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Using Joda 1.6.2 with Android

The following code hangs for about 15 seconds.

DateTime dt = new DateTime();

Originally posted this post Android Java - Joda Date is slow in Eclipse/Emulator -

Just tried it again and its still not any better. Does anyone else have this problem or know how to fix it?

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8 Answers 8

I also ran into this problem. Jon Skeet's suspicions were correct, the problem is that the time zones are being loaded really inefficiently, opening a jar file and then reading the manifest to try to get this information.

However, simply calling DateTimeZone.setProvider([custom provider instance ...]) is not sufficient because, for reasons that don't make sense to me, DateTimeZone has a static initializer where it calls getDefaultProvider().

To be completely safe, you can override this default by setting this system property before you ever call anything in the joda.

In your activity, for example, add this:

@Override
public void onCreate(Bundle savedInstanceState) {
    System.setProperty("org.joda.time.DateTimeZone.Provider", 
    "com.your.package.FastDateTimeZoneProvider");
}

Then all you have to do is define FastDateTimeZoneProvider. I wrote the following:

package com.your.package;

public class FastDateTimeZoneProvider implements Provider {
    public static final Set<String> AVAILABLE_IDS = new HashSet<String>();

    static {
        AVAILABLE_IDS.addAll(Arrays.asList(TimeZone.getAvailableIDs()));
    }

    public DateTimeZone getZone(String id) {
        if (id == null) {
            return DateTimeZone.UTC;
        }

        TimeZone tz = TimeZone.getTimeZone(id);
        if (tz == null) {
            return DateTimeZone.UTC;
        }

        int rawOffset = tz.getRawOffset();

            //sub-optimal. could be improved to only create a new Date every few minutes
        if (tz.inDaylightTime(new Date())) {
            rawOffset += tz.getDSTSavings();
        }

        return DateTimeZone.forOffsetMillis(rawOffset);
    }

    public Set getAvailableIDs() {
        return AVAILABLE_IDS;
    }
}

I've tested this and it appears to work on Android SDK 2.1+ with joda version 1.6.2. It can of course be optimized further, but while profiling my app (mogwee), this decreased the DateTimeZone initialize time from ~500ms to ~18ms.

If you are using proguard to build your app, you'll have to add this line to proguard.cfg because Joda expects the class name to be exactly as you specify:

-keep class com.your.package.FastDateTimeZoneProvider
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Thanks for code. I was working on some automation, and it turned out that on emulator with API Level 11 ActivityManager was crashing my process under test specifically because of timeout on JodaTime initialization. What's weird though, is that all other emulators (8-15 levels) were working just fine. Probably 11th is the slowest one :) –  inazaruk Dec 27 '11 at 17:36
    
@plowman great job. this also solved the issue of me not getting the correct local time at all when using joda in android. –  LuxuryMode May 17 '12 at 21:17
    
Works like a charm. Thanks –  rootpanthera Apr 25 '13 at 22:12
    
You said "sub-optimal". Is replacing new Date() with getNow() sufficient? –  BornToCode Jun 13 '13 at 1:05
1  
+1, excellent. It would be awesome if you could upload a version to a gist with a license other than SO's CC BY-SA. Here's my version that's Apache licensed: gist.github.com/orip/6686755 –  orip Sep 24 '13 at 15:48
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I strongly suspect it's because it's having to build the ISO chronology for the default time zone, which probably involves reading all the time zone information in.

You could verify this by calling ISOChronology.getInstance() first - time that, and then time a subsequent call to new DateTime(). I suspect it'll be fast.

Do you know which time zones are going to be relevant in your application? You may find you can make the whole thing much quicker by rebuilding Joda Time with a very much reduced time zone database. Alternatively, call DateTimeZone.setProvider() with your own implementation of Provider which doesn't do as much work.

It's worth checking whether that's actually the problem first, of course :) You may also want to try explicitly passing in the UTC time zone, which won't require reading in the time zone database... although you never know when you'll accidentally trigger a call which does require the default time zone, at which point you'll incur the same cost.

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Calling the ISOChronology took time as expected. The subsequent call to DateTime() was instant. I am not sure how you pass the time zone so I didn't try that. Also sorry for the delay in response, I had major surgery and just getting back. –  Mark Worsnop Mar 2 '11 at 1:48
    
I took the rebuilding with a smaller TZ database option. I blanked out the Olson TZDB sources leaving just the rules for the four or five TZs my app needs. This seems to fix the performance problem quite well. –  Domster May 13 '11 at 4:55
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I only need UTC in my application. So, following unchek's advice, I used

System.setProperty("org.joda.time.DateTimeZone.Provider", "org.joda.time.tz.UTCProvider");

org.joda.time.tz.UTCProvider is actually used by JodaTime as the secondary backup, so I thought why not use it for primary use? So far so good. It loads fast.

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I can confirm this issue with version 1, 1.5 and 1.62 of joda. Date4J is working well for me as an alternative.

http://www.date4j.net/

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I just performed the test that @"Name is carl" posted, on several devices. I must note that the test is not completely valid and the results are misleading (in that it only reflects a single instance of DateTime).

