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Hi im a student and new to compiler design concepts.I dont know how to develop a lexer and parser in java? Please help me to do this giv me a guide lines...

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closed as not a real question by Bill the Lizard Dec 29 '12 at 16:13

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4 Answers 4

Do you know about JavaCC?

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If you want to learn to write a compiler, you should also study the fundamentals of how compilers work. MIT OpenCourseWare1 has a good class on the subject, with links to good textbooks.

For links to actual lexer / parser tools, you can look at the other answers, or use Google. I think the course may also mention which tools it used.

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You can use ANTLR to defined the grammar and it can generate the compilers and you can also construct interpreters.

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No, ANTLR does not generate interpreters. –  Bart Kiers Feb 20 '11 at 18:06
    
@Bart Kiers - corrected my post –  Pangea Feb 20 '11 at 18:11
    
Thanks. But your answer is still below par, IMHO. Although ANTLR (and tools like it) are sometimes called "compiler compilers", saying that ANTLR generates a compiler, is (again IMHO) misleading. ANTLR generates, given a grammar, a lexer and/or parser. And your remark that "you can also construct interpreters", is self-evident: of course someone can create an interpreter... Sorry to bust your balls, but the answer isn't worth much, as is. –  Bart Kiers Feb 20 '11 at 18:44

You might be interested in the Interpreter Pattern on Wikipedia, it also provides a parser for completeness.

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