Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I'm would like to create an algorithm that will divide text into 3-evenly sized groups (based on text length). Since this will be put to use for line-breaks, the order of the text needs to be maintained.

For instance this string:

Just testing to see how this works. 

would sort to:

Just testing   // 12 characters
to see how     // 10 characters
this works.    // 11 characters

Any ideas?

share|improve this question
1  
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Word_wrap – miku Feb 20 '11 at 21:01
1  
Bonus points if you can make it for n-groups instead of just 3! ;) – Brian A Bird Feb 20 '11 at 21:02
1  
So, do you need to sort text or split it? It's kinda different things. – Nikita Rybak Feb 20 '11 at 21:04
    
It should be n groups of relatively similar size ? Please explain what decides the size of the groups. – Yochai Timmer Feb 20 '11 at 21:09
    
Forget the n-groups. Just 3 groups that are as close in size as possible. – Brian A Bird Feb 20 '11 at 21:15
up vote 2 down vote accepted

The "minimum raggedness" dynamic program, also from the Wikipedia article on word wrap, can be adapted to your needs. Set LineWidth = len(text)/n - 1 and ignore the comment about infinite penalties for exceeding the line width; use the definition of c(i, j) as is with P = 2.


Code. I took the liberty of modifying the DP always to return exactly n lines, at the cost of increasing the running time from O(#words ** 2) to O(#words ** 2 * n).

def minragged(text, n=3):
    """
    >>> minragged('Just testing to see how this works.')
    ['Just testing', 'to see how', 'this works.']
    >>> minragged('Just testing to see how this works.', 10)
    ['', '', 'Just', 'testing', 'to', 'see', 'how', 'this', 'works.', '']
    """
    words = text.split()
    cumwordwidth = [0]
    # cumwordwidth[-1] is the last element
    for word in words:
        cumwordwidth.append(cumwordwidth[-1] + len(word))
    totalwidth = cumwordwidth[-1] + len(words) - 1  # len(words) - 1 spaces
    linewidth = float(totalwidth - (n - 1)) / float(n)  # n - 1 line breaks
    def cost(i, j):
        """
        cost of a line words[i], ..., words[j - 1] (words[i:j])
        """
        actuallinewidth = max(j - i - 1, 0) + (cumwordwidth[j] - cumwordwidth[i])
        return (linewidth - float(actuallinewidth)) ** 2
    # best[l][k][0] is the min total cost for words 0, ..., k - 1 on l lines
    # best[l][k][1] is a minimizing index for the start of the last line
    best = [[(0.0, None)] + [(float('inf'), None)] * len(words)]
    # xrange(upper) is the interval 0, 1, ..., upper - 1
    for l in xrange(1, n + 1):
        best.append([])
        for j in xrange(len(words) + 1):
            best[l].append(min((best[l - 1][k][0] + cost(k, j), k) for k in xrange(j + 1)))
    lines = []
    b = len(words)
    # xrange(upper, 0, -1) is the interval upper, upper - 1, ..., 1
    for l in xrange(n, 0, -1):
        a = best[l][b][1]
        lines.append(' '.join(words[a:b]))
        b = a
    lines.reverse()
    return lines

if __name__ == '__main__':
    import doctest
    doctest.testmod()
share|improve this answer
    
I read about the minimum raggedness and it does seem to be exactly what I need. I have no idea how to convert that equation to usable code though. Any ideas? – Brian A Bird Feb 21 '11 at 3:41
    
Ugh... I'm trying to go through it and convert it to Objective-C and Actionscript... but I'm failing on both accounts. Is that a python script? I hate to be so co-dependent, but I just can't parse it...even with the code hints. – Brian A Bird Feb 22 '11 at 2:03
    
Yes, it's a Python script. – someone Feb 22 '11 at 2:16
    
Well, that is definitely what I'm looking for! Thanks a million. I'm gonna see if I can find a friend who knows Python. – Brian A Bird Feb 22 '11 at 2:48
    
