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I have a bash script that calls a java class method. The method returns a string to the linux console when run independently. how can I assign the value from the java method to a variable in a bash script?

running the script:

java -cp /opt/my_dir/class.method [parameter]

output: my_string

if added in a bash script:

read parameter
java -cp /opt/my_dir/class.method [parameter] | read the_output
echo $the_output

the above doesnt work, I also tried unsuccessfully:

the_output=java -cp /opt/my_dir/class.method [parameter]
the_output=`java -cp /opt/my_dir/class.method [parameter]`
java -cp /opt/my_dir/class.method [parameter] 2>&1

How can i get the output stored into the_output variable?

thanks.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

In Bash:

$ the_output="$(java -cp /opt/my_dir/class.method [parameter])"

See: http://www.gnu.org/software/bash/manual/bashref.html#Command-Substitution

EDIT:
Actually, looking at your command-line, I'm surprised that it works. I haven't seen a Java program called like that before. Usuallly you can only run a main() method from a java command. How does yours work?

EDIT:
You say that you are still getting output going to the console when you do this. You may need to capture stderr too:

  $ the_output="$(java -cp /opt/my_dir/class.method [parameter] 2>&1 )"

2> means redirect stderr (file descriptor 2). &1 means to the same place as stdout (file descriptor 1) is going.

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when I run this command i get the output "my_string" in the console but the echo $the_output returns empty. –  Rich Feb 20 '11 at 20:11
    
That will happen if your java program writes to System.err rather than System.out. In that case, you need to get Bash capture stderr as well. See my updated answer. –  Adrian Pronk Feb 20 '11 at 21:05
    
Thanks! the last one works! the_output="$(java -cp /opt/my_dir/class.method [parameter] 2>&1 )" –  Rich Feb 20 '11 at 21:20
    
You actually don't need the outer quotes here. –  Paŭlo Ebermann Feb 20 '11 at 22:07

Use command substitution by wrapping your command in backquotes.

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