Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

What's exactly wrong about the following hypothetical Haskell code? When I compile it in my brain, it should output "1".

foo :: forall a. forall b. forall c. (a -> b) -> c -> Integer -> b
foo f x n = if n > 0 then f True else f x

bar :: forall a. a -> Integer
bar x = 1

main = do
     putStrLn (show (foo bar 1 2))

GHC complains:

$ ghc -XRankNTypes -XScopedTypeVariables poly.hs 

poly.hs:2:28:
     Couldn't match expected type `a' against inferred type `Bool'
       `a' is a rigid type variable bound by
           the type signature for `foo' at poly.hs:1:14
     In the first argument of `f', namely `True'
     In the expression: f True
     In the expression: if n > 0 then f True else f x

poly.hs:2:40:
     Couldn't match expected type `Bool' against inferred type `c'
       `c' is a rigid type variable bound by
            the type signature for `foo' at poly.hs:1:34
     In the first argument of `f', namely `x'
     In the expression: f x
     In the expression: if n > 0 then f True else f x

What does that mean? Isn't it valid Rank-N polymorphism? (Disclaimer: I'm absolutely not a Haskell programmer, but OCaml doesn't support such explicit type signatures.)

share|improve this question
4  
ah the brain. my favourite compiler of all :) –  Richard H Feb 20 '11 at 11:34

1 Answer 1

up vote 14 down vote accepted

You're not actually using rank-N polymorphism in your code.

foo :: forall a. forall b. forall c. (a -> b) -> c -> Integer -> b

This is an ordinary rank-1 type. It reads: forall a,b and c this function can take a function of type a -> b, a value of type c and an Integer and return a value of type b. So it says that it can take a function of type Bool -> Integer or a function of type Integer -> Integer. It does not say that the function has to be polymorphic in its argument. To say that, you need to use:

foo :: forall b. forall c. (forall a. a -> b) -> c -> Integer -> b

Now you're saying that the type of the function needs to be forall a. a -> b, where b is fixed, but a is a newly introduced variable, so the function needs to be polymorphic in its argument.

share|improve this answer
3  
Are there any interesting occupants of the type forall a. a -> b? The only one that springs to mind is a function which takes an argument but doesn't use it at all: f x = 12 for example, like his function bar above. –  chrisdb Feb 20 '11 at 12:02
1  
@chrisdb: ... which happens to be the result of const 12. And const has found a few applications. –  delnan Feb 20 '11 at 12:12
    
@delnan: ...I can see it might be useful in a few circumstances (just like id is useful). But it doesn't seem particularly interesting, in the same way that id isn't interesting even though it is useful sometimes. –  chrisdb Feb 20 '11 at 12:19
2  
I guess S and K are very important in the implementation of Haskell, so I probably shouldn't insult const even if it seems pretty boring... –  chrisdb Feb 20 '11 at 12:23

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.