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As you may remember, I am trying to use GCD to speed up some of my code, namely a collision detection and resolution engine. However, I am clearly doing something wrong because all of my GCD code is significantly slower and less consistent than my serial code (between 1.4x and 10x slower). Allow me to give you an example: I am iterating over an array in a bubble-sort fashion to determine all possible collisions among objects in that array:

- (double) detectCollisionsInArray:(NSArray*)objects
{   
    int count = [objects count];
    if (count > 0)
    {       
        double time = CFAbsoluteTimeGetCurrent();
        for (int i = 0; i < count; i++)
        {
            for (int j = i + 1; j < count; j++)
            {
                /** LOTS AND LOTS OF WORK FOR EACH OBJECT **/
            }
        }

        return CFAbsoluteTimeGetCurrent() - time;
    }

    return 0;
}

Pretty straightforward, and it seems to perform well given the constraints of the problem. However, I would like to take advantage of the fact that the state of each object is not modified in the code section and use GCD to parallelize this work. To do this I am trying something like this:

- (double) detectCollisionsInArray:(NSArray*)objects
{   
    int count = [objects count];
    if (count > 0)
    {
        NSOperationQueue* opQueue = [[NSOperationQueue alloc] init];
        NSBlockOperation* blockOperation = nil;

        double time = CFAbsoluteTimeGetCurrent();
        for (int i = 0; i < count; i++)
        {
            for (int j = i + 1; j < count; j++)
            {
                void (^workBlock) (void) = ^() 
                {
                    /** LOTS AND LOTS OF WORK FOR EACH OBJECT **/
                };

                if (!blockOperation)
                {
                    blockOperation = [NSBlockOperation blockOperationWithBlock:b];
                }
                else
                {
                    [blockOperation addExecutionBlock:workBlock];
                }
            }
        }

        [opQueue addOperation:blockOperation];
        [opQueue autorelease];

        return CFAbsoluteTimeGetCurrent() - time;
    }

    return 0;
}

Can anyone help to put me on the right track and perhaps provide a link to a good GCD tutorial? I have looked over several GCD tutorials and scoured all of the documentation and I still feel that my grasp on the subject is tenuous at best. Thanks!

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2  
Have you profiled the application to see where the time is being taken up? –  Chuck Feb 20 '11 at 21:15
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2 Answers

up vote 29 down vote accepted

Is there a reason you're not using the GCD C API and the dispatch_* family of functions? You don't have much control over the GCD aspects of NSOperationQueue (like which queue you want to submit the blocks to). Also, I can't tell if you're using iOS or not, but NSOperationQueue does not use GCD on iOS. That might be the reason it spawned so many threads. Either way, your code will be shorter and simpler if you use the GCD API directly:

- (double) detectCollisionsInArray:(NSArray*)objects
{   
  int count = [objects count];
  if (count > 0)
  {
    double time = CFAbsoluteTimeGetCurrent();

    dispatch_group_t group = dispatch_group_create();
    dispatch_queue_t queue = dispatch_get_global_queue(DISPATCH_QUEUE_PRIORITY_DEFAULT, 0);
    for (int i = 0; i < count; i++)
    {
      dispatch_group_async(group, queue, ^{
        for (int j = i + 1; j < count; j++)
        {
          dispatch_group_async(group, queue, ^{
            /** LOTS AND LOTS OF WORK FOR EACH OBJECT **/
          });
        }
      });
    }
    dispatch_group_wait(group, DISPATCH_TIME_FOREVER);
    dispatch_release(group);
    return CFAbsoluteTimeGetCurrent() - time;
  }
  return 0;
}

You can use a dispatch_group to group all of the executions together and wait for them all to finish with dispatch_group_wait. If you don't care to know when the the blocks finish, you can ignore the group part and just use dispatch_async. The dispatch_get_global_queue function will get one of the 3 concurrent queues (low, default or high priority) for you to submit your blocks to. You shouldn't have to worry about limiting the thread count or anything like that. The GCD scheduler is supposed to do all of that for you. Just make sure you submit to a concurrent queue, which could either be one of the 3 global queues, or a queue you've created by passing DISPATCH_QUEUE_CONCURRENT to dispatch_queue_create (this is available starting OS X 10.7 and iOS 5.0).

