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I have two string, that i d like to use them as the dictionary key but i m kinda lazy to create another object, calculate the hashcode of the strings etc.

So instead of that, can i get the hashcodes of two string , add them and use the result as the key of Dictionary?

It s possible to cause collisions? right?.

Any ideas?

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Which .NET version are you on? –  Lasse V. Karlsen Feb 20 '11 at 20:28

4 Answers 4

up vote 19 down vote accepted

I have two string, that i d like to use them as the dictionary key but i m kinda lazy to create another object

In .NET 4.0, you can use the Tuple<T1, T2> class as the key, with T1 and T2 = string.

can i get the hashcodes of two string , add them and use the result as the key of Dictionary?

The formula Tuple<T1, T2> uses for combining hash-codes is something like (not documented or guaranteed not to change): ((h1 << 5) + h1) ^ h2, which should be decent enough for your purposes. By the way, naively adding isn't normally the best way to combine hash-codes.

It s possible to cause collisions? right?.

This is always possible, even with a single string. There are more strings than there are 32-bit integers.

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Use a tuple:

var dict = new Dictionary<Tuple<string,string>,SomeType>();
dict.Add(Tuple.Create("Hello","World"), new SomeType());
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If you're on .NET 4, you can use the Tuple class:

Dictionary<Tuple<string, string>, TValue> dict = new ...

If you're not on .NET 4, you should create your own type to hold this.

You can use the KeyValuePair struct, but it inherits the relevant methods from the base value type, and thus relies heavily on reflection. This has performance implications (see bottom of answer.)

For KeyValuePair:

Dictionary<KeyValuePair<string, string>, TValue> dict = new ...

Here's a general type you can use if you don't want to cook it up yourself:

public struct SimpleTuple<TValue1, TValue2>
{
    private readonly TValue1 _Value1;
    private readonly TValue2 _Value2;

    public SimpleTuple(TValue1 value1, TValue2 value2)
    {
        _Value1 = value1;
        _Value2 = value2;
    }

    public TValue1 Value1 { get { return _Value1; } }
    public TValue2 Value2 { get { return _Value2; } }

    public int GetHashCode()
    {
        unchecked
        {
            int result = 37;

            result *= 23;
            if Value1 != null)
                result += Value1.GetHashCode();

            result *= 23;
            if (Value2 != null)
                result += Value2.GetHashCode();

            return result;
        }
    }

    public override bool Equals(object obj)
    {
        if (obj == null) return false;
        if (obj.GetType() != typeof(SimpleTuple<TValue1, TValue2>))
            return false;

        var other = (SimpleTuple<TValue1, TValue2>)obj;
        return Equals(other.Value1, Value1) && Equals(other.Value2, Value2);
    }
}

Of course, KeyValuePair also works on .NET 4.0 just as good bad.

As for collisions, it depends on what you mean. A hashtable (a dictionary uses a hashtable structure internally) always have the possibility of getting key collisions, but that's where the comparison comes into play. If two distinct keys generate the same hash code, the dictionary class will compare key against key to see if they're really the same values, or just produce the same hash code.

The reasoning behind why a hashtable will always have the possibility of collisions is best described with the pidgeonhole principle (Wikipedia).

This means that if you two different keys would cause a collision, it wouldn't be a problem, they'll both be stored, with the right values, in the dictionary.

Of course, if you create the same key twice, the dictionary will count that as the same key and either fail to add a new value, or overwrite the existing one (depending on how you ask it to add the value.)

This will throw an exception on duplicate keys:

dict.Add(key, value);

This will add, or overwrite existing:

dict[key] = value;

In response to the comment by Ani, I wrote the following simple test script for LINQPad. The output was:

KeyValuePair: 975ms
MyKeyValuePair: 52ms

script:

void Main()
{
    const int iterations = 10 * 1000 * 1000;

    // JIT preheat
    Test1(1);
    Test2(1);

    Stopwatch sw = Stopwatch.StartNew();
    Test1(iterations);
    sw.Stop();
    Debug.WriteLine("KeyValuePair: " + sw.ElapsedMilliseconds + "ms");

    sw = Stopwatch.StartNew();
    Test2(iterations);
    sw.Stop();
    Debug.WriteLine("MyKeyValuePair: " + sw.ElapsedMilliseconds + "ms");
}

public static void Test1(int iterations)
{
    for (int index = 0; index < iterations; index++)
    {
        var kvp = new KeyValuePair<int, int>(index, index);
        kvp.GetHashCode();
    }
}

public static void Test2(int iterations)
{
    for (int index = 0; index < iterations; index++)
    {
        var kvp = new MyKeyValuePair<int, int>(index, index);
        kvp.GetHashCode();
    }
}

public struct MyKeyValuePair<TKey, TValue>
{
    private readonly TKey _Key;
    private readonly TValue _Value;

    public MyKeyValuePair(TKey key, TValue value)
    {
        _Key = key;
        _Value = value;
    }

    public TKey Key { get { return _Key; } }
    public TValue Value { get { return _Value; } }

    public int GetHashCode()
    {
        unchecked
        {
            int result = 37;

            result *= 23;
            if (Key != null)
                result += Key.GetHashCode();

            result *= 23;
            if (Value != null)
                result += Value.GetHashCode();

            return result;
        }
    }

    public override bool Equals(object obj)
    {
        if (obj == null) return false;
        if (obj.GetType() != typeof(MyKeyValuePair<TKey, TValue>))
            return false;

        var other = (MyKeyValuePair<TKey, TValue>)obj;
        return Equals(other.Key, Key) && Equals(other.Value, Value);
    }
}
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Any experience with using KVPs as the key? I'm wondering what the performance will be like, considering equality and hash-code computation should come from System.ValueType given that it doesn't appear to override them. –  Ani Feb 20 '11 at 20:44
    
I haven't directly measured this, but I've never been in a position where a dictionary was the major culprit during performance analysis either. It might very well be much slower than handcoding a similar type with specific methods. Let me do that and come back with an edit. –  Lasse V. Karlsen Feb 20 '11 at 20:47
    
@Ani, you're spot on, KeyValuePair is a bad choice. I'll edit my answer. –  Lasse V. Karlsen Feb 20 '11 at 20:53
    
+1 Nice; noted. –  Ani Feb 20 '11 at 21:15
    
Any reason why you didn't add a test for Tuple? You start your answer by recommending to use a Tuple, but don't measure it. I did a test similar to the one you did for KeyValuePair, and it performs even worse. –  Meta-Knight Jan 31 '12 at 15:53

Simple solution, and one that works with all versions of .net. Just concatenate the strings together.

var dictionary = new Dictionary<string, int>();
dictionary.Add("The meaning" + " of life, the universe, and everything", 42);

Of course this only works with 2 strings (though you could use .ToString() on many other types) and if you don't need to lookup the dictionary by only one of the two strings, but if you have both it's quite simple.

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2  
I'll add that this technique works if there are some characters that aren't EVER included in the two strings. For example Name and Surname. Both of them shouldn't have a \n (new line). So Name\nSurname is "good enough" (be aware that some crafty hacker could then use it to hack your site! It would be very difficult, but not impossible). Considering that many systems are C based, probably the character \0 is quite safe to use. (OR you could simply escape any occurrance of the character you are using to divide the strings, for example: Name.Replace("|", "||") + "|" + Surname –  xanatos Feb 20 '11 at 20:38

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