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I'm searching the java library for parsing XML (complex configuration and data files), I googled a bit but couldn't found other than dom4j (Seems like they are working on V2).. I have taken look at commons configuration but didn't liked it, Other apache projects on XML seems under hibernation. I haven't evaluated dom4j by myself but just wanted to know - Do java has other (Good) open source xml parsing library? and how's your experience with dom4j?

After the @Voo's answer let me ask another one - Should I use java's in built classes or any third library like dom4j.. What are the advantages?

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Can you define good? Performance, quality of API, something else? –  Yishai Feb 20 '11 at 19:02
    
Performance and ease of use (yes, Quality of API) –  Premraj Feb 20 '11 at 19:11
1  
You've not posted any specific reasons for not using Java's native implementations. –  Hovercraft Full Of Eels Feb 20 '11 at 19:35
    
vtd-xml will be the one to beat for performance/memory usage and ease of use. –  vtd-xml-author Feb 20 '11 at 21:11
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closed as not constructive by casperOne Oct 22 '12 at 15:11

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9 Answers

up vote 67 down vote accepted

Actually Java supports 4 methods to parse XML out of the box:

DOM Parser/Builder: The whole XML structure is loaded into memory and you can use the well known DOM methods to work with it. DOM also allows you to write to the document with Xslt transformations. Example:

    DocumentBuilderFactory factory = DocumentBuilderFactory.newInstance();
    factory.setValidating(true);
    factory.setIgnoringElementContentWhitespace(true);
    try {
        DocumentBuilder builder = factory.newDocumentBuilder();
        File file = new File("test.xml");
        Document doc = builder.parse(file);
        // Do something with the document here.
    } catch (ParserConfigurationException e) {
    } catch (SAXException e) {
    } catch (IOException e) { 
    }

SAX Parser: Solely to read a XML document. The Sax parser runs through the document and calls callback methods of the user. There are methods for start/end of a document, element and so on. They're defined in org.xml.sax.ContentHandler and there's an empty helper class DefaultHandler.

    SAXParserFactory factory = SAXParserFactory.newInstance();
    factory.setValidating(true);
    try {
        SAXParser saxParser = factory.newSAXParser();
        File file = new File("test.xml");
        saxParser.parse(file, new ElementHandler());    // specify handler
    }
    catch(ParserConfigurationException e1) {
    }
    catch(SAXException e1) {
    }
    catch(IOException e) {
    }

StAx Reader/Writer: This works with a datastream oriented interface. The program asks for the next element when it's ready just like a cursor/iterator. You can also create documents with it. Read document:

    FileInputStream fis = null;
    try {
        fis = new FileInputStream("test.xml");
        XMLInputFactory xmlInFact = XMLInputFactory.newInstance();
        XMLStreamReader reader = xmlInFact.createXMLStreamReader(fis);
        while(reader.hasNext()) {
            reader.next(); // do something here
        }
    }
    catch(IOException exc) {
    }
    catch(XMLStreamException exc) {
    }

Write document:

    FileOutputStream fos = null;
    try {
        fos = new FileOutputStream("test.xml");
        XMLOutputFactory xmlOutFact = XMLOutputFactory.newInstance();
        XMLStreamWriter writer = xmlOutFact.createXMLStreamWriter(fos);
        writer.writeStartDocument();
        writer.writeStartElement("test");
        // write stuff
        writer.writeEndElement();
        writer.flush();
    }
    catch(IOException exc) {
    }
    catch(XMLStreamException exc) {
    }
    finally {
    }

JAXB: The newest implementation to read XML documents: Is part of Java 6 in v2. This allows us to serialize java objects from a document. You read the document with a class that implements a interface to javax.xml.bind.Unmarshaller (you get a class for this from JAXBContext.newInstance). The context has to be initialized with the used classes, but you just have to specify the root classes and don't have to worry about static referenced classes. You use annotations to specify which classes should be elements (@XmlRootElement) and which fields are elements(@XmlElement) or attributes (@XmlAttribute, what a surprise!)

