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i need to sort a std::map using its value rather than its key. is there a easy way to do it.

i got one solution in the follwing thread:
std::map sort by data?
is there any better solution.

map<long, double> testMap;
// some code to generate the values in the map.

sort(testMap.begin(), testMap.end());  // is there any function like this to sort the map?

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3  
Why on Earth is the C tag on this question? –  GManNickG Feb 20 '11 at 11:14
1  
Why do you need the map sorted that way? Are you trying to improve lookup time, or do you want to traverse it a certain way? –  Matt Curtis Feb 20 '11 at 11:18
    
You can switch key with value. –  Pawel Zubrycki Feb 20 '11 at 13:17
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10 Answers

up vote 13 down vote accepted

Even though correct answers have already been posted, I thought I'd add a demo of how you can do this cleanly:

template<typename A, typename B>
std::pair<B,A> flip_pair(const std::pair<A,B> &p)
{
    return std::pair<B,A>(p.second, p.first);
}

template<typename A, typename B>
std::map<B,A> flip_map(const std::map<A,B> &src)
{
    std::map<B,A> dst;
    std::transform(src.begin(), src.end(), std::inserter(dst, dst.begin()), 
                   flip_pair<A,B>);
    return dst;
}

int main(void)
{
    std::map<int, double> src;

    ...    

    std::map<double, int> dst = flip_map(src);
    // dst is now sorted by what used to be the value in src!
}
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thanks for the sample code. it helped me to generalize the solution. now i can filp any map easily. –  user619237 Feb 21 '11 at 20:00
8  
+1 for the clean solution. However, it would be better if the destination map was a multimap, in order to avoid collisions with same "value" keys. –  theosem Apr 10 '13 at 12:27
2  
If multiple values have the same value, this solution does not work, as the reversed map can't have two pairs with the same key. For unique value in the original map, this solution works! –  Jim Huang Nov 5 '13 at 6:58
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If you want to present the values in a map in sorted order, then copy the values from the map to vector and sort the vector.

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1  
+1: This (or variants thereof, such as creating an "inverse" map) is the right answer. –  Oli Charlesworth Feb 20 '11 at 11:25
3  
if i do this. then i loose the relation between the key and values. say, i have map<long, double> id2Score. it contains all the id (where id is not 0..n, it may be like 1, 5, 13 etc) and score. then if i create a vector with score and sort then i will loose the information which id is associated with which score. –  user619237 Feb 21 '11 at 19:58
    
@ user619237: not really. You can sort the vector. Get the max or min or whatever value that you require. Then interate through the original map and look for a match to that value in the values of the map("it->second" .) –  hAcKnRoCk Sep 6 '13 at 7:32
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I like the the answer from Oli (flipping a map), but seems it has a problem: the container map does not allow two elements with the same key.

A solution is to make dst the type multimap. Another one is to dump src into a vector and sort the vector. The former requires minor modifications to Oli's answer, and the latter can be implemented using STL copy concisely

#include <iostream>
#include <utility>
#include <map>
#include <vector>
#include <algorithm>

using namespace std;

int main() {
  map<int, int> m;
  m[11] = 1;
  m[22] = 2;
  m[33] = 3;

  vector<pair<int, int> > v;
  copy(m.begin(),
       m.end(),
       back_inserter<vector<pair<int, int> > >(v));

  for (size_t i = 0; i < v.size(); ++i) {
    cout << v[i].first << " , " << v[i].second << "\n";
  }

  return 0;
};
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I needed something similar, but the flipped map wouldn't work for me. I just copied out my map (freq below) into a vector of pairs, then sorted the pairs however I wanted.

std::vector<pair<int, int>> pairs;
for (auto itr = freq.begin(); itr != freq.end(); ++itr)
    pairs.push_back(*itr);

sort(pairs.begin(), pairs.end(), [=](pair<int, int>& a, pair<int, int>& b)
{
    return a.second < b.second;
}
);
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You can't sort a std::map this way, because a the entries in the map are sorted by the key. If you want to sort by value, you need to create a new std::map with swapped key and value.

map<long, double> testMap;
map<double, long> testMap2;

// Insert values from testMap to testMap2
// The values in testMap2 are sorted by the double value

Remember that the double keys need to be unique in testMap2 or use std::multimap.

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thanks. but i know this solution. is there any other solution except this? –  user619237 Feb 20 '11 at 11:35
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A std::map sorted by it's value is in essence a std::set. By far the easiest way is to copy all entries in the map to a set (taken and adapted from here)

template <typename M, typename S> 
void MapToSet( const  M & m, S & s )
{
    typename M::const_iterator end = m.end();
    for( typename M::const_iterator it = m.begin(); it != end ; ++it )
    {
        s.insert( it->second );
    }
}

One caveat: if the map contains different keys with the same value, they will not be inserted into the set and be lost.

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Flipped structure might no longer be a map but rather a multimap, thus in the flip_map example above not all elements from B will necessarily appear in the resulting data structure.

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U can consider using boost::bimap that might gave you a feeling that map is sorted by key and by values simultaneously (this is not what really happens, though)

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In the following sample code, I wrote an simple way to output top words in an word_map map where key is string (word) and value is unsigned int (word occurrence).

The idea is simple, find the current top word and delete it from the map. It's not optimized, but it works well when the map is not large and we only need to output the top N words, instead of sorting the whole map.

const int NUMBER_OF_TOP_WORDS = 300;
for (int i = 1; i <= NUMBER_OF_TOP_WORDS; i++) {
  if (word_map.empty())
    break;
  // Go through the map and find the max item.
  int max_value = 0;
  string max_word = "";
  for (const auto& kv : word_map) {
    if (kv.second > max_value) {
      max_value = kv.second;
      max_word = kv.first;
    }
  }
  // Erase this entry and print.
  word_map.erase(max_word);
  cout << "Top:" << i << " Count:" << max_value << " Word:<" << max_word << ">" <<     endl;
}
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To build on Oli's solution (http://stackoverflow.com/a/5056797/2472351) using multimaps, you can replace the two template functions he used with the following:

template <typename A, typename B>
multimap<B, A> flip_map(map<A,B> & src) {

    multimap<B,A> dst;

    for(map<A, B>::const_iterator it = src.begin(); it != src.end(); ++it)
        dst.insert(pair<B, A>(it -> second, it -> first));

    return dst;
}

Here is an example program that shows all the key-value pairs being preserved after performing the flip.

#include <iostream>
#include <map>
#include <string>
#include <algorithm>

using namespace std;

template <typename A, typename B>
multimap<B, A> flip_map(map<A,B> & src) {

    multimap<B,A> dst;

    for(map<A, B>::const_iterator it = src.begin(); it != src.end(); ++it)
        dst.insert(pair<B, A>(it -> second, it -> first));

    return dst;
}

int main() {

    map<string, int> test;
    test["word"] = 1;
    test["spark"] = 15;
    test["the"] = 2;
    test["mail"] = 3;
    test["info"] = 3;
    test["sandwich"] = 15;

    cout << "Contents of original map:\n" << endl;
    for(map<string, int>::const_iterator it = test.begin(); it != test.end(); ++it)
        cout << it -> first << " " << it -> second << endl; 

    multimap<int, string> reverseTest = flip_map(test);

    cout << "\nContents of flipped map in descending order:\n" << endl;
    for(multimap<int, string>::const_reverse_iterator it = reverseTest.rbegin(); it != reverseTest.rend(); ++it)
        cout << it -> first << " " << it -> second << endl; 

    cout << endl;
}

Result:

enter image description here

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