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According documentation:

System.Array.Sort<T> - sorts the elements in an entire System.Array using the System.IComparable generic interface implementation of each element of the System.Array.

Today I discover, that this code is compiling without any errors and warnings:

A []arr = new A[10];//A is not inheriting from IComparable !!

//initializing elements of arr
...

System.Array.Sort<A>(arr);

After execution I'm getting run-time error.

So why this code is compiling? I'm not big expert of C#, but I know, that C# generics supporting constraining syntax. Why constraints aren't used for Array.Sort?

share|improve this question
up vote 2 down vote accepted

In compiles because there's no constraint on T that it has to implement IComparable<T>.

I think the documentation is slightly confusing, because the array elements don't actually have to implement IComparable<T> for the same T as the call. For example, this works fine:

using System;

class Test
{
    static void Main()
    {
        object[] objects = { "d", "b", "c", "a" };        
        Array.Sort<object>(objects);
    }
}

I think it's more sensible to just say that the elements have to be comparable with each other "somehow". For example, this is fine, even though nothing's implementing the generic IComparable interface:

using System;

class A : IComparable
{
    private readonly int value;

    public A(int value)
    {
        this.value = value;
    }

    public int CompareTo(object other)
    {
        // Just cast for now...
        return value.CompareTo(((A)other).value);
    }
}

class Test
{
    static void Main()
    {
        object[] objects = { new A(5), new A(3), new A(4) };
        Array.Sort<object>(objects);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
So purpose of not using constraint on types is to be able to sort objects, that implement IComparable but don't implement IComparable<T>? – UmmaGumma Feb 20 '11 at 14:40
    
@Ashot: As far as I can tell, yes. – Jon Skeet Feb 20 '11 at 15:43

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