    RootElementClass adr = new RootElementClass();
    FileInputStream adrFile = null;
    try {
        adrFile = new FileInputStream("test");
        JAXBContext ctx = JAXBContext.newInstance(RootElementClass.class);
        Unmarshaller um = ctx.createUnmarshaller();
        adr = (RootElementClass) um.unmarshal(adrFile);
    }
    catch(IOException exc) {
    }
    catch(JAXBException exc) {
    }
    finally {
    }

Write document:

    FileOutputStream adrFile = null;
    try {
        adrFile = new FileOutputStream("test.xml");
        JAXBContext ctx = JAXBContext.newInstance(RootElementClass.class);
        Marshaller ma = ctx.createMarshaller();
        ma.marshal(..);
    }
    catch(IOException exc) {
    }
    catch(JAXBException exc) {
    }
    finally {
    }

Examples shamelessly copied from some old lecture slides ;-)

Edit: About "which API shoild I use?". Well it depends - not all APIs have the same capabilities as you see, but if you have control over the classes you use to map the XML document JAXB is my personal favorite, really elegant and simple solution (though I haven't used it for really large documents, it could get a bit complex). SAX is pretty easy to use too and just stay away from DOM if you don't have a really good reason to use it - old, clunky API in my opinion. I don't think there are any modern 3rd party libraries that feature anything especially useful that's missing from the stl and the standard libraries have the usual advantages of being extremely well tested, documented and stable.

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I want to note one thing: old doesn't mean bad.
2005 is not Jurassic period and I think you shouldn't dismiss a library (in Java, at least) because it hasn't been updated for 5 years.

In fact, the last major update of Java we had approximately at the same time. And when was XML standard finalized? I bet more than 10 years ago.

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I'm not saying it is bad.. but there may be other libraries which are worth noticing :) –  Premraj Feb 20 '11 at 19:10
    
+1 - Just because a standard is 5 years old doesn't mean implementations of that standard don't continue to release new versions which are faster, more robust, and contain extensions. I would be more concerned about using a proprietary library that hasn't released so much as a patch in a couple of years. –  Blaise Doughan Feb 22 '11 at 14:25
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Nikita's point is an excellent one: don't confuse mature with bad. XML hasn't changed much.

JDOM would be another alternative to DOM4J.

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Which one will you choose and why? –  Premraj Feb 20 '11 at 19:14
1  
It doesn't really much matter. Both are wrappers of the SAX and DOM parsers built into the JDK. The W3C Document hierarchy is verbose and hard to use, so both DOM4J and JDOM try to make it easier. I like Elliott Rusty Harold, so I tend to reach for JDOM first. –  duffymo Feb 20 '11 at 19:51
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Java supports two methods for XML parsing out of the box.

SAXParser

You can use this parser if you want to parse large XML files and/or don't want to use a lot of memory.

http://download.oracle.com/javase/6/docs/api/javax/xml/parsers/SAXParserFactory.html

Example: http://www.mkyong.com/java/how-to-read-xml-file-in-java-sax-parser/

DOMParser

You can use this parser if you need to do XPath queries or need to have the complete DOM available.

http://download.oracle.com/javase/6/docs/api/javax/xml/parsers/DocumentBuilderFactory.html

Example: http://www.mkyong.com/java/how-to-read-xml-file-in-java-dom-parser/

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For folks interested in using JDOM, but afraid that hasn't been updated in a while (especially not leveraging Java generics), there is a fork called CoffeeDOM which exactly addresses these aspects and modernizes the JDOM API, read more here:

http://cdmckay.org/blog/2011/05/20/introducing-coffeedom-a-jdom-fork-for-java-5/

and download it from the project page at:

http://coffeedom.googlecode.com/

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You don't need an external library for parsing XML in Java. Java has come with built-in implementations for SAX and DOM for ages.

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Sax parser is a good one, it is simple with their event-driven API, Have a look at: http://www.asjava.com/java-xml/how-to-read-xml-file-via-sax-parser-in-java/

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Look at vtd-XML, DOM and SAX are somewhat ancient APIs that has not been updated/improved for a while.

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If you want a DOM-like API - that is, one where the XML parser turns the document into a tree of Element and Attribute nodes - then there are at least four to choose from: DOM itself, JDOM, DOM4J, and XOM. The only possible reason to use DOM is because it's perceived as a standard and is supplied in the JDK: in all other respects, the others are all superior. My own preference, for its combination of simplicity, power, and performance, is XOM.

And of course, there are other styles of processing: low-level parser interfaces (SAX and StAX), data-object binding interfaces (JAXB), and high-level declarative languages (XSLT, XQuery, XPath). Which is best for you depends on your project requirements and your personal taste.

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DOM is a W3C standard (w3.org/DOM). The Java implementation of this standard is covered by the JAXP standard (jcp.org/en/jsr/detail?id=206). JAXP is then implemented by different providers such as: Oracle, Apache, etc. –  Blaise Doughan Feb 22 '11 at 14:15
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