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Example:

Class *_obj1;
Class *_obj2;

void doThis(Class *obj) {}

void create() {
    Class *obj1 = new Class();
    Class obj2;

    doThis(obj1);
    doThis(&obj2);

    _obj1 = obj1;
    _obj2 = &obj2;
}

int main (int argc, const char * argv[]) {

    create();

    _obj1->doSomething();
    _obj2->doSomething();

    return 0;
}

This creates 2 objects, creates pointers to them, then main() calls a method on each. The Class object creates a char* and stores the C string "Hello!" in it; the ~Class() deallocator frees the memory. The doSomething() method prints out "buff: %s" using printf(). Simple enough. Now if we run it we get this:

Dealloc
Buff: Hello!
Buff: ¯ø_ˇ

Obviously the stack object does not work here - it's obvious that when the function exits the pointer _obj2 is pointing at a location in the stack. This is why I used heap objects in my previous question, which people told me was "stupid".

So, the first question is: if how can I convert the stack object (obj2) to a heap object so it's not deallocated after create() exits? I want a straight answer, not an arrogant "you're doing it wrong" as so many have done. Because in this case stack objects cannot work so heap objects seem to be the only way. EDIT: Also, converting back to a stack object would be useful as well.

The second question: the specific example of heap objects being "wrong" was creating a new vector<string>* using the new operator. If dynamically allocating STL objects is wrong, then what's the right way? Obviously if you create them as stack objects it fails because they're immediately deallocated, but I've been told (again, by a very high-ranking member) that dynamically allocating them can corrupt the heap. So what's the right way to do it?

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marked as duplicate by Konrad Rudolph, Jim Lewis, Andrey, Hans Passant, Loki Astari Feb 20 '11 at 18:17

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

3  
Your other question was closed because it was filled with pointless ranting. If you want to get a real question going, edit your old question to be on topic and acceptable, not ask a new question. In case this is a real question and not just a flame bait, “get a good C++ book” is the qualitatively best answer you can hope for. This is a complex subject, and an answer on this platform cannot do it justice. –  Konrad Rudolph Feb 20 '11 at 18:00
2  
If you want help. Stop being rude and ask the question nicely. –  Loki Astari Feb 20 '11 at 18:01
2  
if people tell you "you obviously need to read a C++ book" may be there is a point in it? –  Andrey Feb 20 '11 at 18:03
1  
There is no contradiction between the two statements. The code in question didn’t cause a heap corruption (and nobody said that) but using heap allocation spuriously will drastically increase the risk of an error that will in turn cause heap corruption. Apart from that, sbi’s use of the word “stupid” was … well, stupid, since lack of knowledge isn’t the same as stupidity. In his defense, you seriously flame baited them so why are you surprised when someone took the bait? –  Konrad Rudolph Feb 20 '11 at 18:28
1  
@Konrad: To be fair, I had used the word "stupid" exactly once, in a comment, when paraphrasing and summarizing what I and others had said. In my original answer I said that this "is almost certainly wrong". –  sbi Feb 20 '11 at 19:22

7 Answers 7

up vote 4 down vote accepted

So, the first question is: if how can I convert the stack object (obj2) to a heap object so it's not deallocated after create() exits? I want a straight answer,

The straight answer is: You can't "convert" an object between the stack and heap. You can create a copy of the object that lives in the other space, as others have pointed out, but that's it.

The second question: the specific example of heap objects being "wrong" was creating a new vector* using the new operator. If dynamically allocating STL objects is wrong, then what's the right way? Obviously if you create them as stack objects it fails because they're immediately deallocated, but I've been told (again, by a very high-ranking member) that dynamically allocating them can corrupt the heap.

Dynamically allocating STL objects will not on its own corrupt the heap. (No idea where you might have heard that.)

If you want to use a stack-allocated STL object outside of the function that you created it in, you can't, since the stack space in which the object resides is only valid inside the function that created it.

You can, however, return a copy of the object:

std::vector<char> SomeFunc()
{
    std::vector<char> myvector;
    // myvector.operations ...
    return myvector;
}

As I said, though, this will return a copy of the object, not the original object itself -- that would be impossible, since the stack that contains the object is unwound after the function returns.

One other option is to have the caller pass in a reference / pointer to the object that your function manipulates, if this makes sense for your particular scenario:

void SomeFunc(std::vector<char>& destination)
{
    // destination.operations ...
}

void AnotherFunc()
{
    std::vector<char> myvector;
    SomeFunc(myvector);
}

As you can see, you've still allocated everything on the stack, and you avoid the (sometimes consequential) overhead of relying on the copy-constructor to return a copy of the object.