This code was written in Objective-C and placed here: link – Brian A Bird Feb 24 '11 at 23:31

You can try the next simple heuristic for starters: Place to iterators in n/3 and 2n/3 and search for the closest space near each of them.

share|improve this answer
    
Can you create some code for this? I don't understand what you mean. :( – Brian A Bird Feb 20 '11 at 21:15

From http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Word_wrap:

SpaceLeft := LineWidth
for each Word in Text
    if Width(Word) > SpaceLeft
        insert line break before Word in Text
        SpaceLeft := LineWidth - Width(Word)
    else
        SpaceLeft := SpaceLeft - (Width(Word) + SpaceWidth)

This method is used by many modern word processors, such as OpenOffice.org Writer and Microsoft Word. This algorithm is optimal in that it always puts the text on the minimum number of lines.

share|improve this answer
2  
I think the question is different from usual word wrapping. Usually, you know the line width in advance, and the algorithm determines the number of lines. Here, you know the number of lines in advance, and the algorithm determines the line width. – Sven Marnach Feb 20 '11 at 21:04
    
Sven is correct -- there is no set line width. – Brian A Bird Feb 20 '11 at 21:07
    
How about taking the length of the string and divide it by the number of lines you want? It would give an approximation at least. – miku Feb 20 '11 at 22:10

The answer from "someone" works fine. However, I had problems translating this into SWIFT code. Here is my translation for all those that are interested.

import Foundation   

class SplitText{
    typealias MinRag = (Float, Int) // meaning (cost for line (so far), word index)

    // from http://stackoverflow.com/questions/6426017/word-wrap-to-x-lines-instead-of-maximum-width-least-raggedness?lq=1
    class func splitText(text:String, numberOfLines:Int)-> [String]{
        //preparations
        var words = split(text, maxSplit:100, allowEmptySlices: false, isSeparator:{(s:Character)-> Bool in return s == " " || s == "\n"})
        var cumwordwidth =  [Int](); //cummulative word widths
        cumwordwidth.append(0);
        for word in words{
            cumwordwidth.append(cumwordwidth[cumwordwidth.count - 1] + count(word));
        }
        var totalwidth = cumwordwidth[cumwordwidth.count - 1] + count(words) - 1;
        var linewidth:Float = Float(totalwidth - (numberOfLines - 1)) / Float(numberOfLines)

        // cost function for one line for words i .. j
        var cost = { (i:Int,j:Int)-> Float in
            var actuallinewidth = max(j - i - 1, 0) + (cumwordwidth[j] - cumwordwidth[i]);
            var remainingWidth: Float = linewidth - Float(actuallinewidth)
            return remainingWidth * remainingWidth
        }

        var best = [[MinRag]]()
        var tmp = [MinRag]();
        //ensure that data structure is initialised in a way that we start with adding the first word
        tmp.append((0, -1));
        for  word in words {
            tmp.append((Float.infinity , -1));
        }
        best.append(tmp);
        //now we can start. We simply calculate the cost for all possible lines
        for l in 1...numberOfLines {
            tmp = [MinRag]()
            for j in 0...words.count {
                var min:MinRag = (best[l - 1][0].0 + cost(0, j), 0);
                var k: Int
                for k = 0; k < j + 1 ; ++k  {
                    var loc:Float = best[l - 1][k].0 + cost(k, j);
                    if (loc < min.0 || (loc == min.0 && k < min.1)) {
                        min=(loc, k);
                    }
                    println("l=\(l), j=\(j), k=\(k), min=\(min)")
                }
                tmp.append(min);
            }
            best.append(tmp);
        }

        //now build the answer based on above calculations
        var lines = [String]();
        var b = words.count;
        var o:Int
        for o = numberOfLines; o > 0 ; --o {
            var a = best[o][b].1;
            lines.append(" ".join(words[a...b-1]));
            b = a;
        }
        return reverse(lines);
    }
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.