If you're doing some file I/O in each block or taxing some other resource, you might need to reign in GCD and limit the number of blocks you're submitting to the queue at once. This will have the same effect as limiting the concurrent operation count in an NSOperationQueue. You can use a GCD semaphore to do this:

- (double) detectCollisionsInArray:(NSArray*)objects
{   
  int count = [objects count];
  if (count > 0)
  {
    double time = CFAbsoluteTimeGetCurrent();

    dispatch_group_t group = dispatch_group_create();
    dispatch_semaphore_t semaphore = dispatch_semaphore_create(10);
    dispatch_queue_t queue = dispatch_get_global_queue(DISPATCH_QUEUE_PRIORITY_DEFAULT, 0);
    for (int i = 0; i < count; i++)
    {
      dispatch_semaphore_wait(semaphore, DISPATCH_TIME_FOREVER);
      dispatch_group_async(group, queue, ^{
        for (int j = i + 1; j < count; j++)
        {
          dispatch_semaphore_wait(semaphore, DISPATCH_TIME_FOREVER);
          dispatch_group_async(group, queue, ^{
            /** LOTS AND LOTS OF WORK FOR EACH OBJECT **/
            dispatch_semaphore_signal(semaphore);
          });
        }
        dispatch_semaphore_signal(semaphore);
      });
    }
    dispatch_group_wait(group, DISPATCH_TIME_FOREVER);
    dispatch_release(group);
    dispatch_release(semaphore);
    return CFAbsoluteTimeGetCurrent() - time;
  }
  return 0;
}

Once you get the hang of it, GCD is very simple to use. I use it all over my code now.

Can anyone help to put me on the right track and perhaps provide a link to a good GCD tutorial?

Run, don't walk over to Mike Ash's blog. His series on GCD is the clearest and most concise I've seen, and it'll only take you around 30 minutes to read the whole thing. Apple's WWDC videos from 2010 on GCD And blocks are also pretty good.

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Firstly, I like ObjC. That's the main reason I have stuck with NSOperationQueue and them. The more I can stay in ObjC the better. Not to say that I don't like the C implementation or anything, but I am familiar with the advantages and disadvantages of OOP and try to keep my code as consistent as possible. Secondly, because of the nested for-loops, I can't run enumerateObjectsWithOptions:usingBlock: and similarly for simply submitting count to dispatch_apply, I will have to submit a new block per iteration. Could you modify your example to include the nested loop structure? –  Grimless Feb 23 '11 at 6:21
6  
I love ObjC, but GCD was created to work independently of ObjC, and you need to use its C API to really take advantage of it. I just edited my answer to use a nested for loop, and it uses a dispatch group rather than dispatch_apply. It allows you to nest the blocks and still wait for all of them to finish. I also included an example using a semaphore in case you need to limit the number of threads getting spawned by GCD. –  Nathan Eror Feb 23 '11 at 18:10
    
In iOS 4 and later, operation queues use Grand Central Dispatch to execute operations.. developer.apple.com/library/ios/#documentation/cocoa/reference/… –  Miraaj Jul 3 '13 at 6:28
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In your code you are delaying the work you need to do for each object until the end of the nested for loop. That said, when the loop finishes you will have one operation with lots of blocks for a bunch of objects and you won't thereby take advantage of the GCD properly.

I would suggest you create one NSBlockOperation for each object and add it to the NSOperationQueue in the end of each for (int j = i + 1; j < count; j++) iteration.

This way, the system will begin processing the work you need to do for each object as soon as the iteration ends.

Also keep in mind that the queue shouldn't be much larger than the available processors, otherwise you will have some overhead on the thread switch process that will compromise speed.

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So you are suggesting I move the [opQueue addOperation:blockOperation]; line up into the body of the loop and create a new NSBlockOperation for each iteration? I tried this and ended up with a 100x slowdown. After profiling, GCD was spawning some 500 threads. Is there an easy way to find out the number of processors so I can limit it? Do you think it would be better if I create a handful of NSBlockOperations and then add execution blocks to those to make it semi-parallel? I forgot to mention: the Dispatch in Instruments has been spin-locked after running my application for 5 min. –  Grimless Feb 20 '11 at 21:40
    
It spawned 500 threads probably because you didn't set a limit in the NSOperationQueue. You can do that by calling [opQueue setMaxConcurrentOperationCount:]. I don't know where you can find the number of available processors, but i guess that having 4 concurrent operations is ok. With this you have parallelism without compromising speed either with thread spawn overhead nor operation delaying like you were doing. –  Tiago Feb 20 '11 at 21:45
    
OK, what might I set that to? I figured GCD would automatically manage that kind of thing. I'm at a loss as to what to try next. Any ideas? –  Grimless Feb 20 '11 at 21:47
1  
If you continue to have problems you can try different configurations like handling 4 blocks at a time per operation, increase/decrease queue size, till you get your runtime optimized. –  Tiago Feb 20 '11 at 21:50
1  
@Tiago: It's worth clarifying that setting the max concurrent operation count is not normally necessary. It only becomes necessary when every operation causes the thread to sleep for something such as I/O; that's when you get the problem Mike Ash described: mikeash.com/pyblog/friday-qa-2009-09-25-gcd-practicum.html That's probably what bit @Grimless in this case, but, as I said, it is not normally necessary. –  Peter Hosey Feb 21 '11 at 2:08
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