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I got an error while compiling C++ :

/tmp/ccqs6UN2.o: In function `main': PowerModulus.cpp:(.text+0x194): undefined reference to `takeModulusLOOP(int, int, int)' collect2: ld returned 1 exit status

The source code :

#include "PowerModulus.h"
#include <iostream>
int modint(int x, int moduint);
int takeModulusLOOP(int x, int n, int moduint);

int main(){
    std::cout << takeModulusLOOP(5348,700,335);
}

int PowerModulus::takeModulusLOOP(int x, int n, int moduint){
    int total = modint(x, moduint) ;
    n--;
    while (--n){
        total = modint( total * x, moduint );
    }
    return total;
}

int PowerModulus::modint(int x, int moduint){
    while ( x < 0) // deal with negative
        x += moduint;
    return x % moduint;//comes out positive now -> %
}

PowerModulus::PowerModulus() {
    // TODO Auto-generated constructor stub

}

PowerModulus::~PowerModulus() {
    // TODO Auto-generated destructor stub
}

Header file :

#ifndef POWERMODULUS_H_
#define POWERMODULUS_H_
int modint(int x, int moduint);
int takeModulusLOOP(int x, int n, int moduint);

class PowerModulus {
public:
    int takeModulusLOOP(int x, int n, int moduint);
    int modint(int x, int moduint);
    PowerModulus();
    virtual ~PowerModulus();
};

#endif /* POWERMODULUS_H_ */

Can anyone tell me where is the error ?

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4 Answers 4

You have declared a global takeModulusLOOP function, then call it in main, without ever defining it. This is a different function than PowerModulus::takeModulusLOOP.

// main.cpp
#include "PowerModulus.h"
#include <iostream>

int main(){
    std::cout << PowerModulus::takeModulusLOOP(5348,700,335) << '\n';
    return 0;
}

Changed to a namespace instead of a class, and separated into header and implementation (instead of grouping in main.cpp):

// PowerModulus.cpp
#include "PowerModulus.h"

namespace PowerModulus {

int takeModulusLOOP(int x, int n, int moduint){
    int total = modint(x, moduint) ;
    n--;
    while (--n){
        total = modint( total * x, moduint );
    }
    return total;
}

int modint(int x, int moduint){
    while ( x < 0) // deal with negative
        x += moduint;
    return x % moduint;//comes out positive now -> %
}

}

Header:

// PowerModulus.h
#ifndef POWERMODULUS_H_
#define POWERMODULUS_H_

namespace PowerModulus {

int modint(int x, int moduint);
int takeModulusLOOP(int x, int n, int moduint);

}

#endif
share|improve this answer

This line:

std::cout << takeModulusLOOP(5348,700,335);

is calling the non-class takeModulusLOOP, which you haven't defined anywhere.

You should either call the class version, by providing an object of the class type and using something like:

PowerModulus p;
std::cout << p.takeModulusLOOP(5348,700,335);

(most likely) or providing a non-class version (least likely).

You could also consider making the function static since it doesn't seem to require an object at all. Then you don't need to instantiate one.

share|improve this answer
    
I don't know why in this situation I do not need to define : –  silentbang Feb 22 '11 at 2:17
    
#include "ex1.h" #include <iostream> void print(); int main(){ print(); return 0; } void print(){ std::cout << "Hello" << std::endl; } ex1::ex1() { // TODO Auto-generated constructor stub } ex1::~ex1() { // TODO Auto-generated destructor stub } –  silentbang Feb 22 '11 at 2:18
    
#ifndef EX1_H_ #define EX1_H_ void print(); class ex1 { public: void print(); ex1(); virtual ~ex1(); }; #endif /* EX1_H_ */ –  silentbang Feb 22 '11 at 2:19
    
@silentbang, in those last three comments, you have a global print (straight after main and nothing to do with the ex1 class). Not so in your original code in the question, where takeModulosLOOP does belong to the class. –  paxdiablo Feb 22 '11 at 2:28

You receive the error because you do not have such a function. Actually you have it in PowerModulus class, so you should call the function from PowerModulus instance.

PowerModulus pM;
pM.takeModulusLoop(5348,700,335);

you do not need to claim the function in the beginning of your .h file or in the beginning of your .cpp file

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I don't know why, in this case ommiting claiming prototype in the beginning of .cpp and .h is ok, but all the time it does not –  silentbang Feb 20 '11 at 11:08

If you intended to use the takeModulusLoop function of the PowerModulus class then you need not declare a global function again.. But, if you intended to use a different global function , then you need to define it in its context..

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