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I am trying to generate random numbers to be printed on the console. I am programming in C on Linux. I wanted to print all the numbers at a single place after a time interval of a second for each number. I am using sleep() for stopping a 'time interval'.I tried \b,\r and all but none works. I just wanted this to run,

 for(i=0;i<10;i++)
 {
   printf("%d",i);
   sleep(1);
   printf("\b");
 }

I am desperate, please help!

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3  
What do you mean by "none works"? – wj32 Feb 20 '11 at 9:46
1  
Welcome to Stack Overflow. Please spend some time learning about the etiquette here. Please read the FAQ carefully and then go back to your previous questions. Please accept the answer the most addresses your problem and vote up other answers that are helpful and informative. – David Heffernan Feb 20 '11 at 10:01
    
I didn't know the \b escape didn't work on Linux terminal consoles. Is it true? – xanatos Feb 20 '11 at 10:30
    
I would use \r here, and if that doesn't work then your terminal settings are confused. – Enno Feb 20 '11 at 10:33
    
Definitely not ANSI C... – Conrad Meyer Feb 20 '11 at 12:50
up vote 6 down vote accepted

stdout is probably buffered, so flush it.

for(i=0;i<10;i++)
 {
   printf("%d",i);
   fflush(stdout);
   sleep(1);
   printf("\b");
 }
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Yup. And this is instructive, so the OP should understand why this is important. But use curses. Really. – dmckee Feb 20 '11 at 17:48
1  
This is the right answer. Don't use curses unless you want a fullscreen program. Curses is not usable for simple progress bars and the like in programs that want their main output to be part of the main terminal scroll. – R.. Feb 20 '11 at 22:31
    
this helped a lot and it works the way i wanted. But how does the stdout gets buffered every time i run the program? – Jehoshuah Feb 21 '11 at 7:37

The easiest answer is probably to use ncurses:

#include <ncurses.h>

int main()
{   
    int i;

    initscr(); /* Start curses mode */

    for (i=0;i<10;i++) {
            mvprintw(0,0, "%d", i); /* coords 0,0 */
            refresh(); /* Update screen */
            sleep(1);
    }

    getch(); /* Wait for user input */
    endwin(); /* End curses mode */

    return 0;
}

Compile with gcc -o counter counter.c -lncurses.

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