  1. From his test, When comparing DateTime to Date, DateTime is forced to parse the String ts, where Date does not parse anything.

  2. While the initial creation of the DateTime was accurate, it ONLY takes that much time on the very FIRST creation... every instance after that was 0ms (or very near 0ms)

To verify this, I used the following code and created 1000 new instances of DateTime on an OLD Android 2.3 device

    int iterations = 1000;
    long totalTime = 0;

    // Test Joda Date
    for (int i = 0; i < iterations; i++) {
        long d1 = System.currentTimeMillis();
        DateTime d = new DateTime();
        long d2 = System.currentTimeMillis();

        long duration = (d2 - d1);
        totalTime += duration;
        log.i(TAG, "datetime : " + duration);
    }
    log.i(TAG, "Average datetime : " + ((double) totalTime/ (double) iterations));

My results showed:

datetime : 264
datetime : 0
datetime : 0
datetime : 0
datetime : 0
datetime : 0
datetime : 0
...
datetime : 0
datetime : 0
datetime : 1
datetime : 0
...
datetime : 0
datetime : 0
datetime : 0

So, the result was that the first instance was 264ms and more than 95% of the following were 0ms (I occasionally had a 1ms, but never had a value larger than 1ms).

Hope this gives a clearer picture of the cost of using Joda.

NOTE: I was using joda-time version 2.1

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I found solution for me. I load UTC and default time zone. So it's loads very fast. And I think in this case I need catch broadcast TIME ZONE CHANGE and reload default time zone.

public class FastDateTimeZoneProvider implements Provider {
    public static final Set<String> AVAILABLE_IDS = new HashSet<String>();
    static {
        AVAILABLE_IDS.add("UTC");
        AVAILABLE_IDS.add(TimeZone.getDefault().getID());
    }

    public DateTimeZone getZone(String id) {
        int rawOffset = 0;

        if (id == null) {
            return DateTimeZone.getDefault();
        }

        TimeZone tz = TimeZone.getTimeZone(id);
        if (tz == null) {
            return DateTimeZone.getDefault();
        }

        rawOffset = tz.getRawOffset();

        //sub-optimal. could be improved to only create a new Date every few minutes
        if (tz.inDaylightTime(new Date())) {
            rawOffset += tz.getDSTSavings();
        }
        return DateTimeZone.forOffsetMillis(rawOffset);
    }

    public Set getAvailableIDs() {
        return AVAILABLE_IDS;
    }
}
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And here is code for update default time zone DateTimeZone dateTimeZone = DateTimeZone.forTimeZone(TimeZone.getDefault()); DateTimeZone.setDefault(dateTimeZone); –  ElijahSh Nov 27 '12 at 12:44
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This quick note to complete the answer about date4j from @Steven

I ran a quick and dirty benchmark comparing java.util.Date, jodatime and date4j on the weakest android device I have (HTC Dream/Sapphire 2.3.5).

Details : normal build (no proguard), implementing the FastDateTimeZoneProvider for jodatime.

Here's the code:

String ts = "2010-01-19T23:59:59.123456789";
long d1 = System.currentTimeMillis();
DateTime d = new DateTime(ts);
long d2 = System.currentTimeMillis();
System.err.println("datetime : " + dateUtils.durationtoString(d2 - d1));
d1 = System.currentTimeMillis();
Date dd = new Date();
d2 = System.currentTimeMillis();
System.err.println("date : " + dateUtils.durationtoString(d2 - d1));

d1 = System.currentTimeMillis();
hirondelle.date4j.DateTime ddd = new hirondelle.date4j.DateTime(ts);
d2 = System.currentTimeMillis();
System.err.println("date4j : " + dateUtils.durationtoString(d2 - d1));

Here are the results :

           debug       | normal 
joda     : 3s (3577ms) | 0s (284ms)
date     : 0s (0)      | 0s (0s)
date4j   : 0s (55ms)   | 0s (2ms) 

One last thing, the jar sizes :

jodatime 2.1 : 558 kb 
date4j       : 35 kb

I think I'll give date4j a try.

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The top answer provided by plowman is not reliable if you must have precise timezone computations for your dates. Here is an example of problem that can happen:

Suppose your DateTime object is set for 4:00am, one hour after daylight savings have started that day. When Joda checks the FastDateTimeZoneProvider provider before 3:00am (i.e., before daylight savings) it will get a DateTimeZone object with the wrong offset because the tz.inDaylightTime(new Date()) check will return false.

My solution was to adopt the recently published joda-time-android library. It uses the core of Joda but makes sure to load a time zone only as needed from the raw folder. Setting up is easy with gradle. In your project, extend the Application class and add the following on its onCreate():

public class MyApp extends Application {
    @Override
    public void onCreate() {
        super.onCreate();

        ResourceZoneInfoProvider.init(this);
    }
}

The author wrote a blog post about it last year.

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