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2  
Returning copies of an object is a lot cheaper than this answer makes it sound because the compiler can almost always elide the copy. –  Konrad Rudolph Feb 20 '11 at 18:33
    
Thank you for finally answering the actual question. I do know about stack/heap objects (which is why I used the example to illustrate why stack objects wouldn't work) but I couldn't find an easy way to convert between them efficiently (without the copy constructor) and use a heap object where a stack object was expected (i.e. using &variable returns a pointer to a stack object within the scope of the function, but I've never been able to get it to work the other way around, like when a function expects a Class& and you want to give it a heap object). If there's a way I'd be glad to hear it... –  Justin Mrkva Feb 20 '11 at 18:40
    
If a function expects a Class & and you have a Class * ptr got from the heap, you can simply dereference the pointer and pass it to the function (e.g. func(*ptr)), there's nothing wrong with it. By the way, in general if the function gets a reference the object lifetime management remains on the caller side. –  Matteo Italia Feb 20 '11 at 18:47
    
Konrad, are you saying that the compiler won't actually copy it but will shift the actual data in the stack? It still leaves the issues of lots of objects on a deep stack being more likely to cause an overflow, but on the other hand does make a bit more sense in terms of returning copies of objects (I've used memcpy() extensively in some code that processes large amounts of data and I know how fast it can be). I still need the heap objects for my purposes but I'll keep that in mind in the future. –  Justin Mrkva Feb 20 '11 at 18:50
    
Matteo, I've tried that and believe it or not with certain systems it does not work. For example, with void doThis(Class& obj) {}, if I have Class *obj1 = new Class(); and then do doThis(*obj1);, it works on some systems but not others (i.e. some specific Solaris machines we were dealing with, as well as a few variants of Linux). I'm not sure if it was simply the version of GCC or if that specific usage is an implementation-dependent feature but I've learned not to rely on it because it doesn't work on some of the systems I deal with. –  Justin Mrkva Feb 20 '11 at 18:54

So, the first question is: if how can I convert the stack object (obj2) to a heap object so it's not deallocated after create() exits?

This line:

_obj2 = &obj2;

Change to:

_obj2 = new Class(obj2);  // Create an object on the heap invoking the copy constructor.

I want a straight answer, not an arrogant "you're doing it wrong" as so many have done.

Thats as straight an answer as you can get. Obviously you are new to C++, So I am sure this will nto work as intended because you have probably made a couple of mistakes in the defintion of the class "Class" (by the way terrible name).

Also, converting back to a stack object would be useful as well.

class obj3(*_obj2);  // dereference the heap object pass it to the copy constructor.

The second question: the specific example of heap objects being "wrong" was creating a new vector<string>* using the new operator. If dynamically allocating STL objects is wrong, then what's the right way?

Why do you dynamically allocate the vector. Just create it locally.

std::vector<std::string> funct()
{
    std::vector<std::string>   vecString;
    // fill your vector here.

    return vecString;  // Notice no dynamic allocation with new,
}

Using new/delete is using C++ like C. What you need to read up on is smart pointers. These are obejcts that control the lifespan of the object and automatically delete the object when they go out of scope.

std::auto_ptr<Class>   x(new Class);

Here x is a smart pointer (of type auto_ptr) when it goes out of scope the object will be deleted. But you can return an auto_ptr to the calling function and it will be safely transfered out of the function. Its actually a lot more complicated than that and you need a book.

Obviously if you create them as stack objects it fails because they're immediately deallocated,

Its de'allocated when it goes out of scope.

but I've been told (again, by a very high-ranking member) that dynamically allocating them can corrupt the heap.

If you do it incorrectly. Which given your knowledge is very likely. But hard to verify since you have not provided the definition of Class.

So what's the right way to do it?

  1. Learn why you should use stack objects
  2. Learn what smart pointers are.
  3. Learn how to use smart pointers to control lifespans of objects.
  4. Learn the different types of smart pointers.
  5. Look up what the separation of concerns is (you are not following this basic principle).
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You have to either copy-construct a new heap object (Class * foo = new Class(obj2)) or assign the stack object to a heap object (*obj1 = obj2).

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1  
Yes, although I would recommend the copy-constructor method over the assignment. Also, if you do the assignment method, you first have to create a new class object, so it takes two steps: _obj2 = new Class(); *_obj2 = obj2; - so you can see why I prefer the one-step copy constructor. –  Tim Feb 20 '11 at 18:10

the only way is to copy object.

Change declaration to:

Class _obj2;

and assign:

_obj2 = obj2;

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Taking the address of a stack variable won't magically transfer it into heap. You need to write a proper copy-constructor for your class and use _obj2 = new Class(obj2);.

As for STL containers, they allocate their data on the heap anyway, why would you want to allocate container itself on the heap? Put them in a scope that will keep them alive as long as you need them.

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Your stack object is created inside the create function and is deallocated as soon you get out of scope of the function. The pointer is invalid.

You could change Class* obj2 to Class obj2 and the assign (which means copy) the object by obj2 = obj2;

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The heap object remains valid until it is deallocated. Since this program never deletes it, it will remain valid until the program ends. –  Ben Voigt Feb 20 '11 at 18:02
    
@Ben: I think dwo probably meant to say "stack" instead of "heap", and I edited accordingly. –  Jim Lewis Feb 20 '11 at 18:05
    
Oh, sure I meant stack. Thx for the correction! –  dwo Feb 21 '11 at 12:43

I think you're really trying to ask "How can I return an object created inside my function?" There are several valid ways:

  • Allocate on the heap and return a pointer
  • Use an automatic variable and return its value, not a pointer (the compiler will copy it)
  • Let the caller provide storage, either by pointer or reference parameter, and build your object there.
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