execute('begin')

However, it does not seem to make a difference. A way to increase the insert speed would be much appreciated.

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@Amber, @Eric begin transaction should be ended with end statement, see my comment please. –  SIFE Jan 5 '12 at 15:33

3 Answers 3

According to Sqlite documentation, BEGIN transaction should be ended with COMMIT

Transactions can be started manually using the BEGIN command. Such transactions usually persist until the next COMMIT or ROLLBACK command. But a transaction will also ROLLBACK if the database is closed or if an error occurs and the ROLLBACK conflict resolution algorithm is specified. See the documentation on the ON CONFLICT clause for additional information about the ROLLBACK conflict resolution algorithm.

So, your code should be like this:

data = connect('databasenew')
data.isolation_level = None
c = data.cursor()  
c.execute('begin')

if repeat != 'y':
    c.execute('INSERT INTO Hand (number, word) VALUES (null,?)', [wordin[wordnum]])
    print wordin[wordnum]

    data.commit()

    c.execute('commit')
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1  
your indentation appears to be messed up –  wrongusername Oct 7 '12 at 1:06
1  
agreed , it would be good if somebody could correct this - difficult to understand why there is apparently two commits in there ? –  monojohnny Feb 7 '13 at 18:01
    
@monojohnny Thank you for the note. –  SIFE Feb 7 '13 at 22:07
    
Why two commits? I got OperationalError: cannot commit - no transaction is active –  rofrol Jan 17 '14 at 12:37

http://stackoverflow.com/a/3689929/1147726 answers the question. execute('begin') does not have any effect. Apparently, a connection.commit() is sufficient.

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You can use executemany, see this SO question: python sqlite question - Insert method

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